nikonians

Even though we ARE Nikon lovers,we are NOT affiliated with Nikon Corp. in any way.

| |
Go to a  "printer friendly" view of this message which allow an easy print Print Go to the page which allows you to send this topic link and a message to a friend Email this topic to a friend
Forums Lobby MASTER YOUR TOOLS - Hardware & Software Digital postprocessing & workflow (Public) topic #67562
View in linear mode

Subject: "Relationship between subject and print size" Previous topic | Next topic
ericbowles Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge and high level skills in various areas, especially Landscape and Wildlife Photoghraphy Writer Ribbon awarded for for his article contributions to the community Nikonian since 25th Nov 2005Sat 27-Jul-13 02:25 PM
9002 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
"Relationship between subject and print size"


Atlanta, US
          

How does the subject influence your choice of print size?

Many of the old masters of photography made relatively small prints. Part of that was the technology of the day, and the expense of making a large print. But part is the size that works best for the subject.

How do you think about the optimum size of a print? Of course, viewing distance is part of that thought process. And so does the size of the intended display space. But what else is involved?

I find that landscapes - particularly big landscapes - need a larger print. Small birds tend to work better as small to medium sized prints, while large birds tend to need larger prints. But wildlife tends to overwhelm the viewer if it is presented in too large a print. Do you really want a very large print of a buck with antlers on your wall? And macro (especially semi abstract) seems to work well with large prints but close ups of flowers work better as medium prints.



Eric Bowles
Nikonians Team
My Gallery
Fall Workshops - Golf Photography at the Tour Championship and Fall Color in the Smokies

Nikonians membership — my most important photographic investment, after the camera

  

Alert Print | Reply | Quote | Top

Replies to this topic

esantos Moderator Nikonians Resources Writer. Recognized for his outstanding reviews on printers and printing articles. Awarded for his high level of expertise in various areas, including Landscape Photography Awarded for his extraordinary accomplishments in Landscape Photography. His work has been exhibited at the Smithsonian. Nikonian since 10th Nov 2002Sat 27-Jul-13 10:15 PM
11950 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#1. "RE: Relationship between subject and print size"
In response to Reply # 0


McAllen, US
          

Eric,

Everything you say makes total sense. I would add that viewing distance is VERY important. I tend to think that if the image is simple in detail it works when printed large and can be viewed at close distance if it is sharp. The viewer can become immersed in the print up close and this works very well to stir emotions. Think of a close up of a flower, with say, a butterfly, or some other insect, or even a hummingbird. On the other hand, I find that landscapes with a lot of detail don't work if there isn't enough space to step back and take it all in. The viewer obviously needs to see the whole image to make sense of it, at least initially. Occasionally I've seen some landscape prints that contain enough interesting detail that you can still enjoy it viewing up close, but those are rare.

Ernesto Santos
esartprints.com Ernesto Santos Photography

  

Alert Print | Reply | Quote | Top

Forums Lobby MASTER YOUR TOOLS - Hardware & Software Digital postprocessing & workflow (Public) topic #67562 Previous topic | Next topic