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Forums Lobby MASTER YOUR TOOLS - Hardware & Software Digital postprocessing & workflow (Public) topic #66387
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Subject: "Help understanding moire etc" Previous topic | Next topic
SheriB Silver Member Awarded for sharing her exceptional images and details of rural farm life. Nikonian since 11th Sep 2010Thu 16-Feb-12 09:02 PM
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"Help understanding moire etc"


US
          

At least I assume that is what I am seeing..On some of my images, when I view them (ViewNX2, RAW,) I can see areas that look out of focus, blurred.These are usually areas where there are repeating patterns, such as tree lines , grass, and bright fall leaves. But from what I am reading I am not sure that is my problem because if I blow the image up to 100% they 'clean up',looking ok, until I let it go back to the default size.. Now if I resize/convert to a jpeg many times the blur is still there, but not always.
Can someone point me to a good article ( no videos please..26.4Kbps dial up connection..not even 56K ) to help me understand what moire is?? Or is this a color aberration issue? ( and I still have very little understanding of those terms)

Sheri Becker

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esantos Moderator Nikonians Resources Writer. Recognized for his outstanding reviews on printers and printing articles. Awarded for his high level of expertise in various areas, including Landscape Photography Awarded for his extraordinary accomplishments in Landscape Photography. His work has been exhibited at the Smithsonian. Nikonian since 10th Nov 2002Thu 16-Feb-12 09:56 PM
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#1. "RE: Help understanding moire etc"
In response to Reply # 0


McAllen, US
          

Hi Sheri,

Moire is the result of artifacting from the camera when it is unable to resolve tight patterns accurately. It is rare with high quality 35mm digital cameras but it does exist in some instances. It is also referred to as aliasing. Here is an example of the artifacts that can develop when the camera is having a hard time resolving a tight pattern.

http://www.philborges.com/blog/2011/09/01/moire-patterns-with-the-mark-ii-5d/

What I think may be happening in your case is that you are viewing your images at an odd zoom percentage. Your monitor does not have the resolution to take an image and display it at a view percentage that is not an even fraction of 100%. Try viewing your images at 10, 20, 25, 50, 75% and so on. If you have the zoomed view set at something like 36.4% this may be the problem. That is why this softness goes away when you view the image at 100% view.

Ernesto Santos
esartprints.com Ernesto Santos Photography

  

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adangus Silver Member Nikonian since 02nd Jan 2009Sat 18-Feb-12 02:33 AM
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#2. "RE: Help understanding moire etc"
In response to Reply # 0


Franktown, US
          

Moiré patterns arise when there are two very regular patterns that overlay one another. In the case of digital photos, one of the patterns is the repeating array of pixels in the sensor in the camera. Another might be, for example, a pin-stripe in a suit, an array of windows and columns in a high rise tower, or something similar.

From what you're describing, it is unlikely to be moiré. I don't think that the tree lines, grass, or leaves have the necessary degree of regularity to give rise to moiré.

Without any further examples, I'd agree with Ernesto's suggestion. In many s/w packages, outside of Photoshop CS5 or CS5.1, you may see such artifacts at anything but a binary multiple or factor of 100%. So, a 50% view will be OK, but a 32% or 45% view will not. This has nothing to do with the quality of the file. It has to do with how the software interpolates the pixels for image reductions involves non-binary fractions.

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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barrywesthead Silver Member Awareded for his continued support of the Nikonians community, freely sharing his expertise, particularly in the areas of digital post processing and printing. Nikonian since 07th Nov 2006Sun 19-Feb-12 01:40 PM
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#3. "RE: Help understanding moire etc"
In response to Reply # 0
Sun 19-Feb-12 02:19 PM by barrywesthead

Kleinburg, CA
          

It could be an interference pattern caused by a repetitive pattern in the image being close to the dot pattern of your screen, in which case it would be correctly labeled a moiré effect. This is why changing the zoom affects the pattern.

What quality is your monitor and what screen resolution is your computer set at? Typically, at what zoom level do you see normally the effect?

Do any of the images in your gallery have this symptom?

Regarding color aberration -- do you mean chromatic aberration, which would manifest as red or blue fringes around objects and would be more visible at higher zoom levels (i.e. zoomed in) and would not disappear except possibly at lower zooms where they would be too small to notice.

My condolences on the dial-up connection.

Barry
http://art2printimages.com

  

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Forums Lobby MASTER YOUR TOOLS - Hardware & Software Digital postprocessing & workflow (Public) topic #66387 Previous topic | Next topic