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Forums Lobby MASTER YOUR TOOLS - Hardware & Software Digital postprocessing & workflow (Public) topic #66272
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Subject: "DXO Optics?" Previous topic | Next topic
regaladosantos Registered since 12th Dec 2011Tue 13-Dec-11 02:05 PM
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"DXO Optics?"


Allen, US
          

Hello everyone. I've had my D5000 for a year now, my first DSLR and also have been using ViewNX2 which came free with the camera. Despite the fact that I probably need to learn more about post processing, I think I would like to move on.

I have read about DXO Optics but now am wondering if it is even worth it. From forums and other people I talk to, it that Lightroom 3 and/or Elements 10 are good. If there are any DXO Optics users out there, I would like to hear actual testimonials or comparissons to other tools.

Since I am new to this, ViewNX2 is my only basis. I am a mac user and I shoot raw. I understand that Aperture and Lightroom3 are pretty similar and are good cataloging tools-their best feature. I guess I'm not really looking for something like what Elements can do but just for tweaking, to cover up my mistakes in photography, if that's even possible.

  

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ericbowles Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge and high level skills in various areas, especially Landscape and Wildlife Photoghraphy Writer Ribbon awarded for for his article contributions to the community Nikonian since 25th Nov 2005Wed 21-Dec-11 12:39 PM
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#1. "RE: DXO Optics?"
In response to Reply # 0


Atlanta, US
          

Sounds like you are at the evaluation stage and looking at a bit of everything. I'll try to simplify a bit.

You need to make a fundamental choice on an Adobe centric workflow or a Nikon centric workflow. If you want to do a lot of cutting portions of one image and putting them in another image, Adobe is your choice. If you are using a lot of plug ins, ADobe is your choice. And if you are int eh graphics field or working primarily for publication, Adobe is your choice. Otherwise, you can use a Nikon centric workflow or simply choose Adobe out of personal preference.

The core product for an Adobe centric workflow is Lightroom. It is an excellent cataloging tool and helps to organize images. It has increasingly become a good editor. Lightroom essentially replicates camera settings with its own version or settings you prefer. Lightroom is an Adobe product, so it tends to work well with Photoshop, Elements, and lots of plugins.

The core products for a Nikon centric workflow are View NX2 and Capture NX2. The Nikon products use your actual camera settings - and you can change many of those settings in post processing. There is no catalog - you use a conventional file and folder structure. Through association with Nik, Capture offers a lot of control in selective editing - meaning you can apply edits just to the skin or just to an eye without creating masks. That makes Capture very easy and fast. All edit steps to NEF files are automatically non-destructive - meaning you can go back and change any step at any time or even start fresh with your original. You can also keep versions. All this editing is done with only minor increases in file size. The NEF file remains with all your edits and versions so you are not keeping copies of files.

DXO Optics is unrelated. It is from Phase One. DXO is a good RAW editor and has some nice functions for shadow recovery. It used to have significant advantages with correction and shadow recovery but at this point those advantages are not that important for most Nikon photographers using Nikon products.

Aperture is the Apple counterpart to Lightroom. It is more of a catalog with some editing capability rather than an advanced editor.

Your choices are pretty easy. With a Nikon flow you will use View for 80-90%+ of your work and Capture for advanced edits. You might occasionally still use Photoshop for 1% of your images.

You can largely achieve the same results with Lightroom. In that case you would use Lightroom for 95%+ of your work and you might occasionally use Elements or Photoshop for specific needs.

We've done some side by side testing and both workflows produce excellent results. Many of us find the user interface of View/Capture is preferred. And many others prefer the Adobe/Lightroom/Photoshop workflow and working with a company that is a software company first and foremost.

At this stage, I would keep it simple. Pick either Lightroom or View+Capture. With either approach, plan to invest some time learning the product and its capabilities. Take some classes after 30-90 days of use. Either choice can probably handle 98%+ of your needs.


Eric Bowles
Nikonians Team
My Gallery
Workshops

Nikonians membership — my most important photographic investment, after the camera

  

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regaladosantos Registered since 12th Dec 2011Thu 22-Dec-11 05:20 AM
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#2. "RE: DXO Optics?"
In response to Reply # 1


Allen, US
          

>Sounds like you are at the evaluation stage and looking at a
>bit of everything. I'll try to simplify a bit.
>
>You need to make a fundamental choice on an Adobe centric
>workflow or a Nikon centric workflow. If you want to do a lot
>of cutting portions of one image and putting them in another
>image, Adobe is your choice. If you are using a lot of plug
>ins, ADobe is your choice. And if you are int eh graphics
>field or working primarily for publication, Adobe is your
>choice. Otherwise, you can use a Nikon centric workflow or
>simply choose Adobe out of personal preference.
>
>The core product for an Adobe centric workflow is Lightroom.
>It is an excellent cataloging tool and helps to organize
>images. It has increasingly become a good editor. Lightroom
>essentially replicates camera settings with its own version or
>settings you prefer. Lightroom is an Adobe product, so it
>tends to work well with Photoshop, Elements, and lots of
>plugins.
>
>The core products for a Nikon centric workflow are View NX2
>and Capture NX2. The Nikon products use your actual camera
>settings - and you can change many of those settings in post
>processing. There is no catalog - you use a conventional file
>and folder structure. Through association with Nik, Capture
>offers a lot of control in selective editing - meaning you can
>apply edits just to the skin or just to an eye without
>creating masks. That makes Capture very easy and fast. All
>edit steps to NEF files are automatically non-destructive -
>meaning you can go back and change any step at any time or
>even start fresh with your original. You can also keep
>versions. All this editing is done with only minor increases
>in file size. The NEF file remains with all your edits and
>versions so you are not keeping copies of files.
>
>DXO Optics is unrelated. It is from Phase One. DXO is a good
>RAW editor and has some nice functions for shadow recovery.
>It used to have significant advantages with correction and
>shadow recovery but at this point those advantages are not
>that important for most Nikon photographers using Nikon
>products.
>
>Aperture is the Apple counterpart to Lightroom. It is more of
>a catalog with some editing capability rather than an advanced
>editor.
>
>Your choices are pretty easy. With a Nikon flow you will use
>View for 80-90%+ of your work and Capture for advanced edits.
>You might occasionally still use Photoshop for 1% of your
>images.
>
>You can largely achieve the same results with Lightroom. In
>that case you would use Lightroom for 95%+ of your work and
>you might occasionally use Elements or Photoshop for specific
>needs.
>
>We've done some side by side testing and both workflows
>produce excellent results. Many of us find the user interface
>of View/Capture is preferred. And many others prefer the
>Adobe/Lightroom/Photoshop workflow and working with a company
>that is a software company first and foremost.
>
>At this stage, I would keep it simple. Pick either Lightroom
>or View+Capture. With either approach, plan to invest some
>time learning the product and its capabilities. Take some
>classes after 30-90 days of use. Either choice can probably
>handle 98%+ of your needs.
>
>
>Eric Bowles
>Nikonians Team
>My Gallery
>Workshops
>
>Nikonians membership — my most important photographic
>investment, after the camera


Thanks for the good advice and thorough explanation.

I've read a lot of posts and supporting arguments for both here in the forum. Since I'm on a Mac, I decided on Aperture - to give it a shot and for the price...

I like it so far. Still use View initially to bring raw files into the Mac and then use Aperture for cataloging. You are right about how much to learn. It's been good though. I've been enjoying the journey.

  

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