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Forums Lobby MASTER YOUR TOOLS - Hardware & Software Digital postprocessing & workflow (Public) topic #67438
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Subject: "Adobe Products" Previous topic | Next topic
unclemikey Platinum Member Nikonian since 29th Apr 2013Fri 07-Jun-13 04:44 PM
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"Adobe Products"


Henrico, US
          

I am an absolute nuube regarding post production processing and am very confused by the references to the Adobe products. I don't understand the differences between Lightroom, Elements and Photoshop. Also there is something called Camera Raw.

Would someone please direct me to information that explains the differences or inform me what I need to know or understand.

Thanks in advance and I'm not sure this is the correct Forum for this question.

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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Replies to this topic
Subject Author Message Date ID
Reply message RE: Adobe Products
esantos Moderator
07th Jun 2013
1
Reply message RE: Adobe Products
unclemikey Platinum Member
07th Jun 2013
2
Reply message RE: Adobe Products
danshep Silver Member
07th Jun 2013
3
Reply message RE: Adobe Products
unclemikey Platinum Member
07th Jun 2013
4

esantos Moderator Nikonians Resources Writer. Recognized for his outstanding reviews on printers and printing articles. Awarded for his high level of expertise in various areas, including Landscape Photography Awarded for his extraordinary accomplishments in Landscape Photography. His work has been exhibited at the Smithsonian. Nikonian since 10th Nov 2002Fri 07-Jun-13 07:41 PM
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#1. "RE: Adobe Products"
In response to Reply # 0


McAllen, US
          

Let's start with the granddaddy, Photoshop. Photoshop is often called a pixel editor. This means that the program has the capacity to manipulate color values, tone, and image details at the smallest level. It has the ability to make these edits non-destructively by using a layer system. Much like the layers of transparencies you would find in those anatomy textbooks. You can turn those layers on and off, you can adjust their opacity and you can also paint in masks to limit the layer effect to any part of the image. Photoshop also contains a multitude of special effects tools. They are too many to list and describe here, let's just say they round out the tool chest for the graphics professional to the level that just about any effect is possible.

Photoshop Elements is a pared down version of Photoshop sold at a more economical price. It also uses wizards and presets to help the novice. While some claim that Elements can do 90% of what Photoshop can, I have always felt that when you need professional results Elements will leave you somewhat wanting. Additionally, the majority of Elements features and tools only work in an 8-bit color environment while the majority of Photoshop functions within a 16-bit color environment. This can be a significant limitation when dealing with high resolution images that must maintain a high level of quality. Heavy edits on an 8-bit color file can easily introduce artifacts and image degradation.

Lightroom is a combination of image ingestion tool, image cataloging and rating system, image editor, and output generator. It uses some of the basic image editing tools developed in Photoshop but the program was design from inception to be strictly a photographer's tool. Experienced users of Lightroom claim that they can perform over 95% of all their image editing chores in Lightroom and may only use Photoshop for very detailed processes.

Adobe Camera Raw or ACR is Adobe's raw file converter. A raw file is not an image file, it is simply the raw data taken directly from the camera's image sensor. A raw file cannot be viewed as an image until this raw data is demosaic'ed into color values and those values arranged in the traditional RGB format used by image formats. ACR, while predominantly a converter is also an editor. It allows you to adjust the raw values to address contrast, color, tone, color temperature (white balance), etc. Once you make those edits using a preview image for reference you must then convert the file to an image file.

Ernesto Santos
esartprints.com Ernesto Santos Photography

  

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unclemikey Platinum Member Nikonian since 29th Apr 2013Fri 07-Jun-13 08:43 PM
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#2. "RE: Adobe Products"
In response to Reply # 1


Henrico, US
          

>Let's start with the granddaddy, Photoshop. Photoshop is
>often called a pixel editor. This means that the program has
>the capacity to manipulate color values, tone, and image
>details at the smallest level. It has the ability to make
>these edits non-destructively by using a layer system. Much
>like the layers of transparencies you would find in those
>anatomy textbooks. You can turn those layers on and off, you
>can adjust their opacity and you can also paint in masks to
>limit the layer effect to any part of the image. Photoshop
>also contains a multitude of special effects tools. They are
>too many to list and describe here, let's just say they round
>out the tool chest for the graphics professional to the level
>that just about any effect is possible.
>
>Photoshop Elements is a pared down version of Photoshop sold
>at a more economical price. It also uses wizards and presets
>to help the novice. While some claim that Elements can do 90%
>of what Photoshop can, I have always felt that when you need
>professional results Elements will leave you somewhat wanting.
>Additionally, the majority of Elements features and tools only
>work in an 8-bit color environment while the majority of
>Photoshop functions within a 16-bit color environment. This
>can be a significant limitation when dealing with high
>resolution images that must maintain a high level of quality.
>Heavy edits on an 8-bit color file can easily introduce
>artifacts and image degradation.
>
>Lightroom is a combination of image ingestion tool, image
>cataloging and rating system, image editor, and output
>generator. It uses some of the basic image editing tools
>developed in Photoshop but the program was design from
>inception to be strictly a photographer's tool. Experienced
>users of Lightroom claim that they can perform over 95% of all
>their image editing chores in Lightroom and may only use
>Photoshop for very detailed processes.
>
>Adobe Camera Raw or ACR is Adobe's raw file converter. A raw
>file is not an image file, it is simply the raw data taken
>directly from the camera's image sensor. A raw file cannot be
>viewed as an image until this raw data is demosaic'ed into
>color values and those values arranged in the traditional RGB
>format used by image formats. ACR, while predominantly a
>converter is also an editor. It allows you to adjust the raw
>values to address contrast, color, tone, color temperature
>(white balance), etc. Once you make those edits using a
>preview image for reference you must then convert the file to
>an image file.
>
>

Ernesto,

Thank you for the clarification at least of the difference between the three programs. This does help me to sort things out some. Now, I just have to learn how to use them. I am taking a class this summer in Photoshop at the University of Richmond in July. Don't know how detailed it is but at least for me it will be a start.

What would you recommend to someone who shoots mostly in .jpeg?

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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danshep Silver Member Charter MemberFri 07-Jun-13 08:48 PM
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#3. "RE: Adobe Products"
In response to Reply # 0


Olympia, US
          


One option you might consider, is to buy a book on Lightroom, for example.

Ernesto's information is right on. Reading about Lightroom would give you info on organizing your photos, it mentions JPG and RAW, and of course, instructs you on all the features.

You can also download Lightroom free for 30 days to evaluate.



"Today is the tomorrow that yesterday you spent money like there was no"

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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unclemikey Platinum Member Nikonian since 29th Apr 2013Fri 07-Jun-13 10:00 PM
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#4. "RE: Adobe Products"
In response to Reply # 3
Fri 07-Jun-13 10:01 PM by unclemikey

Henrico, US
          

>
>One option you might consider, is to buy a book on Lightroom,
>for example.
>
>Ernesto's information is right on. Reading about Lightroom
>would give you info on organizing your photos, it mentions JPG
>and RAW, and of course, instructs you on all the features.
>
>You can also download Lightroom free for 30 days to evaluate.
>
>
>


>"Today is the tomorrow that yesterday you spent money
>like there was no"
>
>Visit
>my
>Nikonians gallery>.



I have a copy of Scott Kelby's Light Room 4.

Do I download that from Adobe's website?

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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