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Forums Lobby MULTILINGUAL NIKONIANS English Café (Public) topic #897
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Subject: "Popular Photography, February 2001, issue" Previous topic | Next topic
f5fstop Awarded for his contributions to the Resources Basic MemberSat 20-Jan-01 04:53 PM
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"Popular Photography, February 2001, issue"


Private, UM
          

Anyone read this issue yet? Some very interesting articles this month.

In one article, Herb Keppler talks about how Nikon pretty much coined the phrase “matrix,” and how some of the acronyms used in the past and the present catch on in photo language, and some do not.

Another article is about the world’s most expensive camera. A Nikon SP Rangefinder 35, recently sold to an anonymous European, in an auction run by Tamarkin Photographica in Woodbridge CT (USA), for $25,000.00 (USD). The 50mm F/1.1 Nikkor Lens sold separately sold for over $12,000.00 (USD).
The article goes on to state that the camera was one of the rare factory black versions manufactured between 1957-60, and had a multiple, parallax-compensating field framelines, built in wide-angle viewfinder, and unique styling.
Like they said in the article, that is a lot of “…mazuma¾even for the rare factory black version…”

Doug


--Take only photographs, leave nothing but footprints--



"Take only photographs, leave only footprints"


  

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frankie Basic MemberSat 20-Jan-01 06:42 PM
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#1. "RE: Popular Photography, February 2001, issue"
In response to Reply # 0



          

Oh it really doesn't surprise me... In the music biz it happens all the time. In the 50's a guitar called the "Flying V" was made for the youth of that era - it's the one that looks like a V shape... Really bloody ugly.

Nobody liked them and they ended up being a very very limited production run. They were made of Carina wood - a specially resonant wood - although those guitars weren't really tone guitars, more like noise guitars electronics-wise.

Anyway, there are about 125 of the original ones left in the world. Do you want to buy one? Be prepared to shell out $120,000 for a guitar that Gibson couldn't GIVE AWAY in the 50's.

There are lots of people who'll gladly step up to the plate to purchase these jokes of the industry. Most of the time they're not even really interested in the applied field, and are more interested in it as an investment.

It's also timing... It's well known when an object attains high-value and that is when it's usually put into circulation by speculators and rumour builders.

That's why old F's don't command that sort of money, nor do most other old goods (like my vintage 1920's "whisker-crystal" AM radio - worth on the used market about 10$ if I can find someone really stupid enough to buy it.

Case in point: I wanted an old Bell metal 301 desk-set - like modern dial phones except they were cast iron, had a seperate ringer box and a great handset with a cupped mouthpiece. My dad told me you could buy them in the late 50's from Bell after they left rental-circulation for about $20 Canadian a set. I found one a couple years ago and the guy wanted $300 for it WITHOUT the bell-box...

So I got a cellphone instead...

Cheeri'o...
Frankie...

  

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jrp Administrator JRP is one of the co-founders, has in-depth knowledge in various areas. Awarded for his contributions for the Resources Charter MemberSat 24-Feb-01 04:00 AM
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#2. "RE: Popular Photography, February 2001, issue"
In response to Reply # 0


San Pedro Garza García, MX
          

Very interesting article. From Keppler's point of view Nikon cameras were sold because their marketing people learn to use buzzwords, like matrix ......... interesting ....... Nevertheless, like you, I liked the article.
BTW, what that the buzzword that sold the Nikon SP for plenty of "mazuma"?
Have a great time
JRP (Nikonian at the north-eastern Mexican desert)
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