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Forums Lobby MULTILINGUAL NIKONIANS English Café (Public) topic #87210
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Subject: "Time for a leap in optical engineering" Previous topic | Next topic
Chris Platt Silver Member Nikonian since 30th Sep 2012Tue 26-Feb-13 03:32 PM
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"Time for a leap in optical engineering"


Newburg, US
          

The resolution of sensors is improving so quickly that I am close to the indifference point for further advances due to the resolution limits of my glass as well as diffraction limits, and that has me contemplating the physics of refraction and what the next leaps in optical engineering might be.

And that lead me to this:

https://www.seas.harvard.edu/news-events/press-releases/flat-lens-offers-perfect-image

Next week, we'll go even further and discuss how a magnetic flux can be used to control refraction in a two-dimensional quantum metamaterial.

C'mon Nikon, catch up..

Visit my gallery.

  

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cosmicfires Silver Member Nikonian since 22nd Nov 2011Tue 26-Feb-13 06:48 PM
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#1. "RE: Time for a leap in optical engineering"
In response to Reply # 0


Lynnwood, US
          

What about chromatic abberations?

Can they make zoom lenses?

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

my website

  

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Chris Platt Silver Member Nikonian since 30th Sep 2012Tue 26-Feb-13 07:32 PM
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#2. "RE: Time for a leap in optical engineering"
In response to Reply # 1
Tue 26-Feb-13 08:33 PM by Chris Platt

Newburg, US
          

I'm presuming there wouldn't be any chromatic aberration once they develop the broadband metasurface - the collection of nanoantennas individually tuned and angled to create a phase shift in white light.

Chromatic aberration occurs because the index of refraction of glass varies with frequency, causing dispersion, so different frequencies don't converge at the same point. In glass lenses that is corrected by adding another glass element with a different index of refraction to correct the dispersion. If I'm understanding the concept properly, the nanoantennas in the metasurface would be individually tuned to change the direction of the light on a nanoscale. It wouldn't be passing through a material with a variable index of refraction, so chromatic aberration would be avoided in the same way that other optical aberrations are avoided.


Zoom? Good question. Since the tuning in these flat lenses seems to be fixed, perhaps two such flat lenses could interact to achieve a zoom capability. Ideally though, you are leaping ahead to the other topic; tuning refraction in a two dimensional quantum metamaterial with a magnetic flux, so one flat lens could achieve a variable level of refraction ability. But once I get past the correct spelling of "quantum" I've pretty much exhausted my competence on the subject.

Visit my gallery.

  

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kennoll Gold Member Donor Ribbon awarded for his generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Nikonian since 07th Feb 2011Tue 26-Feb-13 09:49 PM
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#3. "RE: Time for a leap in optical engineering"
In response to Reply # 2


Seattle, US
          

Maybe zooming would be a relation of the distance of the flat lens to the sensor?

Another question would be in the area of depth of field control. Since the lens apparently focuses everything it "sees" the the f-stop wouldn't make a difference so creating that nice bokeh wouldn't be possible? Or, perhaps manipulation of the f-stop controls the zoom?

Fascinating discovery.

Ken
Seattle, WA
My Gallery

  

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