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Omaha Registered since 07th Jan 2012Sun 16-Mar-14 02:45 PM
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"Coming Full Circle on JPG"


Omaha, US
          

Years ago, when I got my D70, I shot JPG because I didn't know there was any alternative. I bought it to take product shots for our website, and generally things worked out well.

Almost. I was always frustrated that the results weren't exactly what I wanted, so I spent a lot of time fiddling with lighting (mostly). That helped a lot. But then (thanks to some very helpful Nikonians) I finally "got it"...meaning I finally understood how to correlate what I knew about film photography to digital.

So I started shooting everything RAW, and spent countless hours experimenting with different RAW conversion options in Photoshop. That was the last piece of the puzzle, and the results were wonderful. It was a rare image that couldn't be "fixed in post". RAW was where its at.

A couple of years ago, I realized that the amazing medium format film cameras I couldn't begin to afford back in the 80's were available at crazy-low prices today. I ended up getting an amazing Mamiya RB67 setup (complete with some fantastic lenses and a collection of film backs), and the whole business cost less than I spent on my second-hand Nikon 10.5 fisheye.

Back to film I went. I shot about a thousand miles of Tri-X back in the 80's, but this time around I decided to give Ilford FP4 a try. Amazing stuff. I also discovered Kodak Portra 160, which is absolute magic.

I also realized that digital had made me sloppy. I'd moved up to a D7000 by then, and its wonderful, but in its wonderfulness, I had become dependent on "fixing" stuff after the fact. All that is very time consuming and tedious. Film is less forgiving, particularly when you are shooting a completely manual camera (no AF, no AE). Shooting the Mamiya (or my other recent acquisition, a 1955-ish Agfa Isolette III) really makes you think.

All that came together over the last few months and it occurred to me that I should be able to get my D7000 to produce JPGs the way I want them, the first time. Why spend hours in Bridge/Photoshop when I've got this great camera that should be able to produce the JPG I want in the first place?

No reason, actually.

So, for most shots, I'm back to JPG. I also realized that unless I have a reason otherwise, full size images are a waste of space. If you shoot a "small" JPG in "basic" mode, you still end up with a 5.4" x 8.2" image at 300 DPI. So, if you want to print 5x7's, you are good. Even if you want to print 8x10's, you're good. For social media sharing, you actually have way more resolution than you need. AND the files are a delightfully small 600k to 900k or so (most are right around 800k).

The full circle part of this comes in the fact that all my fiddling with RAW conversion had the effect of teaching me how to set the various options on the camera to get the results I want. If I hadn't gone through all that, I would still be overwhelmed by the massive configurability these cameras offer.

I shot a parade yesterday. Ended up with about 600 shots, all "small", "basic" JPGs. Sifting through them, picking out the keepers, uploading to FB, sending off for prints...all that was so much faster and easier than wrestling with 20MB RAW files. And they all look like I want them to look.

I still shoot RAW for serious shots. But for routine stuff, everything about in-camera JPGs is more to my taste.

Just some random Sunday morning musings...

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briantilley Moderator
16th Mar 2014
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briantilley Moderator Deep knowledge of bodies and lens; high level photography skills Nikonian since 26th Jan 2003Sun 16-Mar-14 03:06 PM
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#1. "RE: Coming Full Circle on JPG"
In response to Reply # 0


Paignton, GB
          

>So, for most shots, I'm back to JPG. I also realized that unless I
> have a reason otherwise, full size images are a waste of space. If
>you shoot a "small" JPG in "basic" mode, you still end up with a
>5.4" x 8.2" image at 300 DPI.

Yes, you'll be fine - until you come across that unexpected "shot of a lifetime" that you'd love to process and print LARGE...

Shooting RAW keeps your options open, but there are good reasons for choosing JPEG some of the time

Brian
Welsh Nikonian

  

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ajdooley Silver Member Nikonian since 25th May 2006Sun 16-Mar-14 04:30 PM
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#5. "RE: Coming Full Circle on JPG"
In response to Reply # 1
Sun 16-Mar-14 04:30 PM by ajdooley

Waterloo, US
          

Brian -- I laughingly tell people I haul a pair of D800s and 4 lenses everywhere I go, to prevent tragedies from unfolding in front of me. That's facetious, but I'm with you. I shoot everything in RAW+jpg. I can always discard stuff I don't want -- mistakes, duplicates, photos that don't quite work, etc. But when the next Hindenburg crashes, I'm gonna have it in 14-bit uncompressed NEFs.

Alan
Waterloo, IL, USA
www.proimagingmidamerica.com

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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ScottChapin Moderator Awarded for his high level skills in various areas, including Aviation and Birds Photography Charter MemberSun 16-Mar-14 03:38 PM
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#2. "RE: Coming Full Circle on JPG"
In response to Reply # 0


Powder Springs, US
          

I'm sort of with you here, although I shoot RAW. What I mean by this is that I shoot in RAW, but process outside of a RAW editor. Using Lightroom, I do the most rudimentary adjustments, probably not unlike processing through a Noritsu at Ekerds. Both are now extinct?

Like Brian. I want that RAW file, just in case.

Scott Chapin
Powder Springs, GA, USA
Nikonians Team Member

  

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Chris Platt Silver Member Nikonian since 30th Sep 2012Sun 16-Mar-14 03:40 PM
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#3. "RE: Coming Full Circle on JPG"
In response to Reply # 0


Newburg, US
          

Good points. I will sometimes shoot jpg if I know I am only going to upload to Facebook, but it is rare when I'm willing to take that kind of risk. There have been a few times in the past that I have forgotten to reset my camera to shoot raw and it was a tragedy. DOH!!!

But here's the thought - if you can set your camera to reliably produce the results you want shooting jpgs, it seems to me that you could adjust your presets in raw converters to import with exactly the settings you want - no need to adjust further unless you want to and just as fast. All the raw converters seem to have presets almost identical to Nikon picture controls. You can adjust those and save them.

Memory is so inexpensive and you can shoot raw and jpg at the same time. Why take the "risk" or maybe that's the point? Kind of like climbing without a rope?

Visit my gallery.

  

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Martin Turner Moderator Expert professional PJ & PR photographer Nikonian since 19th Jun 2006Sun 16-Mar-14 04:11 PM
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#4. "RE: Coming Full Circle on JPG"
In response to Reply # 0


Bidford on Avon, GB
          

I always shoot Raw + JPEG small, fine, which means I can upload straight to Facebook, or email straight to a picture desk, but still have the 'negative', as it were, in the RAW file.

I've also learned not to delete mistakes. Sometimes the very blurry mistake shot is exactly what is needed for the cover of a brochure, or as a background, or something like that.

M A R T I N • T U R N E R
http://art.martinturner.org.uk
http://www.martinturner.org.uk

Nikonians membership: my most important photographic investment, after the camera

My Nikonians blog, Learning from the Portrait Masters, http://blog.nikonians.org/martin_turner/

  

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jdbower Gold Member Awarded for his contributions to the Resources Nikonian since 12th Jan 2006Sun 16-Mar-14 07:35 PM
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#6. "RE: Coming Full Circle on JPG"
In response to Reply # 0


New York, US
          

I've actually gone the opposite direction, I used to shoot RAW+JPG but since Google+ has added RAW support I now shoot RAW-only. An Eye-Fi sends it to my phone automatically which compresses it to a 2000px JPG image which gets backed up to Google+ before I get home (usually). Most of the time this JPG is all I use, but if I need to the RAW is there for Gimp to play with.

Jeff Bower
Google+ Profile
Moderator Pages

  

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Indigo586 Registered since 25th Jan 2013Sun 16-Mar-14 09:48 PM
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#7. "RE: Coming Full Circle on JPG"
In response to Reply # 6


US
          

I am new to digital. Well not exactly new and I had a coolpix 5000 since 2004 but I got my first DSLR only this last December. I do shoot RAW&JPEG almost all the times but I see your points. May be I should do the same.

  

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Omaha Registered since 07th Jan 2012Mon 17-Mar-14 02:48 PM
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#17. "RE: Coming Full Circle on JPG"
In response to Reply # 7


Omaha, US
          

>I am new to digital. Well not exactly new and I had a coolpix
>5000 since 2004 but I got my first DSLR only this last
>December. I do shoot RAW&JPEG almost all the times but I
>see your points. May be I should do the same.

The only comment I would offer is that I did find the process of learning how to manually convert RAW files to be very instructive. While I am now of the opinion that our cameras are more than capable of producing marvelous JPGs, I had to walk the "long way around the barn" to get there.

Visit my Nikonians gallery
Most of my Nikon photos end up here.

  

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ZoneV Silver Member Nikonian since 08th Jan 2005Sun 16-Mar-14 11:31 PM
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#8. "RE: Coming Full Circle on JPG"
In response to Reply # 0
Sun 16-Mar-14 11:33 PM by ZoneV

US
          

I agree, even though currently I shoot mostly raw.

My opinion is that current cameras produce a jpeg file with a lot of dynamic range, resolution, and great color...much better than older cameras (which I'm using). You can definitely get away with jpeg in a lot of cases.

What I'm interested in now, since I shoot mostly raw, is learning how to extract the embedded jpeg file from raw files. I have no idea how!

One of my most memorable images was shot in jpeg fine with a D1H back in 2006, and was enlarged to 20x30. A current camera would have made a much better enlargement, but the content of the photo wins over detail.

An undeniable paradox: To think that there is any such thing as an absolute rule is at worst naïve, and at best, shortsighted. There is no such thing as an always-true, all context- or situation-salient, absolute rule that always holds true…including this one!

  

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mklass Platinum Member As a semi-professional involved in all manner of photographic genres including portraiture, sports, commercial, and events coverage, Mick is always ready to help Nikonians by sharing his deep knowledge of photography and printing. Nikonian since 08th Dec 2006Wed 19-Mar-14 08:02 AM
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#28. "RE: Coming Full Circle on JPG"
In response to Reply # 8


Tacoma, US
          

>What I'm interested in now, since I shoot mostly raw, is
>learning how to extract the embedded jpeg file from raw files.
>I have no idea how!

Al,

Here are 2 suggestions for extracting embedded JPGs from a RAW file:

  • Photo Mechanic, although you would need to buy the program and you may not have a use for the rest of it
  • Exif Copier which is a GUI front end for ExifTool (which you would also need to install). Both are free. EXIF Copier shows as a beta, and has for several years, but it works great. It basically runs basically runs as a batch processor on all image in a directory or folder.



Mick
Web Site: http://www.mickklassphoto.com
Online gallery: http://mickklass.gallery
My nikonians gallery

Puget Sound Chapter Coordinator
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Ned_L Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge in various areas, especially Travel Photography Charter MemberMon 17-Mar-14 06:09 AM
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#9. "RE: Coming Full Circle on JPG"
In response to Reply # 0


Philadelphia, US
          

Hi Jeff. What was especially telling for me in your post was this,

"I still shoot RAW for serious shots. But for routine stuff, everything about in-camera JPGs is more to my taste."

Whether I'm shooting for a client, for my stock, or just "fooling around" for my fun, I usually consider all my shots serious, in the sense that I'm always trying to get a wonderful shot I want to put up on the walls of our home, or in my office, etc. to speak to others about subjects and people I find dear, or important, or compelling, or all the above. Even when I'm shooting for a client, I always shoot for me, in the sense that I've got to like the work or no one sees it but me. It doesn't have to be perfect, however, as perfection is what I strive for, but have never achieved.

So I shoot RAW, 100% of the time:


  • because I think I'm smarter than the camera in performing postprocessing, and can far better fine tune what's best for my images than I can set the camera to do.
  • because it's more forgiving if I goof a bit in my exposure.
  • because it has more latitude to bring out the best in the image.
  • because I've gotten to the point that for those exposures I use, if my exposure was well made, I can post process each image in just a few minutes, unless they are "really" special, which will take a bit longer, but the thing about that is that if the exposure is "that special" I'm going to take some quality time in postprocessing, whether it's a RAW or JPG image.
  • but, when shooting for press use, I often shoot in RAW + JPG Fine, Large, as when on an assignment for press use I often must transmit the photos, I think are best, directly to the news organization, immediately after the shoot, or sometimes even during it, according to the event, wirelessly, where the news organization does the postprocessing as necessary.
  • but, when shooting for weddings, I often shoot in RAW + JPG Fine, Large, as it makes it a whole lot faster and easier, for the few weddings I do these days (thank goodness), to get out proofs. I do the same for corporate shoots, to get out the proofs quickly.

Frankly, I advocate photographers save their images in the format which works best for them, using their storage criteria, as long as they know and understand the pluses and minus of each format.

Martin said something which I hope everyone thinks about, as I believe it's an important point. He said, "I've also learned not to delete mistakes. Sometimes the very blurry mistake shot is exactly what is needed for the cover of a brochure, or as a background, or something like that." I'm absolutely ruthless when I review my images and decide which ones to keep, and which ones to delete, but I always have room for interesting mistakes and keep plenty of them for potential use. I'd like to add, that I never delete images directly from my memory cards while shooting. I can't tell what they really look like when viewing them on the camera's monitor. It's far too small. It's also not recommended by the memory card manufacturers as it has the potential to foul up the memory card.

Ned
A Nikonians Team Member

-----------------------------
Visit my Travel Photography Blog and my Galleries.

  

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mklass Platinum Member As a semi-professional involved in all manner of photographic genres including portraiture, sports, commercial, and events coverage, Mick is always ready to help Nikonians by sharing his deep knowledge of photography and printing. Nikonian since 08th Dec 2006Mon 17-Mar-14 08:04 AM
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#10. "RE: Coming Full Circle on JPG"
In response to Reply # 0
Mon 17-Mar-14 01:10 PM by mklass

Tacoma, US
          

With Nikon abandoning CNX2, and CNX-D being aptly named for "Developmental", the best raw converter that will actually use all of your camera settings is, in fact, the camera itself. So outputting to JPG makes some sense, or with those cameras able to do so, TIF.

Mick
Web Site: http://www.mickklassphoto.com
Online gallery: http://mickklass.gallery
My nikonians gallery

Puget Sound Chapter Coordinator
Visit Our Gallery

  

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dagoldst Silver Member Nikonian since 02nd Dec 2012Mon 17-Mar-14 11:13 AM
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#11. "RE: Coming Full Circle on JPG"
In response to Reply # 0


Little Rock, US
          

Spoiler alert - My perspective is a lot different than yours about RAW and Jpeg.
>
>So I started shooting everything RAW, and spent countless
>hours experimenting with different RAW conversion options in
>Photoshop. That was the last piece of the puzzle, and the
>results were wonderful. It was a rare image that couldn't be
>"fixed in post". RAW was where its at.

It still is where it is at for anyone serious about their final printed work. There is just too big a body of evidence by hundreds of thousands of serious photographers to think otherwise.

>Back to film I went. I shot about a thousand miles of Tri-X
>back in the 80's, but this time around I decided to give
>Ilford FP4 a try. Amazing stuff. I also discovered Kodak
>Portra 160, which is absolute magic.

I prefer the Delta series of films, and then TMAX for B&W - but I develop all my B&W myself. I have pretty much tried all the currently available Ilford, Kodak and Fuji films. I also find that developing my own 35mm and 120 film allow lots of flexibility in extracting the data on the film, (everything is data, after all).

On Porta, I pass. Maybe it was my local lab, but I never liked the results of that film. Fuji, in general, is my go to color film, even today, but I just go digital for the most part on color.

>
>I also realized that digital had made me sloppy. I'd moved up
>to a D7000 by then, and its wonderful, but in its
>wonderfulness, I had become dependent on "fixing"
>stuff after the fact.
and then you wrote...
>Film is less forgiving,

Now, here is where I digress with you on your comparison. Film is very forgiving, especially B&W, especially the Delta and TMAX films. Where they are forgiving, is in the highlights. Where they suffer miserably is in the shadows, if underexposed and even a deep shadow on a proper exposure, (Zone 0 & 1), is just full of grainy non-detail.

Digital is exactly the opposite, it is unforgiving in the highlights, but modern sensors, combined with modern software has a terrific ability to recover shadows, especially since the FX series Nikons came out. Those cameras have far more DR below middle gray than above it and I found I can shoot anything under natural lighting with either my former D600 and my now current D610 in one frame, with no blocked shadows and no lost highlights, as long as I obey a certain regimen of exposure, and with my trusty SB600, for my type of flash photography, I can handle most any indoor lighting situation - and I can't say that I ever had that experience with film. I don't do studio work, but I would imagine I could get whatever I wanted with controlled lighting.

>All that came together over the last few months and it
>occurred to me that I should be able to get my D7000 to
>produce JPGs the way I want them, the first time.

The look of a Nikon jpeg is not what I am looking for in an image, either film, or digital. It is a cooked looked that Nikon has gone a long way to achieve, but I don't care for it. So one's mileage may vary on whether it is the "right" look. Plus, you have thrown away vast amounts of data for making adjustments to the photo if it does not make it and you only got one go at it.

I don't typically print smaller than 13x19. So megapixels count. Tonality counts. My Epson uses a 16 bit driver, so my D610's 14 bit RAW Adobe color space images can really take advantage of what both Lightroom, CC and the Epson printer can produce. I have taken plenty of jpegs, and they just don't do as well.

If I were a photojournalist that had to turn over my image immediately for a story, I would live within the jpeg world, (RAW plus jpeg, that is), but otherwise, my vote is for RAW.

David

"Sawed that board three times and it is still too short... "

  

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Omaha Registered since 07th Jan 2012Mon 17-Mar-14 01:47 PM
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#14. "RE: Coming Full Circle on JPG"
In response to Reply # 11


Omaha, US
          

I just think the big print stuff is mostly a myth.

I just took one of my ("small", "basic", 783kb) JPGs from the parade on Saturday and printed it out 18" (on the long side) on my HP Designjet. You know what? It looks great.

Seriously.

I ran it twice. The first time, I let the HP print manager enlarge it (using whatever algorithm those guys use). The second time I enlarged it in Photoshop first and printed it at 100%. They both came out wonderful.

If you're interested, the original, un-manipulated, straight-from-the-camera JPG is here: http://www.themillerpages.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/JMP_4168.jpg

Its a little over-exposed (I can't remember why, but I had set the EC to +.3 at that point). No matter. Even a file like this can be twiddled in PS if you like. Actually, what's really cool is the new CC version of PS allows you to bring up the ACR window (Filter->Camera Raw Filter) on ANY image and use it as a non-destructive adjustment layer. Even if you shoot JPG, you have a lot of editing options if you decide you want them.

The broader point is that if there is anything "good" about that photo (which is rather typical of the sort of stuff I do), its all about the expression on that little girl's face, bored out of her mind as she rides in the parade, and very much not about getting IQ to the nth degree.

I'm not saying RAW is not needed or valuable. I've just concluded that for me, for this kind of shooting, the benefits of a massively simplified and much faster workflow significantly outweigh the benefits of dragging around hundreds or thousands of GB of RAW files I'll never need. It is also significantly faster to tweak your in-camera JPG conversion to get it the way you like, rather than load 600 shots into whatever RAW converter you use and export from there. And uploading to Adorama is monumentally faster. Everything is faster.

There are certainly times when premium IQ is what its all about, and RAW is the way to go there. I do some of that sort of stuff too (mostly portraits). If you're shooting stuff like landscapes or birds in flight (where deep crops are the norm), then you need every pixel you can get. I get that. I'm not trying to persuade anyone to not shoot RAW.

I AM encouraging you to explore your Nikon's in-camera JPG capability. I know I spent too long and too many tens of thousands of shots thinking "in camera JPG is for people who don't know how to process RAW". In coming full circle, I've come to the conclusion that the guys who write the RAW converters built into our cameras actually know a few things about what they are doing, and that letting them do the work is absolutely liberating. YMMV.

Visit my Nikonians gallery
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dagoldst Silver Member Nikonian since 02nd Dec 2012Mon 17-Mar-14 06:51 PM
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#22. "RE: Coming Full Circle on JPG"
In response to Reply # 14


Little Rock, US
          

Jeff,

So, are you saying you cannot see any difference between the image you linked to here and a full size version of that image from your D7000 when printed at 18 inches on the long side?

I know with my D610, vs my D200, vs my D70s, there is a vast difference in fine detail in the images, as well as color accuracy and graduated tonality. That's whether shooting RAW or jpeg.

I have explored Nikon jpegs with my D70s, D200, D600, D610 and even with my wife's D3100. Like I say, it is not a look I care for, I prefer the results I can generate in Lightroom. In fact, from the time I first downloaded LR for evaluation, it took me about a week to decide to dump NX2 - to me, it is that much better.

I understand the desire to simplify workflow - but I find there is very little I do with my images after having developed my LR profiles - a few minutes per image at best, for 90% of the images I take. And in many cases of similar lighting, I can apply the changes of one image to all the others, and that takes seconds of effort on my part.

Like I say, a different perspective,

David

"Sawed that board three times and it is still too short... "

  

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Omaha Registered since 07th Jan 2012Mon 17-Mar-14 08:51 PM
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#26. "RE: Coming Full Circle on JPG"
In response to Reply # 22


Omaha, US
          

>Jeff,
>
>So, are you saying you cannot see any difference between the
>image you linked to here and a full size version of that image
>from your D7000 when printed at 18 inches on the long side?
>

I honestly don't know. What I do know is that the prints I produced this morning...the ones that by the standard of mega pixel counters should have been hopelessly inadequate...look just fine. I showed them around the office and everyone agreed. And remember, these are people who work in printing/graphics every day. (No, I didn't tell them what I was testing first ).

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Omaha Registered since 07th Jan 2012Mon 17-Mar-14 02:04 PM
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#15. "RE: Coming Full Circle on JPG"
In response to Reply # 11


Omaha, US
          

>Now, here is where I digress with you on your comparison.
>Film is very forgiving, especially B&W

What I mean is this: With digital, if you get the lighting a bit wrong, it is a trivial matter to go back and do some selective exposure compensation/dodging/burning/masking/etc to make adjustments. With film (and I too print analog on my B&W stuff) those sorts of adjustments are way, way more difficult (cutting out little dodging tools, lots of experimenting with various contrast filter grades for different segments of the negative, etc). It is that sense that I describe film as less forgiving.

I agree completely that with film, you're better off erring on the side of overexposure, while digital punishes overexposure and rewards underexposure.

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spiritualized67 Silver Member Nikonian since 01st Mar 2007Mon 17-Mar-14 12:11 PM
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#12. "RE: Coming Full Circle on JPG"
In response to Reply # 0


Western PA, US
          

Your logic makes a ton of sense - except for that one time when you're photographing an event that you may feel is casual and/or commonplace, and manage to capture that once in a lifetime shot.

You just never know when life will throw some magic your way. Sometimes you don't know when the "serious shot" will manifest itself. Maybe it's a merging of circumstances or a spontaneous gesture; maybe it's just being in the right place at the right time.

At that point, you'd probably wish you had an image slightly better than JPG basic. Of course, I'm speculating - and for the majority of your needs, you'll be spot on using a basic setting.

I suppose it ultimately depends on your shooting goals for any given event (e.g. shooting a static subject like a product vs. a dynamic event like a parade) - but even the most pedestrian of circumstances can present themselves in unique and random ways.

I'll agree that more realistic in-camera settings (e.g. smaller file size) can save work down the line - I'd rather err on the side of serendipity.

~Dan
www.danielstainer.com

  

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Ned_L Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge in various areas, especially Travel Photography Charter MemberMon 17-Mar-14 12:46 PM
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#13. "RE: Coming Full Circle on JPG"
In response to Reply # 12


Philadelphia, US
          

Well put Dan. Thanks.

Ned
A Nikonians Team Member

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professorune Registered since 08th Jun 2013Mon 17-Mar-14 02:06 PM
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#16. "RE: Coming Full Circle on JPG"
In response to Reply # 0


HK
          

JPEGs suit me better in terms of the time consuming post processing involved and storage capacity required.

However I'm now considering the other 'direction' & wanting to try RAW since it gives greater options as noted by other members.

  

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Ned_L Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge in various areas, especially Travel Photography Charter MemberMon 17-Mar-14 03:08 PM
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#18. "RE: Coming Full Circle on JPG"
In response to Reply # 16


Philadelphia, US
          

RAW requires postprocessing for every image, however, when photographers learn PS or LR, and I mean really learn it and understand it, for most images, you don't spend much time per image, and in my opinion, you can usually do a superior job than that done by the camera.

I am of the opinion, based on my experience, and the photographers I know well, that many overestimate the time required to postprocess most typical well exposed images.

Ned
A Nikonians Team Member

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ScottChapin Moderator Awarded for his high level skills in various areas, including Aviation and Birds Photography Charter MemberMon 17-Mar-14 03:59 PM
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#19. "RE: Coming Full Circle on JPG"
In response to Reply # 18


Powder Springs, US
          

Agreed Ned. The only issue I have with RAW, particularly with D800 files, is the import times and export times. Processing differences are fairly transparent to me.

I guess I need to get a Thunderbolt adapter for my MAC. That should help improve the import times.

Scott Chapin
Powder Springs, GA, USA
Nikonians Team Member

  

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Ned_L Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge in various areas, especially Travel Photography Charter MemberMon 17-Mar-14 04:16 PM
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#20. "RE: Coming Full Circle on JPG"
In response to Reply # 19


Philadelphia, US
          

From my memory card reader I'm connected via USB 3.0 so it's pretty darn fast.

Ned
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ScottChapin Moderator Awarded for his high level skills in various areas, including Aviation and Birds Photography Charter MemberMon 17-Mar-14 05:43 PM
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#21. "RE: Coming Full Circle on JPG"
In response to Reply # 20
Mon 17-Mar-14 06:50 PM by ScottChapin

Powder Springs, US
          

My Macbook is still USB 2.0, so the Thunderbolt adapter sounds like my best option now. I think its under 150USD.

Scott Chapin
Powder Springs, GA, USA
Nikonians Team Member

  

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Ned_L Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge in various areas, especially Travel Photography Charter MemberMon 17-Mar-14 07:39 PM
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#24. "RE: Coming Full Circle on JPG"
In response to Reply # 21


Philadelphia, US
          

I think you're right. Fortunately, my Dell Xenon based workstation has 6 USB 3.0 ports, and my Dell i7 based P3800 laptop has 3 USB 3.0 ports. I am amazed at how much faster they are compared to the USB 2.0 ports.

My younger son loves his Thunderbolt on his Mac.

Ned
A Nikonians Team Member

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jbloom Gold Member Awarded for the continuous and generous sharing of his high level expertise and his always encouraging comments in several forums. Nikonian since 15th Jul 2004Mon 17-Mar-14 07:06 PM
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#23. "RE: Coming Full Circle on JPG"
In response to Reply # 0


Wethersfield, US
          

An interesting discussion. I haven't seen anyone mention that shooting JPEG can let your camera behave in advantageous ways. A well-known example is the D7100's small buffer. It's only small if you shoot RAW. If you shoot JPEG, especially at less than full resolution, you can get long bursts that are impossible in RAW. Now, I know someone is likely to immediate post a response disparaging long bursts. But there are people who use them profitably, and if they can do so while getting good image quality because, like Jeff, they know how to set up their camera optimally, who is to say the (possibly small) IQ advantage of the larger RAW file outweighs the advantage of faster, more capable shooting?

-- Jon
Wethersfield, CT, USA
Connecticut High School Sports Photos

  

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prreid Silver Member Nikonian since 10th Oct 2012Mon 17-Mar-14 07:50 PM
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#25. "RE: Coming Full Circle on JPG"
In response to Reply # 23


Naples, US
          

I agree with those who shoot both JPEG and RAW: (e.g. at a family reunion it's JPEG and on a photo shoot it's RAW). The initial "squashing" by JPEG and more file degradation with each save can be partially attenuated by saving the JPEG as a TIFF (or PSD) file. AND one can post-process a JPEG in ACR (although there are limitations vs. RAW).

prreid

  

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Antero52 Silver Member Awarded for his expertise in post-processing, being  consistently helpful and professional. Nikonian since 07th Jul 2009Tue 18-Mar-14 11:00 AM
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#27. "RE: Coming Full Circle on JPG"
In response to Reply # 0


Vantaa, FI
          

I had a related experience when I filmed my son's wedding with one camcorder and two Nikons (D800E, V2). I am so used to shooting raw and fixing stuff like WB and contrast after the shoot that I didn't address these issues when shooting video. Result: I had to run most of my Nikon-created movie clips through Photoshop to correct color, tonality and whatnot. I should have set the WB and selected a conservative calibration setting (eg Neutral or Portrait) before the shoot. I'm glad that CS6 was able to fix most of the issues but it takes time. A 5-min clip takes 5 minutes to adjust and 20 minutes to process.

Regards, Antero

  

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cocavaak Silver Member Nikonian since 13th Dec 2006Wed 19-Mar-14 08:29 PM
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#29. "Another option"
In response to Reply # 0


Boulder, US
          

If you're worried about disk space you can do what I'm thinking of doing:
Shoot Raw + jpeg. Then in Aperture I can just download the jpegs, and look at those. If there are any I want as Raw I can then download just those raw files.

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jdroach Platinum Member Fellow Ribbon awarded. John exhibits true Nikonian spirit by frequently posting images and requesting comments and critique, which he graciously accepts. He is an inspiration to all of us through constant improvement in his own work, keen observations and excellent commentary on images posted by others. Nikonian since 21st Mar 2009Thu 20-Mar-14 08:30 PM
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#30. "RE: Coming Full Circle on JPG"
In response to Reply # 0
Thu 20-Mar-14 08:32 PM by jdroach

Milwaukee, US
          

Interesting discussion. I shoot jpeg for awhile when I was learning my DSLRs and then I turned to RAW exclusively. Last Fall I took a class in seeing in Black & White where the instructor wanted us to shoot black & white without processing initially to start sensing tonal variations and opportunities. Thus, I began to shoot jpeg and RAW with the picture control set for Monochrome. Now, I find myself more and more doing that even when I do not want black and white. Sometimes, I am totally delighted with the jpeg that comes out of the camera. I still don't want to give up the post work possibilities which might be denied me if I shot exclusively in jpeg, but it does offer some new ways of seeing and forces you to make the exposure the best possible without relaying on Post work all the time.

jdroach, a Milwaukee area and sometimes Chicago area Nikonian.





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