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Subject: "Photography room recommendations. " Previous topic | Next topic
TashSt Silver Member Fellow Ribbon awarded for her great compositional insight and talent, as she is always willing to experiment with new perspectives. This is particularly evident in the exceptional, captivating images she posts in the Nude Forum where she always shares in the Nikonians spirit.
Nikonian since 23rd Jul 2011Sat 01-Jun-13 12:41 AM
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"Photography room recommendations. "


AU
          

Hello Nikonians...

I am in the very fortunate (haha) process of building a house. I have managed to secure a space in this house for a 3.39m x 3.53m 'studio'

The room is on the Western side of the house so will get afternoon sunlight. Local council restrictions mean I cannot have full height opening windows along that wall, so I have 'highlight' windows reaching across the span of the wall and have been allowed one non opening, obscured glass normal height window. Considering that the fence is only a meter from this wall the obscured glass window would only be for 'light'

If that all makes sense to you - would you put in the obscured glass window or consider a sky light?

I plan on hanging rails for several different backdrops around the room later etc Are there any other suggestions that I can include at this early stage of building that will help? ceiling lighting, power point advice etc? How would you set up this space?

Thanks in advance.

www.impressstphotography.com

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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Ferguson Silver Member
01st Jun 2013
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TashSt Silver Member
01st Jun 2013
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Ned_L Moderator
02nd Jun 2013
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kennoll Gold Member
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jrp Administrator
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Ferguson Silver Member Nikonian since 19th Aug 2004Sat 01-Jun-13 02:53 AM
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#1. "RE: Photography room recommendations. "
In response to Reply # 0
Sat 01-Jun-13 11:38 AM by Ferguson

Cape Coral, US
          

What's the purpose - to display your photographs, or work on them, or as a studio in which to photograph?


Linwood

Comments welcomed on pictures: Http://captivephotons.com

  

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TashSt Silver Member Fellow Ribbon awarded for her great compositional insight and talent, as she is always willing to experiment with new perspectives. This is particularly evident in the exceptional, captivating images she posts in the Nude Forum where she always shares in the Nikonians spirit.
Nikonian since 23rd Jul 2011Sat 01-Jun-13 03:01 PM
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#2. "RE: Photography room recommendations. "
In response to Reply # 1


AU
          


A studio to photograph in. I'd set up a permanent macro station.. and then was thinking of having a corner/wall for portraits etc..



www.impressstphotography.com

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Ned_L Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge in various areas, especially Travel Photography Charter MemberSun 02-Jun-13 02:16 AM
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#7. "RE: Photography room recommendations. "
In response to Reply # 2


Philadelphia, US
          

Hi Tash,

The space you're talking about isn't very big. For those of us in the US, the room is 3.39m x 3.53m or 11 feet x 11.5 feet.

So the first thing I'd suggest is forget the permanent macro station if you intend to do portraits of more than a single person or couple. Think more about a macro station you can set up quickly and take down easily. (I have a great collapsible light tent I put on a large folding table, and other macro stuff too.) You'll need the space for background, lights (softboxes/umbrellas/hair light on boom/etc.), reflectors, seats/stools/bench/etc. (at times), your camera, computer to review shots on large screen immediately after each shot, etc., etc, etc, and don't forget storage. Moreover, I don't know about you, but generally, I try to be at least 8 feet (2.4m) away from my subjects in the studio, and they need to be at least a few feet (1 meter) away from the background. So we are already using the entire room.

Forget the corner for portraits. You need a wall. The corner is inefficient for having a backdrop, for example, plus it's even worse if photographing more than one person in the shot.

Natural lighting can be great, but I've found, at least for me, more often than not, artificial light is far better as I have total control of it. For corporate type shots, families, etc., I generally always use strobe lighting. Everything's controlled via Pocket Wizards. I occasionally use natural light for poses in which emotion, and/or romance is important, but I can do that really well with studio lighting too. If it's to be natural light, I like real windows myself. In addition, you'll need a complete black blackout curtain to eliminate all light from the window when you need a black room for artificial light solely. Plus, I'd have a gauze like current for light diffusion too, and as a mood creator.

No windows are good unless you have a way to totally block their light.

Power is important. You can have too much. Spread the outlets around the room so you don't have power cables criss-crossing the room. Have the room on at least 2 circuit breakers. I regularly use a couple of lights in umbrellas/softboxes, perhaps a beauty light, a hairlight on a boom, a light to illuminate the background, and perhaps a light from underneath if I have a chin problem (often use a reflector for that.) Then I have a laptop which has each image going to it immediately to be able to review each shot by connecting my camera to the laptop to store and show the images. (You can't end a portrait shoot unless you are certain you have the shots you need.) That's quite a bit to power up.

The color of the room is important. In my opinion, black is best, something around 18% gray is second best and white is third best. All should be matte finishes on the walls and ceiling and as dull as you can do for the floor. If you have to do so, you might need to use a black tarp on the floor. You want no color in the room as you don't want room color in your images.

Great heating and cooling (mentioned by JRP) is critical as you want your models/subjects to be comfortable at all times. JRP's pipe suggestion to hang backdrops is an excellent alternative to having a hanging system which you can put up or down, but make sure you have a way to get up to the pipe to hang your backdrops.

Get some of your best work framed and have it at your rest/discussion area.

I think that's about it for starters.

Ned
A Nikonians Team Member

-----------------------------
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kennoll Gold Member Nikonian since 07th Feb 2011Sat 01-Jun-13 07:25 PM
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#3. "RE: Photography room recommendations. "
In response to Reply # 0


Seattle, US
          

Couple of things, not necessarily related to specific photography subject matter: You might want to think about electrical power to the space and how you will use it. It may require more/less amperage than normal for a room this size. Perhaps have a separate breaker for the room. How many amps will the studio lights and other devices requiring power take (PC's, laptops, printers, etc)? I would even consider power receptacles in the floor at various points so as not have studio light power lines snaking all over the floor.

Looking toward the future when/if you would want to sell the home you may need a closet in the room to qualify as an additional bedroom. That's a requirement here in the states. The "closet" could become a storage room for your photo equipment then revert back to closet later if need be.

The skylight is a good idea especially if you can get one with an internal blind so you can control the light without climbing a ladder. The window should be a normal window with perhaps an internal blind as well.

Adjustable halogen "can" lighting for the ceiling with dimmer switches. Perhaps two sets so you can adjust for contrast?

Anyway, a few thoughts. We went through a major remodel of our home and, as most remodellers will attest, there's those "shoulda" things. Like I "shoulda" put an electrical receptacle here or I "shoulda" run the in-ceiling speaker wires, or a window "shoulda" went there. Perhaps if you role played as a photographer and went through the motions you will find other considerations for the room as well and avoid some of those "shouldas".

Congratulations on your new home and good luck in setting up your studio.

Ken
Seattle, WA
My Gallery

  

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jrp Administrator JRP is one of the co-founders, has in-depth knowledge in various areas. Awarded for his contributions for the Resources Charter MemberSat 01-Jun-13 08:22 PM
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#4. "RE: Photography room recommendations. "
In response to Reply # 0
Sun 02-Jun-13 05:40 AM by jrp

San Pedro Garza García, MX
          

I. If you are going to spend there a considerable amount of time, when it comes to windows it may be good to think in therms of:


  • Natural light availability (windows and skylight)

  • Efficient blinds (for total darkness when needed)

  • Ventilation (opening windows in the direction of the dominant winds)

  • Heating

  • Cooling

Instead of 'obscured' windows you may want to consider blind-able glass or acrylic blocks:




II. For the macro station, consider a large kitchen tall working station with rollers

  • You don't have to bend and can work standing around the table, or

  • Work from a tall bar-type comfortable stool

  • You can roll it out of the way into a corner for people photography


III. In full agreement with Ken on electrical outlets

  • Have electricians place at least a double one on each of the four walls.

  • If possible, that room should have its own independent circuit breaker and ground cables.

I seldom use my lights (mostly working with speedlights), but when I do, I miss those outlets at the right places and have to use long extensions with which I trip all the time.


IV. People photography.

A corner will not do. You'll need the full extension of a wall given the inside dimensions of the room.

  • Have a pipe/bar permanently embedded in the walls, up close to the ceiling and that wall, to hang backgrounds and even hair light(s) with clamps

  • You can have it painted the same color of the room walls and ceiling to make it "invisible" when not in use

  • Place the windows as close as needed to that wall for photographs with window natural light; mornings and/or afternoons

  • Have in there two very comfortable chairs, for the model/subject and yourself. They are always needed for rest or work on your camera settings. These chairs are apart from a possible modeling stool for images made of the model seating.


V. Studio Decoration.

  • Hang in the walls the best images that make you proud of your accomplishments and those that make you happy.

  • The room should be inviting to you and your model(s)

  • These should also will give confidence of your skills to your people photography subjects.


VI. Post-processing

I would try to avoid having there the post-processing/printing station.
It would eat at least 1.50m of depth leaving you down to only 2m distance from the opposite wall, surely not enough for full standing body shots with a non-distorting lens (85 to 105mm of focal length)

Good luck!

Have a great time
JRP (Founder & Administrator. Nikonian at the north-eastern Mexican desert) Gallery, Brief Love Story, The Team
Join the Silver, Gold and Platinum members that help this happen; upgrade. Join your personal web site to the Nikonians WebRing
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HBB Moderator Hal is an expert in several areas, including CLS Awarded for his excellent article contributions to the Resources. Charter MemberSat 01-Jun-13 08:33 PM
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#5. "RE: Photography room recommendations. "
In response to Reply # 0
Sun 02-Jun-13 06:47 PM by HBB

Phoenix, US
          

Tash:

In no particular order of significance:


1) The color temperature of daylight, through a window or skylight will, vary enormously throughout the day and the year, ranging from 2,700 K or so in the evening to 8,000 K or higher during a rainy, overcast day. This will present white balance issues when mixing it with overhead tungsten cans, speedlights, etc.

You may want to include a means of covering all window and/or skylight areas so you can achieve a more or less constant white balance color temperature with tungsten, studio strobes, speedlights, etc.

2) If possible, consider a 3.0 + meter ceiling, to allow for greater backdrop height and compositional freedom. The backdrop material may work as a cover for the west wall window areas. I use Denny Mfg Company's "Photo Black" backdrops, which soak up light like a sponge.

3) Will this room be used for studio only, or will it include an area for a desk for post processing, printing, etc?

4) What will your subjects be: still life, portraits, etc?

5) Remember that wall, floor, and ceiling colors will affect the color temperature of reflected ambient and/or supplemental (speedlights, etc.) illumination. I would stick with white, or a truly neutral gray for these surfaces. I have seen studios painted in black, but personally don't care for that treatment.


Sounds like fun!

Regards,

HBB in Phoenix, Arizona
Nikonian Team Member

Photography is a journey with no conceivable destination.

  

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Scotty Silver Member Nikonian since 07th Feb 2002Sun 02-Jun-13 01:21 AM
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#6. "RE: Photography room recommendations. "
In response to Reply # 0


Ely, Cambridgeshire, GB
          

Seeing as you are building from scratch and your room will be full of photographic and computer equipment I would be thinking of additional security measures - locks, alarms etc. The normal house ones may not be adequate when it comes to gear. Worth a thought...

D2Xs + AF20-35mm f2.8 + AF35-70mm f2.8 + AF80-200mm f2.8

or

FE + Nikkor 50mm f1.8 AIS

Hunger pays a heavy price to the shining Gods of speed and steel

Check out my website...
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LIKE me on Facebook
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Alex

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kennoll Gold Member Nikonian since 07th Feb 2011Sun 02-Jun-13 02:30 AM
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#8. "RE: Photography room recommendations. "
In response to Reply # 0


Seattle, US
          

Here's a link to a link showing all kinds of studios, uses, etc. May be useful for you.

http://www.google.com/search?q=photographic+studios&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=E66qUZSnL6nViwKJtoCoDQ&ved=0CEQQsAQ&biw=1745&bih=977

Ken
Seattle, WA
My Gallery

  

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pqtrths Silver Member Nikonian since 02nd May 2007Sun 02-Jun-13 06:40 PM
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#9. "RE: Photography room recommendations. "
In response to Reply # 8


Dublin, CA, US
          

The power comments are important. New construction can specify a separate 20 amp line and outlet with a dedicated breaker to each wall of the room. I would also suggest surge protectors and power filtration to maintain the power reaching your equipment at the correct voltage and frequency.

Mp

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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Ned_L Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge in various areas, especially Travel Photography Charter MemberSun 02-Jun-13 09:16 PM
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#12. "RE: Photography room recommendations. "
In response to Reply # 9


Philadelphia, US
          

I connect everything with surge protectors myself, but plug-in ones, not built in ones which are expensive. The plug-in ones are more than adequate. I haven't found the need for power conditioning to date. If you need that, I'd purchase it as a plug-in too.

Ned
A Nikonians Team Member

-----------------------------
Visit my Travel Photography Blog and my Galleries.

  

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Ferguson Silver Member Nikonian since 19th Aug 2004Sun 02-Jun-13 06:45 PM
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#10. "RE: Photography room recommendations. "
In response to Reply # 0


Cape Coral, US
          


I don't do studio work so take this with a grain of salt, but I spent my life in front of a terminal. I find outside light to be more harm that good in front of a monitor. I'd think the same may be true for a studio, where it's about control over light.

When I built my very first home office I let people suggest "skylight, big windows" and had wonderful outside light. My mother (pre-computers) would have loved it. I turned on my computer and could not even see that it was on, and later put blinds and shades on all the windows and the huge skylight, and they almost never got opened. Despite being accused of working in a cave it works much better to control your lighting when trying to do photo editing, not have it controlled for you.

I wish in that case I had put in far fewer windows (giving me lots more wallspace for other purposes like bookshelves) and no skylight.

I would think a studio might be similar. Maybe a water-colorist or oil painter wants that wonderful natural light. Do you?


Linwood

Comments welcomed on pictures: Http://captivephotons.com

  

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Martin Turner Moderator Expert professional PJ & PR photographer Nikonian since 19th Jun 2006Sun 02-Jun-13 08:15 PM
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#11. "RE: Photography room recommendations. "
In response to Reply # 0


Bidford on Avon, GB
          

3.53m is very short if you want to shoot full length.

Normally, you would want to get the background as far away from the subject as the camera is from the subject. This enables you to use a small aperture without introducing the texture of the background into the shot, and also means you can light it how you like without having shadows falling onto the background, which you usually don't want.

A solution to this is to shoot using an illuminated background like a Hi-lite or a Green-Screen hi-kite. You can then push the subject right up to the background and still not see the background in the shot.

Alternatively, you could think about using seamless paper, for which you need some kind of hanging system which puts the paper as close to the back wall as possible. Seamless paper doesn't solve the problem of shadows from the subjects falling onto the background, but it does give more options in terms of colour.

I would think about a ceiling mounted lighting system, but I wouldn't necessarily think too long and too hard about it. None of the ceiling systems I've seen are as flexible as lights on rollers, or even lights on stands.

Hope this helps a little.

M A R T I N • T U R N E R
http://art.martinturner.org.uk
http://www.martinturner.org.uk

Nikonians membership: my most important photographic investment, after the camera

My Nikonians blog, Learning from the Portrait Masters, http://blog.nikonians.org/martin_turner/

  

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km6xz Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge in various areas, including Portraits and Urban Photography Nikonian since 22nd Jan 2009Mon 03-Jun-13 09:15 PM
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#13. "RE: Photography room recommendations. "
In response to Reply # 0


St Petersburg, RU
          

I had a larger space to build a studio but still had to design space saving equipment to make the space useful for portrait and fashion.
I think you will be very cramped for space. In my case, I figured that getting everything off the floor would help with reducing clutter in the 12sq meter space.
I solved that by putting a wood grid on the 4 meter high ceiling and installed standard cast floor flanges from the hardware store, and cut a number of threaded PVC pipes sections that could screw into the floor flanges in the ceiling. That was so light stands were needed nor were supports for reflectors, gobos and camera mount( the PVC was not rigid enough for camera stands so those got changed to iron pipe which was pretty heavy). Power came from the ceiling also so no cables were on the floor, the floor was clear of all obstructions. It took only a few minutes to screw in the PVC pipes in the positions I needed, otherwise all the fittings were stored in a closet. I had 2 windows but most shooting was at night so they were not factors. I lost access to that space when I split up with the GF who owned the apartment.

If I build up another studio it will be larger, located in a rented office space I have that has beautiful top floor, floor-to-ceiling glass that angles up at the roof line to have half the ceiling wall to wall glass also.
It is 37 sq meters, with a spectacular view to the south of historic cathedrals and palaces. The ceiling is 4 meters high. I have had it for 2 years, and use it in the summers for overflow work from two larger offices on the same 6th top floor that are not so blessed with natural light. During the winter the studio room is empty. I can't add any structural changes, it was intended to be a VIP conference room and no holes can be drilled in the wood paneling or ceiling. Everything will have to be on floor mounted stands. I shot 132 guide id badge photos this spring with just the natural light and 1 SB900 with umbrella and the light was great. Each girl wanted additional photos and poses so that turned out to be over a thousand shots and the light was perfect each time. In September I will move my home made strobes and softboxes there for the winter.
Although there are no shades or curtains, it will be a good place to demonstrate a new product an architect and I developed, adaptive windows overlays that can instantly go from clear to 4.5 stops of light attenuation with continuous variability and 8ms response time. We are getting ready to get production ready for the first large office building that has committed to use it.
Stan
St Petersburg Russia

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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TashSt Silver Member Fellow Ribbon awarded for her great compositional insight and talent, as she is always willing to experiment with new perspectives. This is particularly evident in the exceptional, captivating images she posts in the Nude Forum where she always shares in the Nikonians spirit.
Nikonian since 23rd Jul 2011Tue 04-Jun-13 05:50 AM
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#14. "RE: Photography room recommendations. "
In response to Reply # 0


AU
          


Thanks for the great replies. The room now has four double power outlets on each wall in the corner. I don't know much about phases and things, new homes here must be fitted with electrical safety switches, and surge protected outlets. I'll have to run with that for now...

... especially considering I now have to name it the photography room and not studio... lol I can't do much about the space.. actually I can.. I can have a slightly longer room but I will lose the higher ceilings. The placement of the current room was because it was in the raised ceiling part of the house.

I have to compromise... what would you have? higher ceilings or longer floors?

www.impressstphotography.com

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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Ned_L Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge in various areas, especially Travel Photography Charter MemberTue 04-Jun-13 10:13 AM
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#15. "RE: Photography room recommendations. "
In response to Reply # 14


Philadelphia, US
          

>Thanks for the great replies. The room now has four double
>power outlets on each wall in the corner. I don't know much
>about phases and things, new homes here must be fitted with
>electrical safety switches, and surge protected outlets. I'll
>have to run with that for now...

Are you sure it's surge protected outlets, and not GFI or Ground Fault Protected outlets? The two are very different. GFI is good, but it's not surge protection. I would still suggest you plug in much of your equipment through surge protection.

>... especially considering I now have to name it the
>photography room and not studio... lol I can't do much
>about the space.. actually I can.. I can have a slightly
>longer room but I will lose the higher ceilings. The placement
>of the current room was because it was in the raised ceiling
>part of the house.
>
> I have to compromise... what would you have? higher ceilings
>or longer floors?

As long as the ceiling doesn't get too low, I'd go for the larger room. I think you'll find the space is more useful than the height.

Ned
A Nikonians Team Member

-----------------------------
Visit my Travel Photography Blog and my Galleries.

  

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TashSt Silver Member Fellow Ribbon awarded for her great compositional insight and talent, as she is always willing to experiment with new perspectives. This is particularly evident in the exceptional, captivating images she posts in the Nude Forum where she always shares in the Nikonians spirit.
Nikonian since 23rd Jul 2011Tue 04-Jun-13 10:42 PM
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#17. "RE: Photography room recommendations. "
In response to Reply # 15


AU
          


>
>Are you sure it's surge protected outlets, and not GFI or
>Ground Fault Protected outlets? The two are very different.
>GFI is good, but it's not surge protection. I would still
>suggest you plug in much of your equipment through surge
>protection.
>

>Ned
>A Nikonians Team
>Member

>
>-----------------------------
>Visit my
>Travel Photography Blog and
>my Galleries.



good point.. I'll double check with the builder.

www.impressstphotography.com

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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jrp Administrator JRP is one of the co-founders, has in-depth knowledge in various areas. Awarded for his contributions for the Resources Charter MemberWed 05-Jun-13 04:39 AM
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#18. "RE: Photography room recommendations. "
In response to Reply # 14
Wed 05-Jun-13 04:41 AM by jrp

San Pedro Garza García, MX
          

Glad to see you come back to your own post Tash.
I was concerned we scared you away

I would go for a longer room since you said there is nothing much you can do about its height.

Have a great time
JRP (Founder & Administrator. Nikonian at the north-eastern Mexican desert) Gallery, Brief Love Story, The Team
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TashSt Silver Member Fellow Ribbon awarded for her great compositional insight and talent, as she is always willing to experiment with new perspectives. This is particularly evident in the exceptional, captivating images she posts in the Nude Forum where she always shares in the Nikonians spirit.
Nikonian since 23rd Jul 2011Wed 05-Jun-13 05:52 AM
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#19. "RE: Photography room recommendations. "
In response to Reply # 18


AU
          

looks like I was vetoed out of the other room, In the diplomatic process that is house building..


I suppose I could just buy a really wide angle lens



Might just stick with exploring more of the macro stuff

There are still some shots I can do with models in that room.. just nothing too fancy I suppose.

I appreciate the feedback. It;s given me some things to consider that I hadn't thought of The electrical and natural lighting stuff was valuable information... and the suggestion about security was great. I can actually solve both problems by using a window product here that covers the windows from the outside with a solid screen. It's security safe and it blocks out most of the light and it's controlled from inside the room.

we can only do the best we can with what we've got.

www.impressstphotography.com

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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jrp Administrator JRP is one of the co-founders, has in-depth knowledge in various areas. Awarded for his contributions for the Resources Charter MemberWed 05-Jun-13 07:58 AM
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#20. "RE: Photography room recommendations. "
In response to Reply # 19
Wed 05-Jun-13 08:22 AM by jrp

San Pedro Garza García, MX
          

"We do what we can with what we have and where we are"
Martha Washington.
Addressing wives of soldiers at the Continental Army Valley Forge Winter Camp. Winter of 1777-78.

When we built our home -some 34 years ago- the moment came when a few dreams had to be "deferred forever", however determined to be very happy there. We were, and we are.

Good luck, Tash.

Have a great time
JRP (Founder & Administrator. Nikonian at the north-eastern Mexican desert) Gallery, Brief Love Story, The Team
Join the Silver, Gold and Platinum members that help this happen; upgrade. Join your personal web site to the Nikonians WebRing
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EpicDan Silver Member Charter MemberTue 04-Jun-13 12:23 PM
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#16. "RE: Photography room recommendations. "
In response to Reply # 0


St. Paul, US
          

Your room lights should be on a seprate breaker. When something blows the outlet's breaker you wont be left in the dark.

Minnesota electrical regulations require an outlet every 4 feet (1.3m) and one not more than 2 feet (.6m) from any corner. It seems like a lot until I start using the space. Quad outlet boxes cost almost exactly the same as doubles. Quad is a lot nicer.

Lutron makes Maestro light switches that are radio remote controled. That may be helpful.

You may want a few outlets on switches so you can place lights in the room where you want them and control from a central location.

Daniel McGowan
Visit my Nikonians gallery.

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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avm247 Moderator Awarded for high skills in documentary architecture and aviation photography Charter MemberWed 05-Jun-13 09:34 PM
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#21. "RE: Photography room recommendations. "
In response to Reply # 0


Rancho Cordova, US
          

I think you've got a lot of great comments.

Seperate breakers for each wall, I'd go with as much diffused natural light as possible, skylight or Solatube type daylighting system. Of course, I'd also look into a way to block out all light, too, for directional lighting.

In the event you look to figure art (nudes) you may want obscure glass or acrylic block.

Local codes (including energy) may dictate what you can and can't do.

What's the budget?

Work with the architect.



Anthony

The Moderator Page and My Gallery
The important things in life are simple; the simple things are hard.

  

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limeyzen Silver Member Nikonian since 27th Aug 2011Fri 07-Jun-13 04:50 PM
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#22. "RE: Photography room recommendations. "
In response to Reply # 21


Waynesville, US
          

I come to this post late but hope this may be useful. In addition to all the other ideas I would recommend "structured wiring" to connect computer(s), phone, intercom or whatever to other parts of house. In this age of wireless everything this might seem overkill but in my experience is well worth the reliability even if redundant. If you go this route it would be worthwhile to consider it for the whole house, complete with dedicated distribution panel, preferably before the sheetrock goes up Go on Amazon for books on structured wiring if you are not familiar with it.

Geoff

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GMAV Gold Member Nikonian since 19th Sep 2007Sun 16-Jun-13 05:43 PM
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#23. "RE: Photography room recommendations. "
In response to Reply # 0


Johannesburg, ZA
          

Hi TashTS,

I have no time to read through all the answers the forum provided, but I like to help at face value. I am an architect apart from being a photographer living in South Africa. So our climate as well as the sun aspect are similar.
• The West orientation is not favourable for a studio, the light is not constant and becomes very harsh in the afternoon, apart from the heat lode you introduce by having windows of any kind. We tend not to use windows if we can help it in this position, even considering to insulate the wall against heat (at a cost of course).
• The choice of glass bricks has the effect of casting patterns aggravated by the pattern of the glass itself which tents to simulate wavy reflections on your subjects. I understand that might be a solution introduced by you council. So for me it's a no-go-zone.
• As you yourself suggested is the option of a sky-light. But this SL should face south. I must assume the house has a flat roof. I should take the shape of a “saw tooth” if you know what I mean. The vertical part is then the window, into which you can introduce an opening section for ventilation and the slating part forms a roof.
• For a studio natural light is not important and interferes with the white balance when you introduce other light sources i.e. studio light. My advice is not to introduce windows at all, money saved invest in studio lighting. Ventilation is absolute necessary and will be achieved with an electric extract. Don't forget to put a louver into your door panel, otherwise the fan will stall, creating a vacuum. Be careful, the fan must have a cowling otherwise the blades introduces a light flicker driving you crazy. A time saver is an arrangement of the light switch which could be a cord from the ceiling avoiding to get up to walk to the switch normally located at the door after you finished your set up. If you want to be elegant about it you use a sound activated switch which can be place anywhere. By clap of the hand it’s on or off.

Have fun building your house
Regards Gert
GMV-Studio@vodamail.co.za

  

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