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Subject: "D5200 or D7000" Previous topic | Next topic
SaltandPep Registered since 10th Dec 2009Fri 22-Mar-13 02:13 PM
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"D5200 or D7000"


US
          

I could really use your expert advice. Photography has gotten to be a pretty serious hobby for me. I currently own a Nikon D60, 18-55 and 55-200 kit lenses and a 105 micro 2.8. I enjoy doing flower photography and I want to upgrade my equipment. I was looking at the Nikon 5200 and the 7000. I am looking for the best focus possible, more clarity at higher ISOs, multiple exposure in camera, depth of field preview, possibly dedicated buttons, a weight fairly close to the D60, and use of all lenses if possible. I also need a great deal of stability to prevent as much camera shake as possible as the old hands are not as steady as they used to be!!!! I shoot in aperature priority and I need the auto focus.

Would an upgrade in the camera be suggested at this point? Also, aside from using the macro lens, I find myself using the 55-200 a majority of the time so I can fill the frame with the flower when I am not doing macro. Unfortunately, there are many pics the lens won't take perhaps because of the speed or focus. Would there be a better lens for that?

By upgrading the camera, do you think it might make a difference in the quality of pics I can take?

Thanks so much for your advice.

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blw Moderator Awarded for his high level of expertise in various areas Nikonian since 18th Jun 2004Fri 22-Mar-13 07:09 PM
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#1. "RE: D5200 or D7000"
In response to Reply # 0


Richmond, US
          

I've shot quite a lot of flower images over the years, so this is pretty familiar territory for me.

> By upgrading the camera, do you think it might make a difference in the quality of pics I can take?

For the most part, no. Let's look at the various requirements:

- best focus possible. Flowers in general are not challenging AF subjects, certainly not like birds in flight, sports, etc. Although they do move, they move in generally predictable ways and only in exceptional circumstances do they move very far. The D60 can EASILY keep track of all of that. So while the newer AF systems are better, they're probably not very much better AT THIS. My D3's AF is a lot more capable than the AF on my 10-year-old D100, but for flowers, I don't think it makes much difference, if any at all.

- more clarity at higher ISOs. Yes, definitely the newer cameras have better sensors that are more capable at higher ISOs, perhaps at much higher ISOs. Since they are inherently less noisy, less noise reduction is required, leaving more of the original capture in place.

- multiple exposure in camera. I'm not sure which cameras have it, but I think that the D7100 has it and perhaps the D7000 too.

- DOF preview. Again, I'm not sure which ones have it and which don't, but certainly having a button for it is better than not. On the other hand, you can get a pretty good idea by just taking the picture and looking at the result on the LCD. I have discovered that the DOF preview does NOT show exactly what you'll get on the sensor, although it's definitely way better than not using it. If you didn't like the result, delete it, change the parameters and shoot again. This is definitely NOT like it was in film days. Again, not a reason to avoid it, but there's a good chance that you can work around the lack of the feature on your current camera.

- dedicated buttons. Definitely the higher-spec models have more dedicated buttons, and they definitely make it more convenient to shoot. But it doesn't actually improve the quality of the results, at least not directly.

- weight close to D60. The D60 is 16oz, the D5200 is 18oz and the D7100 is 24oz. I didn't look up the D7000 but it's probably 24 also.

- use of all lenses. The D60 (and D5200) are already the most limited cameras, having identical requirements, namely requires lenses with internal focusing motors for AF; if it works on a D60, it works on a D5200. The D7000/7100 can also use screwdriver AF lenses in AF mode, which is essentially all Nikon F mount AF lenses (all but the two museum pieces made for the F3AF back in the early 80s).

- I also need a great deal of stability to prevent as much camera shake as possible. The camera doesn't help here. If anything, the higher resolution sensors of the newer cameras will make any shake even more visible than before. In other words, they put the emphasis on better technique, and without that, your results might well be not even as good as what you have now. The real answer to this is a good tripod and especially the discipline to use it.

- I need the auto focus. Understood, but macro is one discipline that really does benefit from manual focus. This becomes particularly true once the camera is on a tripod.

- there are many pics the lens won't take perhaps because of the speed or focus. Would there be a better lens for that?

The first thing to find out is what AF mode you're using. There is no doubt that the 55-200 is one of the slower AF implementations available today. However, it's not that slow! I have one of these and even on my slowest camera (the D100) it can easily track baseball players, racing cars and sheepdogs at work. All of these are MUCH more challenging than flowers, so if you are having trouble with AF with the flowers, it's probably not entirely the lens. It is very definitely the case that lenses with faster AF mechanisms are an improvement, but they tend to be a significant outlay. My recommendation is to investigate and improve your technique first, since that is less expensive and if successful will also improve your results with better lenses. As an illustration, I do most of my flower and butterfly photography with the 200/f4 AFD Micro-Nikkor. That lens is literally the slowest AF lens I know of, definitively and obviously slower than the 55-200VR.

In summary, a camera upgrade will definitely make things more convenient, and all of the current models will certainly do better in high ISO situations than your D60. But other than that last point, I doubt that a camera upgrade will materially improve your results. An improvement in lenses will possibly help focus matters, but I think that improving your technique will help much more and would also improve your results from a better lens.

_____
Brian... a bicoastal Nikonian and Team Member

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SaltandPep Registered since 10th Dec 2009Sat 23-Mar-13 01:35 AM
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#2. "RE: D5200 or D7000"
In response to Reply # 1


US
          

Hi Brian:

I can't thank you enough for your wonderful advice. I so appreciate that you took the time to write such great information. I want so much to improve my technique and perhaps you could give me some suggestions. I have taken a couple community school short night classes and some on-line classes where pictures are sent in to be critiqued (PPSOP). I also read when I can and practice a lot at a large garden here in Miami. I feel like I am not really progressing at this point. Is there anything else that might help?

Also, on the subject of tripods, I do mainly outdoor photography so I have to carry my tripod a great deal and it really has some weight to it. Can you recommend a good tripod that would likely help in this case?
Thanks so much for your help.

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blw Moderator Awarded for his high level of expertise in various areas Nikonian since 18th Jun 2004Sat 23-Mar-13 02:41 PM
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#3. "RE: D5200 or D7000"
In response to Reply # 2


Richmond, US
          

On the subject of technique, the first question is what focusing mode you are using. Are you using AF-S, AF-C, AF-A or M? Single area (point) or Dynamic Area? (Look in Custom settings 02 and 03.)

Tripods: your profile is pretty empty What kind of tripod are you using now? What material is involved? Carbon fiber tripods tend to be the lightest - but also the most expensive, possibly by a considerable margin. For example, I have an ancient Gitzo 1410 that is rock solid; it is built out of aluminum. It also, unfortunately seems to weigh as if it were carved out of solid granite, with the result that I barely ever use it. With a ball head I think it probably weighs about 12 lbs - that's with no camera or lens. I have a newer Gitzo 1348 that is pretty similar in size, is about 98% as stable, and cost three or four times as much. But it's carbon fiber and it probably weighs more like 5.5 lbs with the head - a big difference when lugging it around. It's still not light, but I do use it a lot. It made the hike up from the central Yosemite valley to the top of Nevada Falls, for example, which probably says more about me than about the tripod.

On the other hand, my travel tripod (a Benro A1691) is aluminum. It weighs about 6oz more than the carbon fiber equivalent, the C1691 - yet the carbon version costs almost twice as much. it was definitely NOT worth it to me to pay twice as much to get rid of the 6oz, even for a tripod whose ONLY purpose was travel. The question that's surely coming is whether or not I'd recommend either the a1691 or c1691 as a main tripod, and I would say no, although clearly I must do something similar to that when I'm traveling. Still, if you place a serious premium on the weight, perhaps. These little ones definitely take a lot more care and attention to detail to get good results, and without that care and attention to detail, photographic results are likely not awfully better than careful, skillful hand-held work. Of course, those with the skills and discipline to do the latter are probably precisely the same folks that will succeed with an underpowered tripod and head... There are almost certainly other tripods that are better suited to the relatively non-travel work than my travel tripod.

_____
Brian... a bicoastal Nikonian and Team Member

My gallery is online. Comments and critique welcomed any time!

  

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SaltandPep Registered since 10th Dec 2009Sat 23-Mar-13 09:42 PM
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#4. "RE: D5200 or D7000"
In response to Reply # 3


US
          

I am using AF-S Single-Serveo AF
and Single Point. Is that the correct setting?

Many thanks for the tripod advice.

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SaltandPep Registered since 10th Dec 2009Sat 23-Mar-13 09:59 PM
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#5. "RE: D5200 or D7000"
In response to Reply # 4


US
          

I am also using a Manfratto 055XProb Tripod and Manfratto handgrip ballhead #322RC2. Thanks!

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jec6613 Silver Member Nikonian since 12th Feb 2013Sat 23-Mar-13 10:27 PM
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#6. "RE: D5200 or D7000"
In response to Reply # 1


Norwalk, US
          

I can add to the, "Which camera does what," here.

>- multiple exposure in camera. I'm not sure which cameras
>have it, but I think that the D7100 has it and perhaps the
>D7000 too.

All Expeed cameras (the ones which accept picture controls) do this - so the D3100 and later, the entire D5x00 series, D7x00 series, and all FX cameras.

>- DOF preview. Again, I'm not sure which ones have it and
>which don't, but certainly having a button for it is better
>than not. On the other hand, you can get a pretty good idea
>by just taking the picture and looking at the result on the
>LCD. I have discovered that the DOF preview does NOT show
>exactly what you'll get on the sensor, although it's
>definitely way better than not using it. If you didn't like
>the result, delete it, change the parameters and shoot again.
>This is definitely NOT like it was in film days. Again, not a
>reason to avoid it, but there's a good chance that you can
>work around the lack of the feature on your current camera.

D7000 and higher only. You can *KIND OF* get it on the D5200 in live view mode, but not really.

>- weight close to D60. The D60 is 16oz, the D5200 is 18oz and
>the D7100 is 24oz. I didn't look up the D7000 but it's
>probably 24 also.

The D7000 is definitely in the 24 oz range.

>- use of all lenses. The D60 (and D5200) are already the most
>limited cameras, having identical requirements, namely
>requires lenses with internal focusing motors for AF; if it
>works on a D60, it works on a D5200. The D7000/7100 can also
>use screwdriver AF lenses in AF mode, which is essentially all
>Nikon F mount AF lenses (all but the two museum pieces made
>for the F3AF back in the early 80s).

I think there were three museum pieces for the F3AF, but, regardless, the D7000 does add the ability to meter with manual focus lenses, and has an AI feeler for aperture rings.

So while the D60 (and D5200) can only focus with AF-S and AF-I lenses, and only meter with AF lenses, the D7000 adds compatibility and metering with every F mount lens ever made by Nikon, except:

- F3AF lenses
- IX Nikkors
- Invasive Fisheyes (needs a camera with a hard mirror lockup)
- Pre-AI lenses (pre-1977), unless they've been converted.

>- there are many pics the lens won't take perhaps because of
>the speed or focus. Would there be a better lens for that?
>
>The first thing to find out is what AF mode you're using.
>There is no doubt that the 55-200 is one of the slower AF
>implementations available today. However, it's not that slow!
> I have one of these and even on my slowest camera (the D100)
>it can easily track baseball players, racing cars and
>sheepdogs at work. All of these are MUCH more challenging
>than flowers, so if you are having trouble with AF with the
>flowers, it's probably not entirely the lens. It is very
>definitely the case that lenses with faster AF mechanisms are
>an improvement, but they tend to be a significant outlay. My
>recommendation is to investigate and improve your technique
>first, since that is less expensive and if successful will
>also improve your results with better lenses. As an
>illustration, I do most of my flower and butterfly photography
>with the 200/f4 AFD Micro-Nikkor. That lens is literally the
>slowest AF lens I know of, definitively and obviously slower
>than the 55-200VR.

This is one thing where the 39 point AF system in the D5200/D7000 might help. Assuming you've set your release priority to focus, so it only fires the shutter if the lens can acquire focus, that is.

On the D60, you have only three AF points, and so if the subject moves off of them, you're in trouble. The 39 points are spread over a larger area of the frame, so the camera is more likely to be able to acquire focus. Also, the VR system can sometimes cause the image to jump around in the frame a bit and off of the AF points - the 39 point AF system is much better about both having a less jumpy finder image and has more points so you're not likely to lose focus. The 11 point system on the D3100, D5100 and D90 are also much better at this than the D60's system.

Hope this helps.

  

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SaltandPep Registered since 10th Dec 2009Sun 24-Mar-13 04:19 AM
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#7. "RE: D5200 or D7000"
In response to Reply # 6


US
          

Thanks, I did find this additional information very helpful. This site is amazing. I have learned so much in such a short time. I really, really appreciate it!

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jec6613 Silver Member Nikonian since 12th Feb 2013Sun 24-Mar-13 04:41 AM
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#8. "RE: D5200 or D7000"
In response to Reply # 7


Norwalk, US
          

As a side note and completely off topic, but blw is correct, there are only two F3AF lenses, the 80 f/2.8 and 200 f/3.5.

However, although they're pretty much museum pieces, they do also work on the F4 and N2020 with full autofocus. Just a random tidbit I found surfing to satisfy my curiosity.

  

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Ned_L Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge in various areas, especially Travel Photography Charter MemberSun 24-Mar-13 03:55 PM
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#9. "RE: D5200 or D7000"
In response to Reply # 0
Sun 24-Mar-13 03:57 PM by Ned_L

Philadelphia, US
          

Deborah, I thought I'd add my two cents here, but first, I'd like to suggest you fill out your profile to the extent possible so we know more about you and your photography. It helps us help you.

>I currently own a
>Nikon D60, 18-55 and 55-200 kit lenses and a 105 micro 2.8. I
>enjoy doing flower photography and I want to upgrade my
>equipment.

Ok, we've all been there and will be again.

>I was looking at the Nikon 5200 and the 7000.

The D7000 or D7100 are more capable that the D5200 in many respects, but the D7100 is about 50% more expensive.

>I am looking for the best focus possible,

The best possible focus for flowers is frankly manual focus with your camera/lens on a tripod. Moreover, flowers are generally easy to focus on with the center focus point which is a cross point. Just find an edge and either camera, and your D60 will focus beautifully on AF or Manual. I focus all my macro photos using manual.

I would add that when outdoors, a complication may be a breeze, but especially if using a tripod, this can be negated easily and inexpensively. For less than $50 you can purchase an FM Photography's McClamp, or make something similar on your own. I own a couple of these little gems. One of its uses for me is to connect one end to my tripod, and the other gently to the flower's stem to hold it still, while not damaging the flower.

>more clarity at higher ISOs,

This is certainly something that the D7100/D7000 does better than the D5200, which does better than your D60, however, unless you need to bump up your ISO quite a bit, this shouldn't be a big deal. Most of my flower photos are in good sunlight, or I'm using artificial light, such as my R1C1 speedlight for macro flower shots. Regular speed lights, off camera, using low power will work too.

>multiple exposure in camera

Each of the cameras you're looking at have that capability, as far as I know.

>depth of field preview

Of the three cameras (I added the D7100) only the D7000 and the D7100 have this feature, however, I can tell you from experience, especially if you are set at an aperture which closes the lens down a great deal, the image gets so dark in the viewfinder it's very hard to tell if anything is in focus. I rarely use this feature and instead depend upon my DOF knowledge and a little "chimping," looking at my photos on the camera monitor.

>possibly dedicated buttons

The higher up the DSLR food chain you go, the more dedicated controls you have, the fewer times you need to go into the menu system, and the more you're going to pay for the privilege. Dedicated controls make it easier to change settings, and allow you to make such changes more quickly, but they don't actually affect the quality of your photos.

>a weight fairly close to the D60,

The higher up the DSLR food chain, the more the camera will likely weigh. You're only looking at DX camera, and that's good concerning weight, as the FX camera, and their lenses are heavier generally. From the D60 to the D7100 the difference is just 8oz (0.5lbs). The D5200 is only 2oz more than the D60. By size they're all fairly close. The question becomes does 8oz more matter compared to the other differences. It wouldn't to me, but then I carry around a D4 and its heavier lenses.

>and use of all lenses if possible.

The way lenses are being manufactured today, I don't think this is a particularly worrisome missing feature, but as to its answer, the D7000 and D7100 are able to fully run AF lenses, while the D60 and D5200 need AF-S lenses for autofocus.

Today, the new lenses are AF-S. Just this month, for example, the venerable Nikkor AF 80-400mm VR lens was replaced with an AF-S model after many have been waiting for years for the update. Unless you have an old lens in storage which you haven't been able to use, or intend to purchase some older used lenses, this shouldn't be a big deal.

>I also need a great deal of stability to prevent as much camera shake as > >possible as the old hands are not as steady as they used to be!!!! I
>shoot in aperature priority and I need the auto focus.

Your 055XPROB tripod is aluminum with a top tube diameter of about 29mm. It's essentially in the range of ability to hold your camera/lens steady of a Gitzo series 2. Series 2 tripods are recommended through 200mm. Your head wouldn't be one I'd choose, but it's fine. So generally your tripod/head should hold your camera/lenses nicely. If your hands aren't steady, and can therefore move your camera/lens while mounted on the tripod, get a remote shutter release, so when you're all set, you remove the human factor from blurring the shot.

Shooting in aperture priority is an excellent choice for what you're doing. This way you control the depth of field.

As far as auto focus goes, you're likely using the center focus point already so that's good for flowers. What you may not realize is that even in manual focusing, your camera can assist you. That light which goes on and off in your viewfinder works in AF and manual modes. While in manual, we normally want to get that last bit of focus based vision, and having the focus point precisely where we want it, the AF system can still help us do that.

Once your focus is set the way you want, on the precise part of the flower on which you want to focus, you can reframe. If you're in manual focus (There are other ways to do this according to the camera and lenses which can be discussed in another thread.), especially if you're using a remote shutter release, manual focus facilitates precise focus and reframing.

>Would an upgrade in the camera be suggested at this point?

Not necessarily. It may make it easier to make the photos, but I don't think, for the most part, their quality will improve. I do think, based on your questions, and what you've said in the thread, some changes in technique and equipment (remote shutter release) can help you.

>Also, aside from using the macro lens, I find myself using the
>55-200 a majority of the time so I can fill the frame with the
>flower when I am not doing macro. Unfortunately, there are
>many pics the lens won't take perhaps because of the speed or
>focus. Would there be a better lens for that?

The 55-200 isn't the greatest, but optically, it's a nice lens and is capable of making the flowers' photos you desire. To me, as stated above, I think we're looking more at a need for improved technique, and more photographic and practical knowledge about your desired photography.

>By upgrading the camera, do you think it might make a
>difference in the quality of pics I can take?

Not really. There is much more you can do before purchasing a new camera.

Ned
A Nikonians Team Member

-----------------------------
Visit my Travel Photography Blog and my Galleries.

  

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jesse101 Registered since 28th Dec 2011Mon 25-Mar-13 05:05 AM
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#10. "RE: D5200 or D7000"
In response to Reply # 9
Mon 25-Mar-13 05:07 AM by jesse101

Great Falls, US
          

>I am using AF-S Single-Serveo AF
>and Single Point. Is that the correct setting?
>
>Many thanks for the tripod advice.

Brian, Ned and others have already provided excellent advice. However i would like to piggy back on some of their points.

I own a D600..i would like to say it made a world of a difference in my photos, but in reality, it just has some features that i tend to use or like that i could benefit from, but the "actual" photos themselves, are still about par than what i was taking with an old entry level camera (crazy to even say its old lol). the images may be more in detail and i am able to crop more considering the camera's higher MP and DR, but overall...i do like it better.

It is easier for me to focus, or track as what Brian was mentioning..but when i am in AF-S Single servo AF..its all on me at this point, im not gaining much of any benefits, except it does focus faster, it is also FF so i get more in view over my DX formatted cameras. now in low light, yes, there is a difference, and if i am shooting children, playing, jumping around, it tends to help there as well.

I shot all of these with probably a lesser camera than what anybody is mentioning above

http://www.flickr.com/photos/73141335@N06/8086851565/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/73141335@N06/7978856671/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/73141335@N06/7959452182/

i know they could have been better, but i haven't even sold that body yet (d3100). i had to use it twice already. Granted i have used a D300, D700, and a D7000 (actually used the D7000 a lot)..and not once was i set back and blown away by merely switching bodies..but more so when i switched lenses,. jmho.

My Gallery:

http://jessemartinez.zenfolio.com

  

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Ned_L Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge in various areas, especially Travel Photography Charter MemberMon 25-Mar-13 11:48 AM
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#12. "RE: D5200 or D7000"
In response to Reply # 10


Philadelphia, US
          

Jesse, this may be nitpicking, but if your photos are able to show more detail with your D600 than your old entry level DSLR, then I'd be willing to bet you're seeing photos that ultimately look sharper. Even if two photos of the same thing are both in focus, because of the way human vision works, the photo showing more detail will look sharper. To me that means better quality.

Moreover, if you can crop down more, and still have great looking photos, that also indicates to me higher quality.

Back on sharpness for a moment. The two characteristics which are primary in determining whether or not we (humans) determine a photographic image is sharp or not, are resolution and sharpness.

The most familiar characteristic is "resolution." Resolution describes our ability to distinguish between closely spaced elements of detail. Different output media have different potential resolutions. For example, on just about any computer monitor I can think of, to go beyond 125dpi is a complete waste, but that would look downright ugly to us if you made a print at that resolution.

Acutance is frankly less understood, and has nothing to do with resolving detail. Acutance is all about the transition between edges in images, and that recognition has to do with the contrast between them which determines that recognition. That contrast is most often thought to be one of brightness and color differences, but can also be focus differences, in my opinion. (Digital sharpening in software is all about brightness differences.) The more easily we can see a transition, the sharper the image.

So, to be sharp, the image of course must be in focus. But then, the more detail we see in the image, the greater the sharpness too, and that comes from both resolution and acutance. So if we have good edges in our photo to begin with, that will enable us to have acutance, and that will enable the photo to be sharp.

Depth of field can be a two edge sword with regard to sharpness and illustrates the role of contrasting focus more than most photographers think, in my opinion. Contrasting focus, like edge detail accentuates sharpness.

The general rule of thumb in getting a photo sharp is to get it focused well, and it's though to dispute that, but the question becomes, how much focus is good.

Often we use depth of field two ways, and I certainly do this in many instances myself. First in order to offset those times when we might not be in great focus, we use a DOF to give us some leeway on our focus point, by closing down our aperture. Second, in order to, for example, get someone's head wholly in focus, we increase our DOF to take into account the depth of the head. That way we don't have only eyes and a nose in focus, but also the ears.

Except that in some cases, having the ears somewhat out of focus can actually improve the sharpness of the eyes and nose (plus the skin in between, of course). The reason that can happen is acutance. We create a contrast between the "out of focus" and the "in focus" which makes the "in focus" look sharper. Try this out with some portraits and I think you might be surprised. This doesn't always work. For example, in landscape photography, in my opinion, this technique is generally a bad idea.

Ned
A Nikonians Team Member

-----------------------------
Visit my Travel Photography Blog and my Galleries.

  

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jesse101 Registered since 28th Dec 2011Tue 26-Mar-13 03:14 AM
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#17. "RE: D5200 or D7000"
In response to Reply # 12


Great Falls, US
          

As always all great info Ned! I will give that a try when I get some time on my hands. It's been a while since I had a photo session, after tomorrow I should have some time on my hands.

My Gallery:

http://jessemartinez.zenfolio.com

  

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Ned_L Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge in various areas, especially Travel Photography Charter MemberTue 26-Mar-13 03:47 AM
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#19. "RE: D5200 or D7000"
In response to Reply # 17


Philadelphia, US
          

That sounds good.

Ned
A Nikonians Team Member

-----------------------------
Visit my Travel Photography Blog and my Galleries.

  

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tijokjoy Registered since 01st Mar 2013Mon 25-Mar-13 06:06 AM
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#11. "RE: D5200 or D7000"
In response to Reply # 0


Bangalore, IN
          

>I could really use your expert advice. Photography has
>gotten to be a pretty serious hobby for me. I currently own a
>Nikon D60, 18-55 and 55-200 kit lenses and a 105 micro 2.8. I
>enjoy doing flower photography and I want to upgrade my
>equipment. I was looking at the Nikon 5200 and the 7000. I
>am looking for the best focus possible, more clarity at higher
>ISOs, multiple exposure in camera, depth of field preview,
>possibly dedicated buttons, a weight fairly close to the D60,
>and use of all lenses if possible. I also need a great deal
>of stability to prevent as much camera shake as possible as
>the old hands are not as steady as they used to be!!!! I
>shoot in aperature priority and I need the auto focus.
>
>Would an upgrade in the camera be suggested at this point?
>Also, aside from using the macro lens, I find myself using the
>55-200 a majority of the time so I can fill the frame with the
>flower when I am not doing macro. Unfortunately, there are
>many pics the lens won't take perhaps because of the speed or
>focus. Would there be a better lens for that?
>
>By upgrading the camera, do you think it might make a
>difference in the quality of pics I can take?
>
>Thanks so much for your advice.

Hi,
Even i was in a similar kind of Situation recently. But I haven't had an owned a DSLR before but i had used entry level models of Canon & Nikon before my purchase. So it was my First DSLR buy.

I was confused between D5200 & D7000.
What i found with D5200 is that it has everything for a beginner DSLR user, but as you get more serious about photography the user may find it Odd to use it.

why I chose D7000 above D5200 is, Dedicated Control buttons: i didn't like the approach of going to the menu & changing the setting. I preferred changing it on the fly using dedicated buttons.
D7000 is been around for more than 2 years now & i know the cons & pros about it.
I believe as you had been using a DSLR & Knows how to use it. Go for D7000. It will take car of most of your requirements like, "the best focus possible, more clarity at higher ISOs, multiple exposure in camera, depth of field preview ,possibly dedicated buttons, and use of all lenses if possible"


  

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SaltandPep Registered since 10th Dec 2009Mon 25-Mar-13 10:44 PM
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#13. "RE: D5200 or D7000"
In response to Reply # 11


US
          

Ned, Jesse, and all others: Your additional feedback has been so very helpful. I can't tell you how much I appreciate it. I will complete my profile and I thank you so much for all the responses. I am so glad I didn't just go buy new equip. I would have been very disappointed!!! Any good suggestions on how to learn better technique?

Debbie

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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John Bertotti Gold Member Nikonian since 01st Jul 2012Mon 25-Mar-13 11:08 PM
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#14. "RE: D5200 or D7000"
In response to Reply # 13


Garretson, US
          

Books Classes and lots of practice. Keep reading here Ned and BLW and quite a few others seem to always add more that I never even thought of. Several posts in here are going to be copied and pasted to my notes!

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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Ned_L Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge in various areas, especially Travel Photography Charter MemberTue 26-Mar-13 03:11 AM
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#16. "RE: D5200 or D7000"
In response to Reply # 14


Philadelphia, US
          

Thanks for those kind words John. They are appreciated.

Ned
A Nikonians Team Member

-----------------------------
Visit my Travel Photography Blog and my Galleries.

  

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Ned_L Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge in various areas, especially Travel Photography Charter MemberTue 26-Mar-13 03:09 AM
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#15. "RE: D5200 or D7000"
In response to Reply # 13


Philadelphia, US
          

You're very welcome Debbie.

I do have some suggestions.

First, practice, practice, practice.

Some community colleges offer some marvelous courses, and many art schools have night classes in photography which could be very helpful.

If a Nikonians workshop comes to your neck of the woods, sign up. Mike Hagen and his crew are terrific. I know Mike personally, and he's an amazing teacher. If you have a chance for a workshop with him, sign up immediately.

Books can help for basic knowledge, but I think as far as teaching technique well, they can't come close to what you can get from even a one day class or workshop.

If there is a top pro photog near you who offers workshops, that could be helpful.

There are articles here in our resource section which might help.

Good luck on your decision making.

Ned
A Nikonians Team Member

-----------------------------
Visit my Travel Photography Blog and my Galleries.

  

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jesse101 Registered since 28th Dec 2011Tue 26-Mar-13 03:15 AM
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#18. "RE: D5200 or D7000"
In response to Reply # 13


Great Falls, US
          

Anytime, I am more than happy to provide some of my experiences that could hopefully help others. So thank you as well.

Jesse

My Gallery:

http://jessemartinez.zenfolio.com

  

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EZRDRZ Registered since 20th Jan 2013Fri 29-Mar-13 01:24 PM
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#20. "RE: D5200 or D7000"
In response to Reply # 13


GB
          

>Ned, Jesse, and all others: Your additional feedback has
>been so very helpful. I can't tell you how much I appreciate
>it. I will complete my profile and I thank you so much for
>all the responses. I am so glad I didn't just go buy new
>equip. I would have been very disappointed!!! Any good
>suggestions on how to learn better technique?
>
>Debbie

Hi Debbie as a matter of interest what did you go for...or still not decided yet? I would say the D5200 is a good choice for what your needs are. Maybe later get the D7100. I didnt hesitate to get the D7000 after reading the few reviews that I read, however I often think of getting a D5200 simply for the LCD that flips out . But I think the next one for me might be the 'D400'

Regards

  

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