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Subject: "Which method you prefer and why?" Previous topic | Next topic
jesse101 Registered since 28th Dec 2011Sat 05-Jan-13 07:34 PM
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"Which method you prefer and why?"


Great Falls, US
          

I have been playing around with some HDR images..i noticed there are a couple of different techniques that some photogs do, or at least what i have been doing myself.

For instance you have the "in camera" HDR method, to where it snaps either 2 or 3 images and combines them in camera.

then you have the bracketing method, to where you take 3 exposures with options of -3/+3 and so on and able to shoot RAW.

Then you have the option in lightroom to duplicate said RAW images, increase or decrease their exposures then combine in whatever PP software you choose, which i tend to use photoshop.

the easiest method for me has been the lightroom method shooting RAW, as with bracketing you need to have a REAL steady hand or a tripod available, and the "in camera" option seems limited to me, as at times i like to set my exposures a bit differently. But if you prefer a different method or any of the above mentioned, i would like to know why..curious to know if one is in fact better over the other.

Any info will be greatly appreciated,

Jesse

My Gallery:

http://jessemartinez.zenfolio.com

  

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Replies to this topic
Subject Author Message Date ID
Reply message RE: Which method you prefer and why?
somhompho Silver Member
05th Jan 2013
1
Reply message RE: Which method you prefer and why?
jesse101
05th Jan 2013
2
Reply message RE: Which method you prefer and why?
mnbuilder49 Moderator
06th Jan 2013
3
Reply message RE: Which method you prefer and why?
uturn Silver Member
13th Jan 2013
4
     Reply message RE: Which method you prefer and why?
jjjfromcanada
14th Oct 2013
5
Reply message RE: Which method you prefer and why?
esantos Moderator
14th Oct 2013
6
Reply message RE: Which method you prefer and why?
laddad Gold Member
26th Nov 2013
7
Reply message RE: Which method you prefer and why?
PBlais Silver Member
20th Jan 2014
8

somhompho Silver Member Nikonian since 24th Feb 2009Sat 05-Jan-13 10:55 PM
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#1. "RE: Which method you prefer and why?"
In response to Reply # 0


Madison, US
          

Except my iPhone, none of my other cameras have option for HDR. So option 1 is a 'no' for me. Even if I have this choice I will still prefer option 2.

With option 2 you have more data/information to work with, and as you said more control.

I would do option 3, only if have 1 incorrect exposure, and I really need to have that picture for something.

PS- I post a sample my recent HDR yesterday in this forum.

Som
www.HomphoPhotography.com

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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jesse101 Registered since 28th Dec 2011Sat 05-Jan-13 11:23 PM
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#2. "RE: Which method you prefer and why?"
In response to Reply # 1
Sat 05-Jan-13 11:24 PM by jesse101

Great Falls, US
          

Thanks som, makes sense. I just have seem some awesome HDR images taken with all three methods, but it seems that bracketing with RAW images to gain more control is the preferred method.

My Gallery:

http://jessemartinez.zenfolio.com

  

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mnbuilder49 Moderator Awarded for his high level skills in various areas, especially in Interiors Architecture, Landscape and HDR Photography Nikonian since 18th Apr 2006Sun 06-Jan-13 04:07 PM
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#3. "RE: Which method you prefer and why?"
In response to Reply # 0


Lakeville, US
          

Mine are always done with the bracketing method. I believe you get the most dynamic range with that method.
Larry
http://www.larryandersonphotography.com
http://www.andersonmasterbuilders.com

  

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uturn Silver Member Nikonian since 11th Nov 2005Sun 13-Jan-13 08:22 PM
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#4. "RE: Which method you prefer and why?"
In response to Reply # 3


Belleville, CA
          

I have much better results bracketing.

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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jjjfromcanada Registered since 29th Jan 2012Mon 14-Oct-13 08:45 AM
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#5. "RE: Which method you prefer and why?"
In response to Reply # 4


Chaozhou, CN
          

I always use the bracketing method. It's just a lot easier and gives you more data to work with. I've tried the other methods but they're more work and just not as good. Having said that, I'm an HDR newbie and not an expert.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/30889557@N05/sets/

  

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esantos Moderator Nikonians Resources Writer. Recognized for his outstanding reviews on printers and printing articles. Awarded for his high level of expertise in various areas, including Landscape Photography Awarded for his extraordinary accomplishments in Landscape Photography. His work has been exhibited at the Smithsonian. Nikonian since 10th Nov 2002Mon 14-Oct-13 03:56 PM
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#6. "RE: Which method you prefer and why?"
In response to Reply # 0


McAllen, US
          

The one problem with taking one single exposure and increasing and reducing the exposure levels in post is that most HDR programs are written to take into consideration registration differences between images. The programs are generally very good now about lining up small differences in position of one image to another. It is my understanding that without these variations the programs actually produce less than optimal results.

Ernesto Santos
esartprints.com Ernesto Santos Photography

  

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laddad Gold Member Nikonian since 14th Nov 2005Tue 26-Nov-13 04:13 AM
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#7. "RE: Which method you prefer and why?"
In response to Reply # 0
Tue 26-Nov-13 04:15 AM by laddad

Kinston, NC, US
          

Option #3 where one creates several images from one raw image is not truely an HDR image since there is no real "high dynamic range". This is really a Pseudo HDR which creates an effect that looks like HDR. True High Dynamic Range images must include information above and below the mean exposure to increase the "dynamic range". The dynamic range of an image is not expanded when one only uses the data included in a single raw data file.

  

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PBlais Silver Member Nikonian since 19th Jan 2014Mon 20-Jan-14 12:03 AM
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#8. "RE: Which method you prefer and why?"
In response to Reply # 7


Hayes, US
          

The main reason to use multiple images is your eye can see twice as many stops of light as best camera ever made. If you shoot raw images you get more than the JPG normal 8 bits of color. Even the D3100 can capture 10 bits in raw mode and others even more. The combination of this extra data across several exposures is the beauty of HDR. There isn't just one way to do it and they all have a different look. Blending them together is like baking a cake only better. Finding the way you really like has a lot to love. The Nikon in-camera HDR modes are not bad and a good example but real HDR goes a WHOLE lot farther. You just need to get your hands into the dough to cook it up proper. It's the laying of hands to the image that makes it art! Digital is still an art!

  

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Forums Lobby MASTER YOUR TOOLS - Hardware & Software Digital postprocessing & workflow (Public) HDR software & hardware (Public) topic #7561 Previous topic | Next topic


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