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Subject: "How do programs designed to reduce noice in photos work..." Previous topic | Next topic
rvd51 Registered since 11th Nov 2011Mon 19-Nov-12 02:37 PM
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"How do programs designed to reduce noice in photos work?"


Bartlesville, US
          

I know there will be a vast opinion, but which one do you prefer if one is used. Is one actually better than the next ?

Thank you in advance

RDeal

  

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Subject Author Message Date ID
Reply message RE: How do programs designed to reduce noice in photos ...
Aqualung Silver Member Awarded for his technical proficiency and numerous positive critiques over several years, most notably in the Sports forum
19th Nov 2012
1
Reply message RE: How do programs designed to reduce noice in photos ...
blw Moderator Awarded for his high level of expertise in various areas
20th Nov 2012
2
Reply message RE: How do programs designed to reduce noice in photos ...
ericbowles Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge and high level skills in various areas, especially Landscape and Wildlife Photoghraphy Writer Ribbon awarded for for his article contributions to the community
20th Nov 2012
3
Reply message RE: How do programs designed to reduce noice in photos ...
esantos Moderator Nikonians Resources Writer. Recognized for his outstanding reviews on printers and printing articles. Awarded for his high level of expertise in various areas, including Landscape Photography Awarded for his extraordinary accomplishments in Landscape Photography. His work has been exhibited at the Smithsonian.
22nd Nov 2012
4
Reply message RE: How do programs designed to reduce noice in photos ...
Bob32 Silver Member
23rd Nov 2012
5
     Reply message RE: How do programs designed to reduce noice in photos ...
ericbowles Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge and high level skills in various areas, especially Landscape and Wildlife Photoghraphy Writer Ribbon awarded for for his article contributions to the community
23rd Nov 2012
6
     Reply message RE: How do programs designed to reduce noice in photos ...
Bob32 Silver Member
23rd Nov 2012
8
     Reply message RE: How do programs designed to reduce noice in photos ...
walkerr Administrator Awarded for his con tributed articles published at the Resources Awarded for his in-depth knowledge in multiple areas Donor Ribbon awarded for his very generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014
23rd Nov 2012
7
          Reply message RE: How do programs designed to reduce noice in photos ...
Bob32 Silver Member
23rd Nov 2012
9
               Reply message RE: How do programs designed to reduce noice in photos ...
blw Moderator Awarded for his high level of expertise in various areas
09th Dec 2012
11
Reply message RE: How do programs designed to reduce noice in photos ...
dagoldst Silver Member
03rd Dec 2012
10

Aqualung Silver Member Awarded for his technical proficiency and numerous positive critiques over several years, most notably in the Sports forum Charter MemberMon 19-Nov-12 05:49 PM
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#1. "RE: How do programs designed to reduce noice in photos work?"
In response to Reply # 0
Mon 19-Nov-12 05:49 PM by Aqualung

near Boston, US
          

Several years ago when I was shooting the D80/D200, I would use Neat Image; for indoor sports it was a mandatory part of my workflow. Other folks swore by Noise Ninja or others (see this writeup)

Personally, I find the NR in LR4 (Adobe Camera RAW) to be outstanding, and haven't used Neat Image in several years.

Chris
=====
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Olympus OM-D EM-1, Olympus 12-40ƒ2.8, Panasonic Leica 25mmƒ1.4


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Visit my Nikonians gallery.

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blw Moderator Awarded for his high level of expertise in various areas Nikonian since 18th Jun 2004Tue 20-Nov-12 12:01 PM
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#2. "RE: How do programs designed to reduce noice in photos work?"
In response to Reply # 0


Richmond, US
          

I once - that would be around 2007-2010 - used Neat Image. It was considerably better than Photoshop at the time, and both were far better than what came out of the camera's JPEG engine. I tested both Neat Image and Noise Ninja at the time and I cannot remember why I ended up with Neat Image but it wasn't due to results; rather it had something to do with licensing or purchase logistics or something like that.

Roll forward to 2012. Lightroom4 now has quite good noise reduction. It probably isn't quite as good as Neat Image was, but call it 95% of the way there. So no need for Neat Image. I occasionally have a need to be more aggressive on NR than I can reasonably do with LR4, and then I use Topaz DeNoise. It has more control than LR, and as a Photoshop plug-in it is much easier to apply to limited areas of the frame. I probably use DeNoise only once a month, though.

_____
Brian... a bicoastal Nikonian and Team Member

My gallery is online. Comments and critique welcomed any time!

  

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ericbowles Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge and high level skills in various areas, especially Landscape and Wildlife Photoghraphy Writer Ribbon awarded for for his article contributions to the community Nikonian since 25th Nov 2005Tue 20-Nov-12 07:52 PM
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#3. "RE: How do programs designed to reduce noice in photos work?"
In response to Reply # 0


Atlanta, US
          

I'm in a similar position to Brian. As software has improved, I'm using Capture NX2 for almost all my noise reduction. The noise reduction capability is pretty good. Sometimes I'll simply use Gaussian Blur instead. The key to my use of both of these tools is how they are integrated with other post processing including sharpening.

I almost always apply NR selectively - just to the areas of the image where it is really required. I try to limit using sharpening that creates noise such as heavy use of Tonal Contrast. And I am more likely to use sizing to my advantage - I'll remove noise using a light setting before upsizing or downsizing (if even necessary). I also try to make sure both that I don't sharpen the noise so I remove noise before sharpening and may go through several iterations with different types of sharpening to specific areas of an image.

Eric Bowles
Nikonians Team
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esantos Moderator Nikonians Resources Writer. Recognized for his outstanding reviews on printers and printing articles. Awarded for his high level of expertise in various areas, including Landscape Photography Awarded for his extraordinary accomplishments in Landscape Photography. His work has been exhibited at the Smithsonian. Nikonian since 10th Nov 2002Thu 22-Nov-12 05:37 PM
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#4. "RE: How do programs designed to reduce noice in photos work?"
In response to Reply # 0


McAllen, US
          

If you use Lightroom or Camera Raw to de-noise your images it is a good idea to add a small amount of grain to counter the excessive smoothing (plastic'ing) that noise reduction can create. This is a neat little tip that really works.

Ernesto Santos
esartprints.com Ernesto Santos Photography

  

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Bob32 Silver Member Nikonian since 29th Jul 2007Fri 23-Nov-12 02:26 PM
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#5. "RE: How do programs designed to reduce noice in photos work?"
In response to Reply # 4


Chico, US
          

Ernesto,

I'm puzzled why you would add grain. In ACR, for example, wouldn't it be better simply to move the Luminance slider far enough to eliminate most of the noise but still leave a small amount of residual noise?

Bob

  

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ericbowles Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge and high level skills in various areas, especially Landscape and Wildlife Photoghraphy Writer Ribbon awarded for for his article contributions to the community Nikonian since 25th Nov 2005Fri 23-Nov-12 04:14 PM
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#6. "RE: How do programs designed to reduce noice in photos work?"
In response to Reply # 5


Atlanta, US
          

Grain is color neutral while noise in digital images often has color. If you leave the noise, you may be leaving some color noise as well. Adding grain instead removes all the color noise and just adds texture.

Eric Bowles
Nikonians Team
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Bob32 Silver Member Nikonian since 29th Jul 2007Fri 23-Nov-12 04:55 PM
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#8. "RE: How do programs designed to reduce noice in photos work?"
In response to Reply # 6


Chico, US
          

Eric,

When you use the Luminance slider to reduce noise you also normally move the Color slider to remove color noise. Wouldn't any residual noise be free of color noise?

Bob

  

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walkerr Administrator Awarded for his con tributed articles published at the Resources Awarded for his in-depth knowledge in multiple areas Donor Ribbon awarded for his very generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Nikonian since 05th May 2002Fri 23-Nov-12 04:25 PM
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#7. "RE: How do programs designed to reduce noice in photos work?"
In response to Reply # 5


Colorado Springs, US
          

You have more control over the size of grain that you artificially add than what you would find naturally occurring with noise. That allows you the freedom to add some "bite" to photos that works well with your subject and doesn't detract from it.

Rick Walker

My photos:
GeoVista Photography

  

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Bob32 Silver Member Nikonian since 29th Jul 2007Fri 23-Nov-12 05:07 PM
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#9. "RE: How do programs designed to reduce noice in photos work?"
In response to Reply # 7


Chico, US
          

Rick,

I'm been so involved through the years reducing noise from high ISO shots of sports events that I have never once considered adding back grain to images! I'm not even sure that Elements 10 which I use has the capacity to do it. I'll have to research the subject.

Bob

  

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blw Moderator Awarded for his high level of expertise in various areas Nikonian since 18th Jun 2004Sun 09-Dec-12 08:08 PM
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#11. "RE: How do programs designed to reduce noice in photos work?"
In response to Reply # 9


Richmond, US
          

> I'm been so involved through the years reducing noise from high ISO shots of sports events that I have never once considered adding back grain to images!

It's not so much that you want the grain, it's that adding it can disguise the noise that remains, since it looks more "realistic." Also, one of the issues with noise-reduction software is that a lot of it tends to make flat surfaces look "plastic-y." Adding a *little* grain to them corrects the "plastic surface" look. It would have been better to have had some actual captured detail there, but in many cases there either wasn't any or is so far away that you can't really capture it. A great example of this is a particular green outfield wall that I've got in probably 2000 images. Since I'm shooting from the stands near the infield, and wide open at either f/4 or f/2.8 (and yes at high ISO, depending on camera), there is no detail captured out there. Noise reduction just makes it look bad. So adding a little grain into it makes it look like I used an older high speed film, rather than "plastic digital toy" which is what that otherwise might look like.

_____
Brian... a bicoastal Nikonian and Team Member

My gallery is online. Comments and critique welcomed any time!

  

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dagoldst Silver Member Nikonian since 02nd Dec 2012Mon 03-Dec-12 12:06 AM
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#10. "RE: How do programs designed to reduce noice in photos work?"
In response to Reply # 0


Little Rock, US
          

Like others, I switched to Lightroom 4 and personally, I have not looked back. It is the best I have used in maintaining color accuracy, detail AND performing noise reduction. For me, it is as if Adobe added 1.5 stops to my current camera, the D200. On my wife's D3100, it performs well up to 6400. For cost/value benefit, LR4 is hard to beat.

I might add, I am looking forward to using it on a soon to be purchased D600, and from what I can tell between sample images I have downloaded and my own RAW images from 3 different generations of Nikon DSLR, I can get the same sort of "look" to my shots from my standard workflow.

David

"Sawed that board three times and it is still too short... "

  

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