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Winterstorm59 Registered since 18th Feb 2012Thu 15-Aug-13 05:02 AM
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"RAW format"


US
          

Hello, Can anyone point me the direction of a good article/thread regarding the Nikon NEF/RAW file format. I need to understand what settings I must select on the camera before shooting and what elements that I can play around with in a photo editing software program. For example, exposure: can a poorly exposed NEW/RAW picture be lightened or darkened. What about WB? Can that be tweaked in later. I guess I understand that almost any photo can be heavily edited in post. I am new at digital editing, especially RAW images. Any help would be very greatly appreciated. Thank you.

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Subject Author Message Date ID
Reply message RE: RAW format
KenLPhotos Gold Member
15th Aug 2013
1
Reply message RE: RAW format
Winterstorm59
17th Aug 2013
8
     Reply message RE: RAW format
KenLPhotos Gold Member
17th Aug 2013
9
          Reply message RE: RAW format
Winterstorm59
20th Aug 2013
14
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aolander Silver Member
15th Aug 2013
2
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esantos Moderator
15th Aug 2013
3
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Winterstorm59
16th Aug 2013
4
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Winterstorm59
16th Aug 2013
5
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kj_fi Silver Member
16th Aug 2013
6
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Winterstorm59
17th Aug 2013
7
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Skyco Silver Member
19th Aug 2013
10
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ESSDEEDEE Silver Member
19th Aug 2013
11
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esantos Moderator
19th Aug 2013
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ESSDEEDEE Silver Member
22nd Aug 2013
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walkerr Administrator
22nd Aug 2013
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Winterstorm59
20th Aug 2013
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ericbowles Moderator
20th Aug 2013
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Skyco Silver Member
20th Aug 2013
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ericbowles Moderator
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MarkM10431 Silver Member
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KenLPhotos Gold Member Nikonian since 26th Jul 2009Thu 15-Aug-13 12:58 PM
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#1. "RE: RAW format"
In response to Reply # 0


Stewartstown, US
          

The answer to all your questions is 'Yes'.
You will need a digital image editor and also a RAW editor for the Nikon NEF raw files. The best 'settings' for the camera is only a good exposure. Then all the digital information is available for post-process.

This may be helpful;
http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials/RAW-file-format.htm

RAW is the way to go if you want to get the best from your digital photography. Keep informed at Nikonians for any more answers or help you need.

Good luck. It is a wonderful journey.

KenL

Visit my Nikonians gallery.



There are many 'images of beautiful objects' but few 'beautiful images of objects'.

  

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Winterstorm59 Registered since 18th Feb 2012Sat 17-Aug-13 08:44 AM
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#8. "RE: RAW format"
In response to Reply # 1


US
          

Thank you Ken for the weblink. The article was fun, informative and lead me to read other articles.

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KenLPhotos Gold Member Nikonian since 26th Jul 2009Sat 17-Aug-13 10:50 AM
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#9. "RE: RAW format"
In response to Reply # 8


Stewartstown, US
          

Looking forward to seeing your work.

KenL

Visit my Nikonians gallery.



There are many 'images of beautiful objects' but few 'beautiful images of objects'.

  

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Winterstorm59 Registered since 18th Feb 2012Tue 20-Aug-13 03:16 AM
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#14. "RE: RAW format"
In response to Reply # 9


US
          

Hello Ken,

Another Ken posted this link to an article that also discussed exposure and the RAW format. Perhaps you would find it interesting.

http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tutorials/optimizing_exposure.shtml

Best,

Nick

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aolander Silver Member Nikonian since 15th Sep 2006Thu 15-Aug-13 01:46 PM
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#2. "RE: RAW format"
In response to Reply # 0


Nevis, US
          

As with any photographic medium, getting the exposure correct is the number one goal. Yes, you can "lighten or darken" images, but if the exposure isn't good you will lose information in the image that may not be recoverable. WB, saturation, contrast, etc. can all be altered in post-processing, but "heavily edited" doesn't mean making a great image out of a poor one.

Alan

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esantos Moderator Nikonians Resources Writer. Recognized for his outstanding reviews on printers and printing articles. Awarded for his high level of expertise in various areas, including Landscape Photography Awarded for his extraordinary accomplishments in Landscape Photography. His work has been exhibited at the Smithsonian. Nikonian since 10th Nov 2002Thu 15-Aug-13 02:43 PM
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#3. "RE: RAW format"
In response to Reply # 0
Thu 15-Aug-13 02:44 PM by esantos

McAllen, US
          

The NEF format allows for a lot of image manipulation without the introduction of image artifacts and degradation. That is not to say one should be sloppy about shooting technique. It is always important to seek the optimal exposure whenever possible. Because the Nikon NEF format is proprietary not all in-camera settings are accessible in post using 3rd party raw converters. If you want full access to the in-camera settings you must use Nikon Capture NX2. If you plan to use something like Lightroom don't be too concerned Adobe has developed an excellent raw converter that will produce just as good output as Capture. Of course, there are other raw converters out there which are also excellent - Photo Ninja being at the top of my list.

If you want to learn all there is to raw conversion I recommend a couple of books. One is Real World Camera Raw with Adobe Photoshop CS5. While this is based on Photoshop CS5 (I don't believe there is one for CS6) it will give you an excellent understanding of raw processing in general. The second book is The Digital Negative written by Jeff Schewe. While not a step-by-step cookbook of sorts, it is a comprehensive manual on basic and advanced techniques using Lightroom and Photoshop's ACR (Adobe Camera Raw) processor.

Ernesto Santos
esartprints.com Ernesto Santos Photography

  

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Winterstorm59 Registered since 18th Feb 2012Fri 16-Aug-13 12:24 AM
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#4. "RE: RAW format"
In response to Reply # 0


US
          

Thank you fellows for your insight and advice. I have been doing a lot of shooting, but not much editing. I know that it is a yo-yo process. Thanks again.

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Winterstorm59 Registered since 18th Feb 2012Fri 16-Aug-13 03:55 AM
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#5. "RE: RAW format"
In response to Reply # 0


US
          

oh, and even though I was not sure about everything regarding RAW, I did not take a chance with the exposure. I made sure that I set the exposure before taking the picture. One can never be too careful.

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kj_fi Silver Member Nikonian since 18th Jul 2007Fri 16-Aug-13 07:08 AM
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#6. "RE: RAW format"
In response to Reply # 5


Vantaa, FI
          

Hi,

like it was said before, when you shoot in RAW, the exposure is practically all you need to worry about -- in addition to the focus and composition, of course. Think a raw image as a non-processed image in the camera. When you shoot JPEG, camera makes all the initial adjustments, including white balance, to the raw image and produces a JEPG file.

The next step is to import the RAW image to a post processing software which is capable of reading the NEF file format. The friibie from Nikon can do that but, in many ways, it is not the best program to touch the pictures or manage your picture gallery. On the other hand, you don't need the latest, full-blown Photoshop to make small adjustments.

Therefore, I recommend that you download and install an evaluation version of Adobe Lightroom and give it a spin for while. It may feel a bit overwhelming at first but in reality, you don't often need to make many adjustments to get your image better than what usually is a JPEG picture right out of the camera. For example, I have noticed that in most of the images I have taken in bright sunlight, the white balance and saturation are quite correct without any adjustments.

You could then start adjusting your image by taking small steps like setting the white balance using a known (or expected) white or gray spot in the image, cropping out unrelevant parts, increasing or decreasing exposure and correcting the tilt.

Please note that the original file is kept unmodified when you adjust it in Lightroom. Lightroom only saves instructions used to change the image. You can also output a JPEG version of the file at correct resolution any time you need to.

You'll quickly learn more while you go. I'm sure you'll find that going the RAW way is the right way, although I must admit that there are a few practical reasons why others might shoot in JPEG (e.g., really short time to get images published).

Best regards,
Kari

  

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Winterstorm59 Registered since 18th Feb 2012Sat 17-Aug-13 12:16 AM
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#7. "RE: RAW format"
In response to Reply # 6


US
          

Thanks Kari, I am an old dog trying to learn new tricks that seem to me to get "updated" at a fairly fast clip - 6 months - 1 year new updates. Yes, I am a believer in the notion that one should shoot RAW, and then taking your best shots and fine tuning them in post. I have Capture NX2 and I will learn to use this one first, since it is a Nikon software for Nikon cameras.

And like Jackie Gleason was fond of saying "And away we go!"

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Skyco Silver Member Nikonian since 12th Mar 2012Mon 19-Aug-13 03:08 AM
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#10. "RE: RAW format"
In response to Reply # 0
Mon 19-Aug-13 03:16 AM by Skyco

Roanoke Island, US
          

>Hello, Can anyone point me the direction of a good
>article/thread regarding the Nikon NEF/RAW file format. I need
>to understand what settings I must select on the camera before
>shooting and what elements that I can play around with in a
>photo editing software program. For example, exposure: can a
>poorly exposed NEW/RAW picture be lightened or darkened. What
>about WB? Can that be tweaked in later. I guess I understand
>that almost any photo can be heavily edited in post. I am new
>at digital editing, especially RAW images. Any help would be
>very greatly appreciated. Thank you.


Hi Nicholas

Raw files are the closest thing we have to working with film in an optical darkroom. JPG files are "baked" in your camera - Raw gives you the ingredients and recipes to get what you want. Yes white balance is totally adjustable.

Also noise and sharpening are much better handled in RAW.

JPG is 8 bit 256 tonal value. A DSLR recording 12 bits of data records 4098 separate tonal values - colors and shades of color. Most of that color information is in the right - the bright side of your histogram.

I over expose to the right (ETTR) to get all the digital info I can out of a raw file and use the "Recovery" slider in my RAW converter to bring the exposure back to "normal". This lets me shoot at a higher ISO with less or no noise and faster shutter speeds for hand holding.

Get to know your camera's histogram and how it relates to your PP software. Don't fear the "blinkes" but do get to know how they translate on your computer. I think most camera's show blinkes before the highlights are really blown out. Again get to know your camera and its histogram and how it works with what you get on your computer.

"The reason why we want to expose every shot that we take with the data as far to the right of the histogram as possible is because that's where the data is! It also is where the visible noise isn't. The visible noise is lurking in the darker stops."
http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tutorials/optimizing_exposure.shtml

http://www.johnshawphoto.com/category/exposure/

I hope this helps.

Warm Well Wishes,

Ken

Visit my Nikonians gallery.



http://www.flickr.com/photos/skyco_g/

"Humans don't rise to the occasion. Instead, we fall to our level of training and experience". Archilochus, a Greek soldier and poet.
The best photo advice I ever received was at a John Shaw workshop. "... Practice your craft... ... Pixels are free...Practice... experiment with your camera".

  

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ESSDEEDEE Silver Member Nikonian since 31st Aug 2010Mon 19-Aug-13 01:57 PM
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#11. "RE: RAW format"
In response to Reply # 10


Thane Maharashtra, IN
          

Hallo I read all the posts But This question may appear silly and basic,PL Excuse me. When I shoot wildlife and birds. I generally shoot in both Raw as well as basic JPEG. but while processing I always find it difficult to process raw files as compared to color appears in JPEGs and I could not get the desired result. I use CS5 and try to use by reading various tutorials.May be my understanding has not up to the mark to understand and gets confused. Can some one explain the flow chart of processing Raw files

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esantos Moderator Nikonians Resources Writer. Recognized for his outstanding reviews on printers and printing articles. Awarded for his high level of expertise in various areas, including Landscape Photography Awarded for his extraordinary accomplishments in Landscape Photography. His work has been exhibited at the Smithsonian. Nikonian since 10th Nov 2002Mon 19-Aug-13 05:06 PM
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#12. "RE: RAW format"
In response to Reply # 11


McAllen, US
          

If you use Nikon Capture NX2 your NEF files will look like the JPG. The reason your NEFs do not look like the JPG is because Photoshop does not have access to the in-camera settings. You can get them very close using the Adobe Camera Profiles in Adobe Camera Raw and additional adjustments.

Ernesto Santos
esartprints.com Ernesto Santos Photography

  

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ESSDEEDEE Silver Member Nikonian since 31st Aug 2010Thu 22-Aug-13 07:38 PM
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#22. "RE: RAW format"
In response to Reply # 12


Thane Maharashtra, IN
          

Thanks for the reply. I tried by using the Adobe Camera Profile but could not workout.Can you give some more explaination. My problem is of getting color adjustment closure to what we see in Jpeg image shot side by side.

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walkerr Administrator Awarded for his con tributed articles published at the Resources Awarded for his in-depth knowledge in multiple areas Nikonian since 05th May 2002Thu 22-Aug-13 07:44 PM
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#23. "RE: RAW format"
In response to Reply # 22


Colorado Springs, US
          

If you're trying to replicate the Nikon color profiles, you need to pick the Camera Standard, Camera Portrait, etc. profiles rather than the Adobe Standard profile. From there, adjust the contrast up or down according to your taste or how you set your camera. If you almost always set your camera a certain way for jpegs, you can make that your default setting. Personally, I'm not that fond of the Nikon color profiles, whether in-camera, in Nikon software or the Adobe versions. I use my own instead.

Rick Walker

My photos:
GeoVista Photography

  

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Winterstorm59 Registered since 18th Feb 2012Tue 20-Aug-13 03:12 AM
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#13. "RE: RAW format"
In response to Reply # 10


US
          

Ken, thank you for your comments and thank you for the link. It has made me rethink how I set the exposure for my shots! Could you please explain to me how to shift the exposure back to the left. I would most grateful. I am using NX2 ver. 2.4.0 and Photoshop CS3.

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ericbowles Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge and high level skills in various areas, especially Landscape and Wildlife Photoghraphy Writer Ribbon awarded for for his article contributions to the community Nikonian since 25th Nov 2005Tue 20-Aug-13 11:16 AM
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#15. "RE: RAW format"
In response to Reply # 13


Atlanta, US
          

I think the key in Ken's comment is understanding which exposure errors create problems. RAW provides more latitude for fixing a problem in exposure of one area of an image, but there can still be problems.

With today's cameras, the dynamic range at low ISO levels is fabulous and makes it relatively unimportant to bias your exposure to avoid shadow noise. The risk with dark areas is you can have noise - especially if you are trying to lighten the dark areas. How you lighten shadows makes a big difference. In Capture NX2, the Shadow Recovery tool is useful, but pushed too far creates excessive noise. D-Lighting in the Camera or in the Develop section tends to be too coarse, but D-Lighting in the Adjust section offers a great deal of latitude for recovery without noise. In the Adjust section, I also willingly use a little noise reduction selectively applied to an area with shadow noise.

Similarly, blown highlights result in featureless areas that seem to jump out of an image - especially when they are white or light. Some blown highlights in reflections might be okay. But blown highlights on your subject or near your subject can be a problem. You might start with recovering highlights in the Develop section of Capture using the highlights slider. But if that does not work, you need to adjust the exposure slider. And both of those techniques don't help much. So then you might move into the Adjust section and use control points, or even the healing brush or cloning.

I find shadow noise a lot easier to manage and fix than blown highlights, so I don't use the "expose to the right" strategy. There are specific images where I will bias exposure - for example a neutral to dark scene might have a lot of room to shift exposure to the right.

I almost never want blown highlights or blinkies unless I know exactly how I will handle post processing. For example, I recently photographed a waterfall where the best composition had a little sky coming through some trees near the top of the falls. My strategy during composition was a plan to replace the sky with a control point to replace the color and then clone out the offending area. This strategy freed me up to expose the falls and rocks correctly.

By the way, you probably want to update your version of Capture to 2.4.3. At some point you might want to update CS3. The selection features in CS are much better with later versions. The Adobe shift to the Creative Cloud has an impact on whether you buy new one more time or subscribe.


Eric Bowles
Nikonians Team
My Gallery
Fall Workshops - Golf Photography at the Tour Championship and Fall Color in the Smokies

Nikonians membership — my most important photographic investment, after the camera

  

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Skyco Silver Member Nikonian since 12th Mar 2012Tue 20-Aug-13 03:13 PM
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#16. "RE: RAW format"
In response to Reply # 13


Roanoke Island, US
          

>Ken, thank you for your comments and thank you for the link.
>It has made me rethink how I set the exposure for my shots!
>Could you please explain to me how to shift the exposure back
>to the left. I would most grateful. I am using NX2 ver. 2.4.0
>and Photoshop CS3.

Your Welcome Nicholas,

I'm glad you liked the info, ETTR is something I am very passionate about. I had a Nikon D100 for several years and my plans to upgrade kept getting kicked down the road by big unexpected medical expenses. I had been shooting RAW for years but ISO 600 was the highest I could go without getting blotchy noise in shadows. At a John Shaw workshop I learned the ETTR technique, and found with the exposure compensation set to +2.3, I could shoot my D100 at 1250 ISO all the time with no noise at all, and much better quality photos! It was like having a new camera - thus my passion.

To answer your question:
Photoshop CS 3 - has a recovery slider which will bring the histogram back to "normal", and you may want to experiment with the exposure and brightness sliders as well depending.

It looks like in NX2 - open edit - and use the brightness, contrast and D-lighting sliders. I haven't used that software so I was bumbling around on an old computer with an old RAW file.

A couple of things to remember, the display on your camera only shows a jpg. "thumbnail" of the "real" RAW file. Also the camera histogram will show highlights blown out - "blinkes" before your highlights are really gone which is why I say "don't fear the blinkes" - but get to know how your camera's histogram compares to your PP software histogram and how much you can recover in RAW conversion. It just takes some experimentation and practice. Start with photos that are average in lighting - avoid high contrast at first. With my D100 learned to recognize lighting situations that were better under exposed just a tad - and leave my exposure comp. set at +2.3

Of course you will want to practice this technique and know what to expect shooting ETTR before taking important photos that matter to you.

This link has an excellent article that goes into detail on this subject.
http://www.digitalphotopro.com/technique/camera-technique/exposing-for-raw.html

I hope this helps and I hope exposing for RAW opens a great new chapter in your photography as it did for me.

Warm Well Wishes,

Ken

Visit my Nikonians gallery.



http://www.flickr.com/photos/skyco_g/

"Humans don't rise to the occasion. Instead, we fall to our level of training and experience". Archilochus, a Greek soldier and poet.
The best photo advice I ever received was at a John Shaw workshop. "... Practice your craft... ... Pixels are free...Practice... experiment with your camera".

  

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ericbowles Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge and high level skills in various areas, especially Landscape and Wildlife Photoghraphy Writer Ribbon awarded for for his article contributions to the community Nikonian since 25th Nov 2005Tue 20-Aug-13 03:48 PM
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#17. "RE: RAW format"
In response to Reply # 16


Atlanta, US
          

Ken makes some good points, but Exposure to the Right is a specific technique that is no longer as important as it was with earlier digital cameras.

The D100 was a very early digital camera. ISO 600 or ISO 1250 were relatively extreme settings. And the early digital cameras did a very poor job of controlling shadow noise, so there was some advantage to avoiding noise and dark shadows.

Today's cameras have dynamic range of nearly 5 stops wider than early cameras. Noise reduction in the camera manages and avoids noticeable noise on most images. Today, there is little need for exposing to the right and few professionals continue to use that approach. It is not used by John Shaw today.

Ken pointed out an important aspect of the LCD - it is using a small embedded JPEG created from your camera's settings. So increases in color or contrast due to camera settings can cause blown highlights that can be removed later. But if you push it too far, you can't recover those details. Blinkies are a little conservative, but they can be a tool to quickly see potential for overexposure and whether it is relevant.

Your post processing software and experience make a big difference. Capture and Lightroom have similar capabilities - and limitations. When you create the image in the camera, you want to know what problems need to be avoided in a given scene, and which can be easily correct with post processing.

Eric Bowles
Nikonians Team
My Gallery
Fall Workshops - Golf Photography at the Tour Championship and Fall Color in the Smokies

Nikonians membership — my most important photographic investment, after the camera

  

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MarkM10431 Silver Member Nikonian since 15th Apr 2013Tue 20-Aug-13 05:49 PM
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#18. "RE: RAW format"
In response to Reply # 17


jacksonville, US
          

does Capture do anything lightroom does not?

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ericbowles Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge and high level skills in various areas, especially Landscape and Wildlife Photoghraphy Writer Ribbon awarded for for his article contributions to the community Nikonian since 25th Nov 2005Tue 20-Aug-13 06:13 PM
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#19. "RE: RAW format"
In response to Reply # 18


Atlanta, US
          

Each program has some small advantages. Someone skilled in either program can use it for 98% of commercial quality work. Almost all the images in my gallery were edited with just Capture NX2.

Capture is particularly good at working with NEF files. It starts by honoring the camera settings - a NEF is exactly the same as a JPEG. A large number of camera settings can be changed after image capture - for example, you can adjust or turn off Active D-Lighting, change picture controls, modify WB selection, or turn off noise reduction. Capture - and the related free program View - share most of this capability.

Capture is a bit unique in the use of selection controls for most edits. You can take any editing step and apply it just to the portion of the image you want - with a range of tools. It's similar to using layers - without messing with layers. And for each editing tool you can also adjust opacity - and make those adjustments of opacity to either luminence or chrominance channels. You can also adjust opacity of just your selection area at the same time you are adjusting opacity of the overall step. These tools are easy and very powerful.

The other key tool in Capture are Control Points. You can apply a point to any part of your image and use the sliders to adjust brightness, contrast, saturation, color channels, color temperature, etc.

Much of Capture was developed by Nik. It integrates fully with Color Efex 3.0 - but not 4.0. Any Color Efex editing step can be applied selectively just like any other editing tool. Other plugins don't always work with Capture, but you can edit in Capture and then use other tools outside of Capture.

Capture is a lossless editor. That means you can always go back to an original file - or any step along the way. And like Lightroom, edits are essentially kept as a list of steps so the file size tends to not bloat excessively.

Capture is relatively inexpensive and they do not release an endless series of upgrades that require additional purchase. The jury is out as to how Lightroom works with their creative cloud.

The disadvantages - Capture needs a full re-write to version 3.0 - and with the purchase of Nik by Google, they are not available to help. Capture does not use most plugins that were developed to the Adobe standards. And Capture is not very good at cloning and does not offer the ability to bring pixels from other images into images. Along those lines, it does not do watermarks.

Lightroom has vastly improved with the last update. If you are Photoshop oriented, most editing can be done in LR and the learning curve is relatively small. Most pros use it because of the minimal learning curve from Photoshop. It's core feature is an image catalog - and it is one of very few choices.


Eric Bowles
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Skyco Silver Member Nikonian since 12th Mar 2012Tue 20-Aug-13 06:38 PM
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#20. "RE: RAW format"
In response to Reply # 17


Roanoke Island, US
          

Hi Eric,

I appreciate your kind words on some of my points and I do mostly agree with what you are saying about ETTR, especially with the cameras we have today. However Nicholas lists a D200 in his equipment and nothing newer so I spent more time sharing my experience with my older camera and information if he wanted to try the same technique.

On my D800 I lean to the bright side of the histogram with my exposure compensation at +.7. Thats still where most of the digital information is. I can under expose if the volume of "blinkies" on my camera display tells me if I'm likely to lose highlight detail in post. I still like to keep my camera histogram lumped mostly a little right of center. A force of habit I recon.

Please let me be clear to every one that I am not telling people to disregard the camera's warnings of over exposure. But to understand (especially with ETTR) how the camera's histogram is going to look in their PP software. And practice and experiment enough to have a good feel for it in the field.

John Shaw may not practice ETTR like he used to, but in a Dec. '12 blog he mentions bracketing ETTR on his D800E when it might come in handy.
http://www.johnshawphoto.com/category/exposure/

I guess once ETTR is in your blood its kind of hard to shake it.

Warm Well Wishes,

Ken

Visit my Nikonians gallery.



http://www.flickr.com/photos/skyco_g/

"Humans don't rise to the occasion. Instead, we fall to our level of training and experience". Archilochus, a Greek soldier and poet.
The best photo advice I ever received was at a John Shaw workshop. "... Practice your craft... ... Pixels are free...Practice... experiment with your camera".

  

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ericbowles Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge and high level skills in various areas, especially Landscape and Wildlife Photoghraphy Writer Ribbon awarded for for his article contributions to the community Nikonian since 25th Nov 2005Tue 20-Aug-13 06:51 PM
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#21. "RE: RAW format"
In response to Reply # 20


Atlanta, US
          

Thanks for the clarification. That makes sense. The D200 has more than 2 stops less dynamic range than a current camera, and certainly has more noise in shadows at higher ISO levels.

As you suggest - and I agree - there is an art to the optimal exposure for a given scene. It needs to consider the camera, post processing planned, and the alternatives involved. Bracketing is a very good option.

Eric Bowles
Nikonians Team
My Gallery
Fall Workshops - Golf Photography at the Tour Championship and Fall Color in the Smokies

Nikonians membership — my most important photographic investment, after the camera

  

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Winterstorm59 Registered since 18th Feb 2012Sun 08-Sep-13 01:19 AM
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#24. "RE: RAW format"
In response to Reply # 21


US
          

Thank you everyone for a great introduction to the issue of "correct" exposure settings. The links were helpful and discussion thread was also quite informative. Now I just need to get out there and play around some more.

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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Skyco Silver Member Nikonian since 12th Mar 2012Sun 08-Sep-13 03:52 AM
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#25. "RE: RAW format"
In response to Reply # 24
Sun 08-Sep-13 05:40 PM by Skyco

Roanoke Island, US
          

>Thank you everyone for a great introduction to the issue of
>"correct" exposure settings. The links were helpful
>and discussion thread was also quite informative. Now I just
>need to get out there and play around some more.

Hi Nicholas.

That's what it takes - practice. I spent a month learning how to expose for all that I could get from RAW and not blow out the highlights. That part is really important. As I said earlier stay away from high contrast subjects at first and take lots of photos in the mid range light until you can anticipate the results you'll be getting. Learn your camera's histogram and what you really get when your image is in the PP software on your computer.

Warm Well Wishes,

Enjoy your craft.

Ken

Visit my Nikonians gallery.



http://www.flickr.com/photos/skyco_g/

"Humans don't rise to the occasion. Instead, we fall to our level of training and experience". Archilochus, a Greek soldier and poet.
The best photo advice I ever received was at a John Shaw workshop. "... Practice your craft... ... Pixels are free...Practice... experiment with your camera".

  

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