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Martin Turner Moderator Expert professional PJ & PR photographer Nikonian since 19th Jun 2006Wed 09-Jan-13 05:57 PM
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"Jessops goes into administration in the UK"


Bidford on Avon, GB
          

Many UK members will be disappointed to hear that Jessops has gone into administration.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-20958659

I bought my OM-1 from Jessops in 1988, and my D2X in 2005. I guess I am as guilty as anyone of not supporting them, because I got my D3 in 2008 from Gray's of Westminster, and most of my equipment cabinet has come from online sources (including the Nikonians Proshop). Having bought into the Nikon system, I no longer felt I needed to try out cameras in the shop, and, equally, I could get first hand advice from other Nikonians.
Ah well.

M A R T I N • T U R N E R
http://art.martinturner.org.uk
http://www.martinturner.org.uk

Nikonians membership: my most important photographic investment, after the camera

My Nikonians blog, Learning from the Portrait Masters, http://blog.nikonians.org/martin_turner/

  

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Davidpeter1 Silver Member
09th Jan 2013
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15th Jan 2013
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OldCodger
17th Jan 2013
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                                                  Reply message Jessops - Could a phoenix rise from the ashes?
richardd300 Silver Member
25th Jan 2013
50
                                                  Reply message RE: Jessops - Could a phoenix rise from the ashes?
OldCodger
25th Jan 2013
51
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25th Jan 2013
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26th Jan 2013
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                                                  Reply message RE: Jessops - Could a phoenix rise from the ashes?
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27th Jan 2013
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28th Jan 2013
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28th Jan 2013
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28th Jan 2013
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28th Jan 2013
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28th Jan 2013
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28th Jan 2013
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Reply message This thread has taken an decidedly political slant.
avm247 Moderator
28th Jan 2013
61

Davidpeter1 Silver Member Nikonian since 07th Mar 2004Wed 09-Jan-13 06:20 PM
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#1. "RE: Jessops goes into administration in the UK"
In response to Reply # 0


Cardiff, GB
          

similar tale, I used to buy Fujichrome there since 1980, but the only major purchase was my D200, when I stayed out all night waiting for a great deal when they opened a big new store. All the other hardware bought elsewhere, but only this weekend I got 504 prints done at Jessops.

Don't feel too guilty though Martin - Jessops is just another victim of changing times, market forces and Britains still struggling economy.

For people around the world who don't know Jessops, it was Britains only big photo retail chain, and it's been a headline story on national news programmes.

David.

Cardiff,Britain.

BE A BLOOD + BONE MARROW DONOR TO FIGHT CANCER, YOU MAY SAVE A LIFE.
http://www.nikonians-images.com/galleries/showgallery.php?cat=500&ppuser=16427

  

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jbloom Gold Member Awarded for the continuous and generous sharing of his high level expertise and his always encouraging comments in several forums. Nikonian since 15th Jul 2004Wed 09-Jan-13 07:07 PM
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#2. "RE: Jessops goes into administration in the UK"
In response to Reply # 0


Wethersfield, US
          

Sad, yet probably inevitable. Here in the US, few of the brick-and-mortar camera shops survive. It's just the way of the Internet-enabled world, I'm afraid.

-- Jon
Wethersfield, CT, USA
Connecticut High School Sports Photos

  

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quenton8 Silver Member Awarded for bringing his experience to the Nikonians community helping members with printing and the use of post-processing software from the perspective of an IT professional. Nikonian since 11th Apr 2010Wed 09-Jan-13 11:46 PM
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#3. "RE: Jessops goes into administration in the UK"
In response to Reply # 2


Toronto, CA
          

Hm -- over here in "North America" (being Canadian) "... into Administration" sounds like someone changed jobs and became a "manager of some kind".

I get the point -- Chapter 11, Bankruptcy, Protection from Creditors.

Learning a new term is neat though -- too bad when it happens to a company in photo business!

----
Dennis Smith.

  

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ScottChapin Moderator Awarded for his high level skills in various areas, including Aviation and Birds Photography Charter MemberThu 10-Jan-13 09:04 AM
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#5. "RE: Jessops goes into administration in the UK"
In response to Reply # 3


Powder Springs, US
          

We call it receivership.

Scott Chapin
Powder Springs, GA, USA
Nikonians Team Member

  

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Davidpeter1 Silver Member Nikonian since 07th Mar 2004Thu 10-Jan-13 07:34 PM
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#8. "RE: Jessops goes into administration in the UK"
In response to Reply # 3


Cardiff, GB
          

yes - so many different nice accountants terms for putting a couple of thousand people out of work, but in plain language:

"they've gone bust"

David.

Cardiff,Britain.

BE A BLOOD + BONE MARROW DONOR TO FIGHT CANCER, YOU MAY SAVE A LIFE.
http://www.nikonians-images.com/galleries/showgallery.php?cat=500&ppuser=16427

  

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Scotty Silver Member Nikonian since 07th Feb 2002Thu 10-Jan-13 12:10 AM
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#4. "RE: Jessops goes into administration in the UK"
In response to Reply # 0


Ely, Cambridgeshire, GB
          

I bought my D50 from them but little else - I never managed to find a branch where the staff knew anything. Hated the shop won't miss them... I could have been unlucky though. Saying that, they were the only shop I found where the staff openly lied to me...

D2Xs + AF20-35mm f2.8 + AF35-70mm f2.8 + AF80-200mm f2.8

or

FE + Nikkor 50mm f1.8 AIS

Hunger pays a heavy price to the shining Gods of speed and steel

Check out my website...
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Alex

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ecossephoto Registered since 21st Jun 2012Thu 10-Jan-13 10:34 AM
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#6. "RE: Jessops goes into administration in the UK"
In response to Reply # 4
Thu 10-Jan-13 10:34 AM by ecossephoto

GB
          

I got my F80 & 28-105 from them.

The initial salesman was great and left me with a few choices and what turns out to be great advice. I went away to think about it and when I went back to buy he had left and the other salesman was a complete fool.
The only time I have used them since was when they price matched a Canon S70.
Maybe an opportunity to pick up a bargain D800 & lens or two but I doubt it.

  

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richardd300 Silver Member Nikonian since 19th Apr 2009Thu 10-Jan-13 02:21 PM
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#7. "RE: Jessops goes into administration in the UK"
In response to Reply # 6
Thu 10-Jan-13 02:22 PM by richardd300

Dyserth, GB
          

1982, my Olympus OM10 and 1990 my OM4Ti both from Jessops. In 2008 my D300 and 2010 my D7000. My first copy of the D7000 was faulty and they changed it without argument. I bought my D800 from London Camera Exchange, but who knows how long they will last either as I rarely see anyone in the shop! I like to take a lens with me and try the camera out, those days are numbered I fear.

Very sad and like Woolworth's and many more before them, another high street name bites the dust.

Richard

Visit my Nikonians gallery

Visit my website www.pixels4u.co.uk
The important thing is not to stop questioning. Curiosity has its own reason for existing. Einstein

  

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HBB Moderator Hal is an expert in several areas, including CLS Awarded for his excellent article contributions to the Resources. Charter MemberThu 10-Jan-13 09:07 PM
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#9. "RE: Jessops goes into administration in the UK"
In response to Reply # 0


Phoenix, US
          

Martin:

I am fortunate that I am still purchasing my eqiupment from the store that opened in September of 1972. I was one of the original partners in this venture and forty years later, following the demise of several established competitors, it is one of only two brick and mortar stores providing full service to advanced amateur and professional photographers in the Phoenix metropolitan area.

On another note, it is getting hard to find labs capable of doing professional quality B/W and color film processing.

It has been an interesting evolution to watch.

Regards,

HBB in Phoenix, Arizona
Nikonian Team Member

Photography is a journey with no conceivable destination.

  

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agitater Gold Member Nikonian since 18th Jan 2007Thu 10-Jan-13 09:39 PM
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#10. "RE: Jessops goes into administration in the UK"
In response to Reply # 0


Toronto, CA
          

So which operators are next on the UK chopping block? Curry's Digital? PC World? London Camera Exchange (I hope not)?

Jacob's demise was a bit of a shock last year, but Jessop's imminent demise is not really shock at all. Jessop's had/has way too many upper-end high street locations and the corresponding rents to pay. Jessop's should have simply walked away from half their leases over the past couple of years since their refinancing. Can't keep a shop, let alone a chain of them, in the black with too many of those kinds of leases during an apparently never-ending recession.

They come, they go, new ones show up to fill the vacant shops on new leases six months or a year down the road.

Jacob's closure bothered me, as do Adam's complaints at Sunrise Digital (my favourite small camera shop in London) on Tottenham Court Road. Adam has been complaining for almost three years about a steadily increasing recession and I'm afraid he's just going to pull out and reture while he's still got some hair left on his head.

London Camera Exchange locations seem to be doing a steady business in London (although their numbers are down as well, and I have no idea how their non-London locations are doing). Still, I'd bet real money that their used gear is helping pay the biggest portion of the rent each month these days.

My Photo.Net Gallery
My Nikonians Gallery

Howard Carson

  

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briantilley Moderator Deep knowledge of bodies and lens; high level photography skills Nikonian since 26th Jan 2003Thu 10-Jan-13 09:46 PM
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#11. "RE: Jessops goes into administration in the UK"
In response to Reply # 10


Paignton, GB
          

>London Camera Exchange locations seem to be doing a steady
>business in London (although their numbers are down as well,
>and I have no idea how their non-London locations are doing).

The LCE (small) branch in Paignton, Devon (my local town) closed down last year

I suspect they suffered from being only a few miles away from Mifsuds in Brixham, which is a very good store and seems to be doing OK still.

Brian
Welsh Nikonian

  

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richardd300 Silver Member Nikonian since 19th Apr 2009Thu 10-Jan-13 10:22 PM
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#12. "RE: Jessops goes into administration in the UK"
In response to Reply # 11
Thu 10-Jan-13 10:23 PM by richardd300

Dyserth, GB
          

The bottom line is that sadly buyers may go to look at high street retailers stock, then trawl the net and buy a lot cheaper. Jessops was owned by HSBC for the last years of it's life after falling casualty to the financial downturn.

My local retailer (not Nikon, but Sigma) is Cambrian Photography in Colwyn Bay, North Wales who sell new and second hand Nikon and other makes and I always give them the opportunity to meet web prices. They allowed me to try out, away from the shop, the Sigma 150-500mm and 50-500mm OS models. They also told me that if after a week the lens didn't suit they would give me a refund. They matched the web price. This is what I'll miss, like minded folks who are passionate about photography. I hope they survive where Jessops have not.

Richard

Visit my Nikonians gallery

Visit my website www.pixels4u.co.uk
The important thing is not to stop questioning. Curiosity has its own reason for existing. Einstein

  

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agitater Gold Member Nikonian since 18th Jan 2007Thu 10-Jan-13 11:19 PM
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#13. "RE: Jessops goes into administration in the UK"
In response to Reply # 12


Toronto, CA
          

I think that the practice of showrooming is getting more than a bit excessive and a lot more than a bit disgusting. Treating shop owners and shop staff as though they're nothing more than reference libraries is, in my view, callously selfish.

I respect the idea of giving shops a shot at matching the item price being flogged by an online-only retailer, but it's not a practice that shops can maintain for any significant variety or volume of products.

My Photo.Net Gallery
My Nikonians Gallery

Howard Carson

  

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TZ750F Registered since 06th Nov 2012Fri 11-Jan-13 12:16 AM
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#15. "RE: Jessops goes into administration in the UK"
In response to Reply # 13


Brisbane, AU
          

>I think that the practice of showrooming is getting more than
>a bit excessive and a lot more than a bit disgusting. Treating
>shop owners and shop staff as though they're nothing more than
>reference libraries is, in my view, callously selfish.
>
>I respect the idea of giving shops a shot at matching the item
>price being flogged by an online-only retailer, but it's not a
>practice that shops can maintain for any significant variety
>or volume of products.
>

Agree wholeheartedley, but conversely, the trend toward employing the cheapest assistants available, usually kids with no knowledge whatsoever, is not exactly looking after your customer base.
I remember Jessops from when I lived in the UK, prior to the internet age they put a lot of small independent stores out of business with aggressive pricing and marketing strategies, so I suppose for some
what goes around comes around?


  

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ScottChapin Moderator Awarded for his high level skills in various areas, including Aviation and Birds Photography Charter MemberFri 11-Jan-13 12:58 AM
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#16. "RE: Jessops goes into administration in the UK"
In response to Reply # 13


Powder Springs, US
          

Yes, but it can get a bit more complex than that. I remember getting a quote on an F100 from a brick an mortar. After having mustered the money, I went back and they increased the price on me when the internet prices were dropping.

I reminded them of the price they had quoted and noted that internet prices were dropping, but they didn't want to honor their original quote, even though it was higher than internet pricing. B&H got my business.

So sometimes supporting your local brick and mortar is not easy to do.

Scott Chapin
Powder Springs, GA, USA
Nikonians Team Member

  

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richardd300 Silver Member Nikonian since 19th Apr 2009Fri 11-Jan-13 06:45 AM
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#18. "RE: Jessops goes into administration in the UK"
In response to Reply # 13
Fri 11-Jan-13 07:08 AM by richardd300

Dyserth, GB
          

<<I think that the practice of showrooming is getting more than a bit excessive and a lot more than a bit disgusting. Treating shop owners and shop staff as though they're nothing more than reference libraries is, in my view, callously selfish.>>

Rubbish Howard. I've known the owners for years and they tell all of us who regularly visit them that they always appreciate the opportunity being given to them for a possible sale. I've bought about as much of my equipment from them as I have on line and I certainly do not use them as just a showroom. When I bought the Sigma I didn't know whether the 150-500mm or 50-500mm would suit my needs. By being given the opportunity to try both I was given the guidanceto make the right choice.

I have already said that the shop to which I refer are not Nikon dealers, but Sigma, Leica etc. So, I've bought Sigma's from them, all my Nikon's from Jessops and London Camera Exchange. Hardly callous and selfish!

Sadly Howard your high handed and sometimes frankly absurd comments are what I have come to expect now and again. If one cannot share their experiences here, without fear of rebuke, then it's a great shame.

Richard


Visit my Nikonians gallery

Visit my website www.pixels4u.co.uk
The important thing is not to stop questioning. Curiosity has its own reason for existing. Einstein

  

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Nitehawk5169 Gold Member Nikonian since 22nd Feb 2010Fri 11-Jan-13 10:34 AM
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#20. "RE: Jessops goes into administration in the UK"
In response to Reply # 18


Williamstown, US
          

Howard, Tony, & Richard,

>I think that the practice of showrooming is getting more than
>a bit excessive and a lot more than a bit disgusting. Treating
>shop owners and shop staff as though they're nothing more than
>reference libraries is, in my view, callously selfish.
>
>I respect the idea of giving shops a shot at matching the item
>price being flogged by an online-only retailer, but it's not a
>practice that shops can maintain for any significant variety
>or volume of products.
>

>Agree wholeheartedley, but conversely, the trend toward employing the cheapest >assistants available, usually kids with no knowledge whatsoever, is not exactly looking >after your customer base.
>I remember Jessops from when I lived in the UK, prior to the internet age they put a lot >of small independent stores out of business with aggressive pricing and marketing >strategies, so I suppose for some
>what goes around comes around?
>

>Rubbish Howard. I've known the owners for years and they tell all of us who regularly >visit them that they always appreciate the opportunity being given to them for a >possible sale. I've bought about as much of my equipment from them as I have on line >and I certainly do not use them as just a showroom. When I bought the Sigma I didn't >know whether the 150-500mm or 50-500mm would suit my needs. By being given the >opportunity to try both I was given the guidanceto make the right choice.

>I have already said that the shop to which I refer are not Nikon dealers, but Sigma, Leica >etc. So, I've bought Sigma's from them, all my Nikon's from Jessops and London Camera >Exchange. Hardly callous and selfish!


I believe we are all saying the same thing but in different references. Back in 1978, when I had just got married and my ex decided she wanted to get her Masters Degree, I had to get a part time job to supplement my 40 hr a wk job. I knew, from back in high school, a person who was a regional manager of a camera store chain. Because I knew how a camera worked (f-stop, ss, & ASA) I was employed to sell at a Mall shopping center complex. I could spend an hour explaining the differences between one model of Nikon and another Canon. The customer would say thank you and they would give it some thought and come back later. Everybody in the store knew that they would head across the Mall parking lot to the jewelry/home appliance/stereo/CAMERA store. Why? Because it was cheaper. Look across the US and every small town has a downtown with vacant storefronts because people find it cheaper and more convenient to shop at Walmart. Does anybody in Walmart know anything about the differences between different models of cameras? NO! My first D90 I bought at a BestBuy because I wanted to get back into shooting since my film days had long past. I lucked out because at the time the D90 was the best non-pro DX model (in my opinion) available but there was nobody there that could have told me that there was a difference between DX and FX!

As I have moved further into cameras and their accessories I started to use B&H because I could get free shipping through my NAPP membership and because of where I live it would be there next day. I have since changed that procedure when I wanted a Nikor TC20 and B&H was backordered. I found a camera shop, Allen's Camera, which had it in stock and the price was NYC competitive. The only drawback was I had to pay sales tax. Since then I have patronized Allen's for a D3s and a D4 and many accessories. Yes I am paying more but I have knowledgable people helping me. You can bring things back if you are not happy. I got a discount on a UT-1 for my D4 and everything was there. Someone had bought it and never took it out of the box and returned it. I checked with B&H later and got it for $100 cheaper. Allen knows that if he takes care of his customer the customer will take care of him. I am sure times are tight for him as it is for the rest of the camera community.

Times are changing with some of our stalwart companies going under. If it really matters to you then you have choices to make. Are we part of the solution or part of the problem?

Mike

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Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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richardd300 Silver Member Nikonian since 19th Apr 2009Fri 11-Jan-13 10:48 AM
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#21. "RE: Jessops goes into administration in the UK"
In response to Reply # 20
Fri 11-Jan-13 10:49 AM by richardd300

Dyserth, GB
          

<<Are we part of the solution or part of the problem?>>

Both I think, cause and effect. I must admit that with Jessop's they were not always stocked with the most knowledgeable staff. At least not since the days where they accepted part exchange where the staff needed to be more educated in camera/lens technology. The chain fought to stay alive, but in the end they were making too much loss and HSBC said enough's enough. Whereas, London Camera Exchange and local small retailers like Cambrian are staffed with folks who have a great interest in all things photographic. basically, their a good place to visit

We live now in the lands of greed. The last 25 years have been the years of plenty for many and perhaps some of old ways must return to establish solid foundations to move forward. The good days for many, or most, are gone and I often think "just relax, enjoy what one has and stop surfing for what may be coming next". I do find this "new world" sad in many ways, but I've never been a hard nosed business man who must be exactly that to survive.

My dear late mother will be saying somewhere "you made this new world, now you have to repair it"

Richard

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Nitehawk5169 Gold Member Nikonian since 22nd Feb 2010Fri 11-Jan-13 11:18 AM
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#23. "RE: Jessops goes into administration in the UK"
In response to Reply # 21


Williamstown, US
          

Richard,


>Both I think, cause and effect. I must admit that with Jessop's they were not always >stocked with the most knowledgeable staff. At least not since the days where they >accepted part exchange where the staff needed to be more educated in camera/lens >technology. The chain fought to stay alive, but in the end they were making too much >loss and HSBC said enough's enough. Whereas, London Camera Exchange and local >small retailers like Cambrian are staffed with folks who have a great interest in all >things photographic. basically, their a good place to visit

>We live now in the lands of greed. The last 25 years have been the years of plenty for >many and perhaps some of old ways must return to establish solid foundations to move >forward. The good days for many, or most, are gone and I often think "just relax, enjoy >what one has and stop surfing for what may be coming next". I do find this "new world" >sad in many ways, but I've never been a hard nosed business man who must be exactly >that to survive.

>My dear late mother will be saying somewhere "you made this new world, now you have >to repair it"


It sounds as though you have a couple of good shops still in business. Most of the forum responses when Nikonians ask about the abilities of particular lenses are answered with a "rent it for a weekend". The fact that you can decide between a 50-500 and a 150-500 by trying them both is definitely a plus for you. That is the kind of company you can be happy to deal with. I believe my outlook is similar to yours. I have been trying to enjoy what I have and when the pressures of every day life gets too intence I grab my camera and hike into the solitude of the woods.

I was going to ask you why you were up so early and then I remembered you are 5 (?) hrs ahead of me. By the way I love the isles. I've been to Ireland in 1988 and England in 2011. Next time it will have to be to Scotland.

Mike

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richardd300 Silver Member Nikonian since 19th Apr 2009Fri 11-Jan-13 12:30 PM
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#24. "RE: Jessops goes into administration in the UK"
In response to Reply # 23


Dyserth, GB
          

Glad you enjoy the UK and please don't forget Wales when considering Scotland I am up at 5 a.m. usually anyway, an insomniac I'm afraid.

Richard

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agitater Gold Member Nikonian since 18th Jan 2007Fri 11-Jan-13 11:17 AM
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#22. "RE: Jessops goes into administration in the UK"
In response to Reply # 18
Fri 11-Jan-13 11:20 AM by agitater

Toronto, CA
          

>Rubbish Howard. I've known the owners for years and they tell
>all of us who regularly visit them that they always appreciate
>the opportunity being given to them for a possible sale. I've
>bought about as much of my equipment from them as I have on
>line and I certainly do not use them as just a showroom. When
>I bought the Sigma I didn't know whether the 150-500mm or
>50-500mm would suit my needs. By being given the opportunity
>to try both I was given the guidanceto make the right choice.

Not rubbish at all Richard. What you've described in the paragraph above is not showrooming - merely legitimate shopping. Showrooming, widely written about and just as widely derided by an awful lot of writers around the world these days, is the practice of deliberately using retail shops only to do a hands-on check of a particular product - without any intention of buying - in order to prepare for an online purchase.

>I have already said that the shop to which I refer are not
>Nikon dealers, but Sigma, Leica etc. So, I've bought Sigma's
>from them, all my Nikon's from Jessops and London Camera
>Exchange. Hardly callous and selfish!

My comment on showrooming was a general one, and you're not a showroomer in the first place. My comment could not possibly have been directed at you and nobody else seems to have misinterpreted it that way. But I understand your reaction considering you did not understand the definition of the despicable practice of showrooming.

>Sadly Howard your high handed and sometimes frankly absurd
>comments are what I have come to expect now and again. If one
>cannot share their experiences here, without fear of rebuke,
>then it's a great shame.

You misunderstood. Thank you for the description of my contributions. Thank you also for the hyperbole. It's always good to receive an angry review from time to time.

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Howard Carson

  

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limeyzen Silver Member Nikonian since 27th Aug 2011Fri 11-Jan-13 03:38 PM
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#25. "RE: Jessops goes into administration in the UK"
In response to Reply # 22
Fri 11-Jan-13 03:46 PM by limeyzen

Waynesville, US
          

Perhaps there is a justifiable need to differentiate between large chain stores e.g. Best Buy and "mom and pop" stores when it comes to "showrooming". When I reentered photography 18 months ago I was looking for the most cost effective Nikon DSLR (to me) that would enable using my existing Nikor lenses from my N90s days. Similar story as a prior poster. I knew nothing about the digital world or the existence of Nikonians So, I went into our local Best Buy and inquired about what would fit my needs and budget. An hour and 3 salespeople later I left with, from the last person, a "guess" that the D90 was my best bet and the only way they could be sure was for me to bring in lenses to try them which I did. Long story short I then did some price research and found a Nikon refurbed D90 from a major mail order house signifigantly less than Best Buy could or would sell theirs at. Showrooming? Perhaps.

Cut to my visit to Minehead GB last year (I'm an ex pat Brit born and raised in Plymouth, also spent 9 yrs in TO) where I found a small privately owned camera store that had a used D90 body cheaper, taking into account conversion pounds to dollars, than I paid for mine! Didn't buy it but spent time talking with the knowledgeable owner and went back several times for cards, a remote cable etc.

My point is (finally )I think it is incumbent on large chain stores to build into their business model the forecastable costs of "showrooming" (and the trade offs of hiring knowlegeable staff) but when it comes to small private shops maybe the customer has a larger responsibilty and consideration to take into account. Perhaps at the end of my verbosity we are violently in agreement

PS I realized that this is off subject to OP and I apologize.

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dagoldst Silver Member Nikonian since 02nd Dec 2012Sat 12-Jan-13 01:29 PM
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#28. "RE: Jessops goes into administration in the UK"
In response to Reply # 13


Little Rock, US
          

>I think that the practice of showrooming is getting more than
>a bit excessive and a lot more than a bit disgusting.

And these days, it's unnecessary - there are to many good review sites like DP review, Imaging Resource, SLR Gear, as well as URLs like Nikonians that leave a potential buyer well informed if they take the time.

David

"Sawed that board three times and it is still too short... "

  

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richardd300 Silver Member Nikonian since 19th Apr 2009Sat 12-Jan-13 01:38 PM
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#29. "RE: Jessops goes into administration in the UK"
In response to Reply # 28
Sat 12-Jan-13 01:40 PM by richardd300

Dyserth, GB
          

Great reviews on cars, furniture, electrical's and other high price items too, but few buy on-line without visiting a showroom. Somehow there's nothing like the tactile approach I only visit a "showroom", although I prefer the words "retailer", with an intention to buy, otherwise I wait for the exhibitions and road shows. There again if I were a retailer, then perhaps I'd get hot under the collar at people browsing and not buying.

Richard

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Visit my website www.pixels4u.co.uk
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dagoldst Silver Member Nikonian since 02nd Dec 2012Sun 13-Jan-13 04:01 AM
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#30. "RE: Jessops goes into administration in the UK"
In response to Reply # 29


Little Rock, US
          

>but few buy on-line without visiting a showroom

I'm on my 4th Nikon DLSR, 6th Nikon SLR in total. I don't feel a need to play with new cameras anymore in showrooms to decide. Same with lenses.

I guess it's a matter of preference on handling a new camera model.

David

"Sawed that board three times and it is still too short... "

  

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richardd300 Silver Member Nikonian since 19th Apr 2009Sun 13-Jan-13 09:05 AM
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#31. "RE: Jessops goes into administration in the UK"
In response to Reply # 30


Dyserth, GB
          

Visiting a showroom may mean the difference between taking home a good camera or a faulty camera. This then avoids the dispatching and the wait while a replacement is received back.

Richard

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ScottChapin Moderator Awarded for his high level skills in various areas, including Aviation and Birds Photography Charter MemberThu 10-Jan-13 11:36 PM
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#14. "RE: Jessops goes into administration in the UK"
In response to Reply # 11


Powder Springs, US
          

My namesake, the Deacon Samuel Chapin and his wife Penny, were from Paignton. I know, I digress.

Scott Chapin
Powder Springs, GA, USA
Nikonians Team Member

  

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briantilley Moderator Deep knowledge of bodies and lens; high level photography skills Nikonian since 26th Jan 2003Fri 11-Jan-13 07:59 AM
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#19. "RE: Jessops goes into administration in the UK"
In response to Reply # 14
Fri 11-Jan-13 08:00 AM by briantilley

Paignton, GB
          

Small world!

Brian
Welsh Nikonian

  

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James23p Moderator Awarded for his wide variety of skills, a true generalist both in film and digital photography Nikonian since 25th Apr 2004Fri 11-Jan-13 04:47 AM
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#17. "RE: Jessops goes into administration in the UK"
In response to Reply # 0


Memphis, US
          

For me I hate that so many are losing their jobs and I was in Lodon years ago in the Navy and remember visiting High Street as the dreaded tourist it was a cool place I'm sure it is very different now.

Here in Memphis just 10 years ago we had atleast 10 camera stores maybe 12. 6 I think were Wolf a large chain and several smaller Mom and Pop stores well now there is just one Mom and Pop, Memphis Photo Supply. They are well staffed and have real photographers as their staff. I use them for much of my everyday stuff and occasionaly I buy a lens there I recently bought my Tokina 100 Af-D Macro there since he came close to B&H not all the way but close enough for me. But they seem to sell all the other stuff you need like studio stuff, Leica, used stuff, paper, chemicals etc.

Again for me its more about people losing their jobs it just pains me.

Jim

Share, Learn and Inspire
www.nikonians.org




I will use film until the last roll and last lab are gone. Go Navy

  

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Bass rock Registered since 21st Dec 2007Fri 11-Jan-13 04:13 PM
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#26. "RE: Jessops goes into administration in the UK"
In response to Reply # 0


Scotland, GB
          

And now it has just been announced that all the Jessops shops are to close at the end of trading today (Friday), with stock returned to suppliers. No chance of last minute bargains.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-20992125

Bill
North Berwick, Scotland

My Website - My Nikonians Gallery

  

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richardd300 Silver Member Nikonian since 19th Apr 2009Fri 11-Jan-13 05:38 PM
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#27. "RE: Jessops goes into administration in the UK"
In response to Reply # 26


Dyserth, GB
          

Certainly a fast demolition job by the administrators. 2000 employees now join the ever lengthening Job Centre queue. Very sad.

Richard

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Visit my website www.pixels4u.co.uk
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OldCodger Registered since 15th Oct 2011Sun 13-Jan-13 05:47 PM
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#32. "RE: Jessops goes into administration in the UK"
In response to Reply # 27


Sawbridgeworth Hertfordshire, GB
          

Yes it is sad, I only used them a while back when they still had a local store, but they overpaid on the rental lease and had to close a while back.
From what I gather the stock was almost all unpaid for and no one would fund it any more. So in the end the administrator's hands were tied. In effect they had no title to stock so could not really continue trading. By then no one apparently thought their trading model could be made to work, so no one would buy them out and it had to close.
They did have an on-line presence but like too many stores they appear to have fallen between two stools, neither big or good enough for bricks and mortar nor for internet trading. Perhaps the only future for such trades is as parts of large enterprises where they can get the footfall but even then I have doubts.
Certainly a new model is needed for many such businesses. For far too many, me included, Amazon is becoming the only act in town. With family health issues and now physical mobility problems they were the only way I could practically buy my D7000. Unfortunately my ongoing personal issues mean that the D7000 is now not getting the use I planned.

  

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agitater Gold Member Nikonian since 18th Jan 2007Sun 13-Jan-13 07:01 PM
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#33. "RE: Jessops goes into administration in the UK"
In response to Reply # 32


Toronto, CA
          

>Certainly a new model is needed for many such businesses. For
>far too many, me included, Amazon is becoming the only act in
>town. With family health issues and now physical mobility
>problems they were the only way I could practically buy my
>D7000.

Amazon and many other warehouse-sourced online retailers, are structured around brutal working conditions for laughably low pay imposed upon the thousands of order pickers employed by the third-party agencies contracted to staff the massive fulfillment operations. Everybody has to understand that there's no magic potion which helps to avoid such problems. Heavy discounting by profitable operations is essentially supported by seriously overworked, grossly underpaid labor who have no working benefits and who are paid too little to afford their own medical insurance, and who are fired at the slightest provocation. Such workers labor in awful pressure cookers in suburban-remote areas dotted around the U.S., Canada, Europe and elsewhere.

Too many well-researched articles recently on the subject have completely turned me off Amazon and many other online retailers. Some people have responded to my concerns by stating, "At least those warehouse pickers have jobs. That's saying something in this economy." It's inadvertently the same argument used by all taskmasters, plantation owners, and robber barons throughout the centuries.

So basically, I agree with some earlier comments in the thread - the systems have to be reset because the current models are financially, morally and ethically unsustainable. Really - I'm done with all the online retailers who use fulfillment operators.

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richardd300 Silver Member Nikonian since 19th Apr 2009Tue 15-Jan-13 06:54 AM
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#34. "RE: Jessops goes into administration in the UK"
In response to Reply # 33


Dyserth, GB
          

Another blow today. Music and DVD chain HMV is to appoint an administrator, making it the latest casualty on the High Street and putting about 4,350 jobs at risk.

Richard

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OldCodger Registered since 15th Oct 2011Tue 15-Jan-13 07:11 AM
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#35. "RE: Jessops goes into administration in the UK"
In response to Reply # 34


Sawbridgeworth Hertfordshire, GB
          

Yes Richard, another sad day for the high street. I do have to repeat my comment about the problems of many current business models.
1) Access to high streets is so difficult due to parking restrictions
2) Poor alternative transport
3) Stores fail to have items in stock in the store requiring repeated visits.
4) Different stores are often in different towns preventing comparison of what they might offer.
5) In HMV's case they were not fast enough to leap off the CD and DVD sector when that became a fast reducing segment. Carrying a full inventory of choices in every shop was not viable so from the buyer's view point the retail proposition also became non viable.
I am not a big buyer of either CDs or DVDs, in fact I have only ever bought them as gifts for relations and always via mail order due to postal costs and the logistical issues mentioned above.
While I understand Howard's concerns I am not convinced that they are realistic these days due to the issues outlined above.
The latest loss of jobs is a sad indictment of the standards of management and the lack of foresight shown by many companies when judging their business models.

  

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agitater Gold Member Nikonian since 18th Jan 2007Tue 15-Jan-13 01:24 PM
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#36. "RE: Jessops goes into administration in the UK"
In response to Reply # 35


Toronto, CA
          

>Yes Richard, another sad day for the high street. I do have
>to repeat my comment about the problems of many current
>business models.
>1) Access to high streets is so difficult due to parking
>restrictions
>2) Poor alternative transport

Wow - you're opening a horrible large can of worms now I think. And I agree with you. But solid business models in the segments being raised here don't sink or swim because of convenient vehicle parking. I think too that in respect of major cities and large towns, discussing efficient, timely, high volume and conveniently accessible public transit systems in the same breath as we (me too) complain about lack of convenient parking space for relatively inefficient private vehicles is a logical dead end. My response here though, is not directed at you personally but at the issues in general.

I drive a car - a lot - and I trade in my existing vehicle for a new one every 3-4 years. I grew up with cars just as so many other Nikonians. I drive daily for business, general transport to and from home, and so on. But when I'm at my office in downtown Toronto, I use the subway/underground, buses and trains to run errands, shop, go to meetings, etc., and I walk/wander/explore with my camera. Finding a parking spot in downtown Toronto can actually occasionally be quite easy, but the traffic crawl has over the past 15 years become awful. I don't care if it takes me an additional 30 minutes to get where I'm going or if I save 30 minutes, as long as I'm not sitting in crawling traffic burning fuel and unable to do anything but sit there and listen to talk radio or a podcast of some sort. I'd rather walk and take public transit than sit in my car buring fuel.

For senior citizens less able to negotiate transit systems and who also need, for personal reasons, the convenience of a personal vehicle because they live happily in an area that has attractions and personal history which outweigh other considerations, something has to give. But again, convenient access to an HMV shop (or any other music, video, movie, CD/DVD/Blu-ray/whatever shop) is not what makes or breaks the business model.

>3) Stores fail to have items in stock in the store requiring
>repeated visits.

So what happened to all the great, sometimes world-renowned (Sam The Record Man), music shops which evolved to encompass all forms of digital entertainment media? Sam's was located on the Yonge Street tourist strip in Toronto, half a block from a tube station, and close to all sorts of parking. Same with Virgin Records in Times Square in New York (except for the parking thing because driving anywhere in midtown, downtown or lower Manhattan is like driving in central London - complete lunacy unless your work requires it). The brick & mortar entertainment media business was devastated not by illegal downloading or lousy parking or any other such things. It was ruined rather by the fact that you can sample a song or a movie online, just like you could in a shop, before deciding to buy it online and either download it on the spot or wait a couple of days for the CD or DVD to shop in your mailbox. There's no comparison here to camera shops.

>4) Different stores are often in different towns preventing
>comparison of what they might offer.
>5) In HMV's case they were not fast enough to leap off the CD
>and DVD sector when that became a fast reducing segment.
>Carrying a full inventory of choices in every shop was not
>viable so from the buyer's view point the retail proposition
>also became non viable.

But online music and movie merchants (including iTunes), don't carry a "full inventory" either. I'm not sure what "full inventory of choices" means in this context. Does it mean 'the thing I'm looking for right now' or 'the esoteric items that are hard to find in any situation because they're not widely distributed or licensed' or 'they're not available because of a progressive rollout in different formats'? Again, the convenience factor and more complete online shopping experience that has developed since 2005 is simply a satisfying enough experience to trump shop-going. Whether or not that bespeaks a growing indolence overarching importantly large segments of society in general is a whole other discussion I think. The fact remains that online sampling, purchasing and fulfillment of music and movie and TV entertainment has outpaced the capabilities of any conceivably profitable brick & mortar operation. You can't experience a camera or lens online, you can't see what a sample photo really looks like online (because the photo has gone through too many editing procedures and has been optimized or is being viewed on one's own poorly calibrated monitor in a browser - it might as well be completely faked, good or bad). Music and movies can be sampled accurately enough online for a proper buying decision even if your speakers and monitor are not up to the mark.

In my opinion, brick & mortar camera shops are being killed by online discounting combined with recessionary economies and new product fatigue and hyper-competition amongst makers. Nothing to do with convenient access, not to mention that very few camera shops or music/DVD/movie shops have by any measure been deliberately located poorly over the years, and additionally not to mention that convenient access for some may be regarded by a few others as terribly inconvenient. I think in these sorts of discussions we must be fair and expansive in our assessments of what constitutes convenient access.

>While I understand Howard's concerns I am not convinced that
>they are realistic these days due to the issues outlined
>above.
>The latest loss of jobs is a sad indictment of the standards
>of management and the lack of foresight shown by many
>companies when judging their business models.

How can we say that we'd rather buy camera gear online? On what basis do we make such statements? I've made them, occasionally, and now I regret such statements. After all, with Jacob's and Jessop's dead in the UK, and with a couple of London Camera Exchange locations shuttered, and with some private shops completely gone as well, can we not please look at the competitively discounted margins at which goods are being sold these days? Does anyone think there's room to move or manage or invest given those razor thin margins? Add to that the inevitable doses of poor management and poor decision making about opening new shops in a chain or keeping some poor performers in a chain open, and you've got a recipe for disaster. From time to time, most of us gain great satisfaction from finding the lowest price for the exact product we want, but when that becomes the norm rather than the special occasion, don't expect the range of choice and the variety of merchandise we enjoyed in brick & mortar shops (or the shops themselves) to last much longer. When it all goes online and we have to go to some centrally located manufacturer's showroom in order to merely physically hold a new camera body before making a purchasing decision online, we'll know the meaning of real inconvenience. Admittedly, all of these so-called problems are first-world issues and absurdities in and of themselves. But if the subject here is business, at some point we've got to concede that the blandishments of online purchasing and the ease with which most of us can simply Click-to-Buy has, I think, forced poor reasoning into all of our considerations from time to time.

Surely the access, in a shop, to a hands-on product experience and face-to-face discussion about a product while interacting with shop staff and shop customers (e.g., as Richard described it earlier), and the concomittant option to exchange a product over the counter or lodge a complaint directly with a shopkeeper trumps parking and public transit inconvenience. By comparison, participating in or being drawn in by the utterly (and by definition) impersonal online shopping experience is vapid - no sales help, too much reliance on so-called customer reviews of products (too many of which are simply false or deliberately planted), aggravation from having to go through the effort of shipping a defective product back to a supplier and hoping upon hope that it won't be lost in the shuffle), among other inconveniences.

Existing brick & mortar shops are being beaten up for too many days each year by showroomers (by definition using invested merchants' inventories as nothing more than inspection libraries). Many of those shops employ staff who, from time to time, are actively criticised for occasionally mis-reading a legitimate customer as a showroomer. Both issues are pervasive.

I agree that many existing retail business models are failing, but for the reasons I've expressed. If traditional business models are failing, then smart entrepreneurs will reset the system. While I'm interested in the analysis, I really don't care otherwise about failing business models because such failures merely create space for new business models to enter and plead their cases (and employ those thrown out of work if they're able to improve or add certain skills). I'm looking forward to seeing new business models in action. But online purchasing from high-volume discounters (Amazon included) is a mug's game. The wizard behind that curtain is not managing a bunch of happy munchkins, but instead a seething mass of modern wage-slaves being overworked without so much as a single defending voice. We lament the loss of some great camera shops (I'd say Jacob's, not Jessop's), and we lament the loss of jobs in sympathy with all those suddenly streeted by the closures. But at the same time we're cheerfully giving business to Amazon and other massive online warehousers who'd employ all that streeted staff (and thousands more) at less than half the wages, none of the benefits and under shocking working conditions. We must not dismiss the matter, because out of sight/out of mind is just not a good enough response from any of us. It was my response until information on the problem crossed my desk. Amazon and all the other online discounters who tap into the distribution/fulfillment warehousing operations are off my list, and I think they should be off everyone else's list too.

Support local, buy local as much as possible. The alternatives, for now, are terrible.

My Photo.Net Gallery
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Howard Carson

  

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richardd300 Silver Member Nikonian since 19th Apr 2009Tue 15-Jan-13 04:14 PM
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#37. "RE: Jessops goes into administration in the UK"
In response to Reply # 36


Dyserth, GB
          

We, as a family, support local and high street shops as much as we possibly can. However, if it were just the high street retailers who are bearing the brunt of the recession, there would be a trend. Last month Comet, the largest out of town retail electrical store collapsed, the biggest UK casualty of 2012. Many other out of town stores went in the preceding years. Those, who thought back in 2007 that this was a glitch and all would soon be well financially, were sadly living in a different world. Many of us more pragmatic followers of the retail and domestic trends were far more pessimistic and have sadly been proved correct. The UK situation is dire with no real solution in sight, I am sure this is mirrored in many other economies. HMV, had extended their New Year sale for a month to no avail and are being charged with, like others, as taking their eye off the internet sales situation.

Whatever the answer is and I am perhaps being cynical in thinking that the "retail experts" don't know, the government don't know and certainly Joe public don't know! But to quote Winston Churchill, he said "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty".

We can only support those most at risk, by being thoughtful where we spend our money.

<<Sam's was located on the Yonge Street tourist strip in Toronto, half a block from a tube station>>

I enjoyed a few good meals near there in JJ Muggs, guess it's closed now.

Richard

Richard

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OldCodger Registered since 15th Oct 2011Tue 15-Jan-13 05:18 PM
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#39. "RE: Jessops goes into administration in the UK"
In response to Reply # 37


Sawbridgeworth Hertfordshire, GB
          

Sadly, I had crafted a response to Howard's latest but an access problem lost the contribution...
I think the other Richard has said much of what I feel. 'Retail is detail' is the mantra, I feel that much of the retail management has been poor, overpaying on overheads, underpaying on staff and with no foresight. Woolworth, Comet, and a range of other big and small chains are no more, there must be something in the water.
Service is vital; saying you are reserving an item and selling it within two hours and 20 minutes before the customer arrives after a cross town journey is not service. However, it is the performance my daughter received from one local outlet.
I checked up what I own, until recently it was all bought face to face, only one body, (out of six) and one lens, (out of nearly 18) were bought on line, largely because I could not get to anyone who had the items within sensible travelling distance.
Getting into London by car would be mad, getting there by public transport is currently impossible due a range of issues. Cost being but one of them. Literally the cost would exceed half the cost of my recent lens purchase and take all day. Physically I would not be able to make the journey.
Due to other family health issues about 85% of my annual car mileage is dealing with relatives with health issues, I cannot afford the time to spend a day shopping, even if I had the mobility. However, I am never going to single handedly turn the fortunes of the retail industry. My point about parking and transport was that in the absence of either, which many do face, an almost hostile retail experience is not a motivator.
A large chain sold me a microwave and within two months it failed. The large employer of untrained extended warranty pushers was unable to do anything about the issue. A direct contact with the maker produced a courier pick up and a full refund of the purchase price. (I suspect that there was a design error in the product structure.)
The mobile telephone I was recently sent by my carrier has huge focus on the likes of digital music. I do not need that non-feature; I need one touch voice dialling. The phone does not 'do that', (neither does any other modern phone). It needs touches presses, swipes and a few more touches - I continue to use the 8 year old phone...
We now manage some of our 'access issues' by ordering groceries 'on line' rather than travelling to the same local supermarket. It gives someone a job, (though the motor trade might miss out on a bit of trade from me).
With full face performances like those, retail has a huge hill to climb, that, rather than worrying about digital down loads is the core of a serious management issue.
Still Howard is right, the present shake down will provide someone with a chance to make something new, for the moment that something appears to be the internet, but that may well be only the start and not the end of the story.

  

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agitater Gold Member Nikonian since 18th Jan 2007Tue 15-Jan-13 08:20 PM
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#42. "RE: Jessops goes into administration in the UK"
In response to Reply # 37


Toronto, CA
          

>I enjoyed a few good meals near there in JJ Muggs, guess it's
>closed now.

Still around - there are several of them now. The food has gone mainstream/chain though.

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jbloom Gold Member Awarded for the continuous and generous sharing of his high level expertise and his always encouraging comments in several forums. Nikonian since 15th Jul 2004Tue 15-Jan-13 05:07 PM
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#38. "RE: Jessops goes into administration in the UK"
In response to Reply # 36


Wethersfield, US
          

>Surely the access, in a shop, to a hands-on product experience
>and face-to-face discussion about a product while interacting
>with shop staff and shop customers (e.g., as Richard described
>it earlier), and the concomittant option to exchange a product
>over the counter or lodge a complaint directly with a
>shopkeeper trumps parking and public transit inconvenience.

Not for me, even when parking isn't a problem.. More often than not, I've found shop personnel having limited knowledge of the products, technology and practice of photography. Pushing whatever the shop needs to clear out of inventory is often their principal motive for recommending products. (It may well be different in a big-city store, of which I have little experience.)

While I can't get a hands-on look at the product I'm considering when I buy it on-line, I can get the benefit of a broad user community's experience. When it comes to photographic equipment, I can get far better advice here on Nikonians than I ever got in any shop.

As for returns and exchanges, I only do business with online merchants who process such things reliably. I don't have to go to a shop and argue with an owner, I just return the item to the seller, whose size allows the economy of scale necessary to build the cost of returns/exchanges into the business model.

> By
>comparison, participating in or being drawn in by the utterly
>(and by definition) impersonal online shopping experience is
>vapid - no sales help, too much reliance on so-called customer
>reviews of products (too many of which are simply false or
>deliberately planted), aggravation from having to go through
>the effort of shipping a defective product back to a supplier
>and hoping upon hope that it won't be lost in the shuffle),
>among other inconveniences.

You are dramatically overstating the problems. Having a return "lost in the shuffle," whatever that means, has never happened to me. On the other hand, getting push-back from a local shop on a return has happened to me. YMMV.

>We lament the loss of some great
>camera shops (I'd say Jacob's, not Jessop's), and we lament
>the loss of jobs in sympathy with all those suddenly streeted
>by the closures. But at the same time we're cheerfully giving
>business to Amazon and other massive online warehousers who'd
>employ all that streeted staff (and thousands more) at less
>than half the wages, none of the benefits and under shocking
>working conditions.

You have a much rosier view of the state of employment in brick-and-mortar shops than I. Here in the US, many employees of small businesses get no or ever-decreasing benefits, little job security and wages that are barely enough to get by on. Maybe the retail business is much better in Canada, although I tend to doubt it.

>Support local, buy local as much as possible. The
>alternatives, for now, are terrible.

I don't agree, but it really doesn't matter too much in my case with regard to photo equipment because the nearest "local" shop is so far away as to make going there impractical, anyway. Shops in big cities can survive; shops in smaller cites find it difficult. The places that seem to be really thriving are the ones that combine big-city brick-and-mortar with robust on-line sales, such as B&H and Adorama. I can call them and get every bit as much help on the phone as over the counter in a shop. If you want to know what the emerging successful retail photographic equipment business model is, look to them.

-- Jon
Wethersfield, CT, USA
Connecticut High School Sports Photos

  

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richardd300 Silver Member Nikonian since 19th Apr 2009Tue 15-Jan-13 06:41 PM
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#40. "RE: Jessops goes into administration in the UK"
In response to Reply # 38


Dyserth, GB
          

<<Not for me, even when parking isn't a problem.. More often than not, I've found shop personnel having limited knowledge of the products, technology and practice of photography.>>

Jessops abandoned part exchange a while ago and with it went many of the experienced staff who were able to grade and evaluate equipment. In came in the extras, like photo printing, pictures on mugs and tee shirts. However, the staff in my local branch were fairly knowledgeable, although I sometimes felt I probably had a better grasp than they did. Despite that I still had an opportunity to test the goods.

When I bought my D800 from London Camera Exchange (choice between Jessops and LCE) I was able to take along my 50mm f1.8 lens and test left, right, top and bottom focusing. Couldn't have done that via the web

Richard

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agitater Gold Member Nikonian since 18th Jan 2007Tue 15-Jan-13 08:13 PM
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#41. "RE: Jessops goes into administration in the UK"
In response to Reply # 38


Toronto, CA
          


>The places that seem to be
>really thriving are the ones that combine big-city
>brick-and-mortar with robust on-line sales, such as B&H
>and Adorama. I can call them and get every bit as much help on
>the phone as over the counter in a shop. If you want to know
>what the emerging successful retail photographic equipment
>business model is, look to them.

I agree - in part - but the B&H model is in flux. Same goes for Adorama and Calumet, among others. I think such successful retailers emerged a number of years ago as they restructured their existing brick & mortar operations and traditional mail order/catalog operations that were showing signs of stress. That was the wisdom - to recognize early on that change was needed in order to remain viable and profitable. Other successful models will emerge.

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richardd300 Silver Member Nikonian since 19th Apr 2009Tue 15-Jan-13 09:03 PM
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#43. "RE: Jessops goes into administration in the UK"
In response to Reply # 41


Dyserth, GB
          

<<Same goes for Adorama and Calumet, among others>>

Yes, unfortunately Calumet's Liverpool branch closed about 18 months ago.

Richard

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agitater Gold Member Nikonian since 18th Jan 2007Wed 16-Jan-13 11:54 AM
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#44. "RE: Jessops goes into administration in the UK"
In response to Reply # 43


Toronto, CA
          

><<Same goes for Adorama and Calumet, among
>others>>
>
>Yes, unfortunately Calumet's Liverpool branch closed about 18
>months ago.

I wonder about Calumet and its broad-based operations, especially in the U.S. The Calumet people in London (Wardour Street) helped me out with a technical service problem in 2004, and I've done a bit of business with that location in the intervening years. Don't know how the U.S.-basd Calumet is doing. I think there are at least 6 other Calumet locations in England, Scotland and Ireland. I wonder which location is next on the chopping block.

In Canada, I'm going to start seeing the effects of minor recession soon. I'll be watching the main, national photography gear retailers very closely throughout 2013 and 2014 for signs of stress. I'll also be watching for the ways in which the major independent shops deal with recession.

One of the privately owned marques in Canada is in the process of closing right now - Mostly Digital, located in London, Ontario. The owner drove other camera retailers absolutely crazy because he was always undercutting everyone through his online operation (if not his brick & mortar operation), so consumers were for several years regularly walking up to store counters, pointing Mostly Digital's online price for something and demanding a price match. I suspect that left for Mostly Digital the kind of razor thin margins that can't maintain cash flow when sales volumes decrease the way they have (ever so slowly here) over the past 18 months or so. There will be more failures like this I'm sure.

I'm keeping my eye on Henry's here as well. It's a very Jessop's-like national chain, albeit with a pervasive professional element as well and a much higher percentage of photograph enthusiasts and video enthusiasts on staff than Jessop's. I don't doubt for a moment that Henry's generally smart management will shutter any marginal operations that crop up. Same goes for Vistek, which used to be an almost strictly pro shop, but which has over the past 5-10 years evolved into a wide service operation with several stores and a strong online presence. Then again, Henry's apparently isn't locked into screwball premises leases which bind it to locations that stop performing. The leases aren't fully open-ended - few landlords are that dumb - but I think Henry's has planned for a certain level of difficulties in that regard. There are many others.

When economic good times are rolling, retailers often expand. When the good times cease, it's inconcievable that those same operations can stand as they are. Corporate chain retailers and private retailers who are either unprepared for the downturn (or owners who are fed up enough and tired enough to not be up for yet another economic battle) are going to close.

Manufacturers' profits (and margins) are up in many sectors of our economies, the related problem being that a lot of those profits have come through the employment and use of cheaper labour. At the same time, just as many retail sectors have become marginal or wholly unprofitable. Economies built on the willingness and financial abilities of people to buy more and more and more, ad infinitum, can't represent a future on which we can build. It's going to be interesting to see if business developers can come up with a retail model which is fully sustainable and which satisfies the needs discussed in this thread - hands-on product tryout experiences, competitive pricing structures (without any form of price fixing), timely availability of customers' selected products, and so on.

Everybody can't live in the big cities, with all the outlets and services close by. That has been amply pointed out in this thread. For those that don't live in major centres, satisfying their retail product buying needs through traditional shops is going to be a much greater challenge than ever before given the cost and absent profits inherent in our current slow-growth or contracting economies. So I wonder if the online buying models we have now will continue to evolve to satisfy those consumers. I suspect it has to happen because now and in the future they'll be a force to reckon with especially as the average age of western populations rises predictably and the increasing older segment becomes less mobile.

It occurs to me to suggest that maybe a lot of people for whom retail shopping has become unsatisfying in some respects, will increasingly decide to simply stick with the advanced photographer gear they've already got and simply use it to best purposes. If manufacturers and retailers together thought that planned obsolescence could be a gravy train that would never end, they're getting a hard lesson right now. We're in the midst of yet another economic mess which clearly shows that people can and will stop buying sometimes, opting for better and more extensive application of existing gear.

I don't think it will get better any time soon in North America. The U.S. congress is facing a credit crunch in about 60 days - the acrimonious debate about whether or not to raise the federal debt ceiling (the U.S. government has already bumped its head on something slightly north of 14 trillion dollars, with an acompanying deficit of a little over 1 trillion dollars. Is the U.S. too big to fail? Is this monster-scary debt something which will pass as economic drivers reassert themselves? Will the U.S. and its western relations (including Canada) finally stop living beyond their means? Will individual citizens carrying a higher per capita household debt load than ever before in history start finding ways to reduce that debt in the short term? That last bit certainly makes more sense than yearning for yet another shiny piece of glass and plastic.

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jbloom Gold Member Awarded for the continuous and generous sharing of his high level expertise and his always encouraging comments in several forums. Nikonian since 15th Jul 2004Wed 16-Jan-13 01:25 PM
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#45. "RE: Jessops goes into administration in the UK"
In response to Reply # 44


Wethersfield, US
          

I think the photo business is suffering from several converging curves. On the local level, the ability of the Amazons and other large online retailers to squeeze costs out of the distribution system have pushed many local retailers to the wall. (And yes, I realize there are certain social costs to that, but as a society we are more sensitive to economic costs than social ones, right or wrong.) I don't see that changing much unless some unknown factor increases their costs unexpectedly.

At the same time, there has been a general economic slow-down.

But what is true of the photo business that isn't true of many others is that the technology curve has flattened. During the middle and latter part of the last decade, there were rapid advances in digital photography technology, especially in sensor performance. That encouraged a lot of people to upgrade -- multiple times in many cases. But the improvements are now more incremental than fundamental. Many who have a 12-megapixel camera, for example, see little need to move to a 16-, 24- or 36-megapixel camera whose basic image quality isn't THAT much better that what they already have. Granted, there will always be those chasing the "bleeding edge," but even many of them will slow their upgrade cycle as the benefit of upgrading diminishes.

Of course, these trends act to decrease prices in order to enhance demand, so we can all take a certain amount of selfish glee in that.

-- Jon
Wethersfield, CT, USA
Connecticut High School Sports Photos

  

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richardd300 Silver Member Nikonian since 19th Apr 2009Wed 16-Jan-13 05:42 PM
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#46. "RE: Jessops goes into administration in the UK"
In response to Reply # 45


Dyserth, GB
          

It's not been a great 2013 to date. This afternoon "Blockbuster" the UK shop and online DVD film hire company went into administration with the loss, if a buyer isn't found, of 4000 employees. So, in the last months that's 3 companies adding a possible 10,000+ to the unemployed register.

Richard

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OldCodger Registered since 15th Oct 2011Wed 16-Jan-13 06:06 PM
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#47. "RE: Jessops goes into administration in the UK"
In response to Reply # 46


Sawbridgeworth Hertfordshire, GB
          

Yes it has not been a good start to 2013, I fear it may yet get worse.
I do feel that the retail plain is being cleared out one way or another mainly removing the almost dead. I do not know about you but I do not think I have ever hired a video or DVD for myself and now that the children are no longer children, I do not hire for them either. With TV viewing dropping like the proverbial stone in free space, it is no surprise to me that there are consequences. I am not sure where the nearest Blockbuster branch is but the two adjacent towns appear to have one each.
It is still sad for those who had a job one minute and now might have nothing. Their web site is still active so perhaps something might still happen.

  

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richardd300 Silver Member Nikonian since 19th Apr 2009Wed 16-Jan-13 08:18 PM
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#48. "RE: Jessops goes into administration in the UK"
In response to Reply # 47


Dyserth, GB
          

I agree and haven't hired a DVD for about 20 years, ok it was probably VHS! That is what many experts are saying in that all these companies have not responded in time to the web sales and other technology now used. I think a good example of rethinking was the Kindle. Although libraries are at threat they are responding in other ways. The Kindle has enabled a whole new generation to take an interest in reading books.

However, where we go from here is a difficult question, but do agree that retail is "removing the dead", so what's left must respond and quickly.

Richard

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OldCodger Registered since 15th Oct 2011Thu 17-Jan-13 08:23 AM
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#49. "RE: Jessops goes into administration in the UK"
In response to Reply # 48


Sawbridgeworth Hertfordshire, GB
          

This is in danger of becoming a bit too UK centric, but I suspect that the problems are not generally UK specific.
I do worry that one major issue is the high level of both commercial property prices and business taxes which conspired to damage many of our retail propositions. Perhaps some of the major large stores, which mainly means supermarkets should consider renting spaces by the day for pop up shops, so that specialists could attend on a rota basis, Monday the photo-store, Tuesday the Police drop in centre, Wednesday the..., etc. Effectively something like the office space rental model run successfully by several companies.

  

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richardd300 Silver Member Nikonian since 19th Apr 2009Fri 25-Jan-13 12:47 PM
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#50. "Jessops - Could a phoenix rise from the ashes?"
In response to Reply # 49


Dyserth, GB
          

An interesting article published today may give some hope to Jessops. Sadly though, not for the folks who manned the shops!

http://www.amateurphotographer.co.uk/photo-news/539412/jessops-brand-and-online-business-may-survive-update-friday?utm_source=cheetah&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=25Jan13&ap

Richard

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OldCodger Registered since 15th Oct 2011Fri 25-Jan-13 03:14 PM
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#51. "RE: Jessops - Could a phoenix rise from the ashes?"
In response to Reply # 50


Sawbridgeworth Hertfordshire, GB
          

Yes I have seen that talk, it aligns rather well with the idea I put forward above, in essence shop sharing. Or, to coin a phrase, 'Department Stores' or has that one been used before?
I rather liked the system they used in Japan, you could buy things in the store and rather than carry them out with you on crowded trains and buses have them delivered when you are already home again. Most of the big department stores ran this system. It is one way of hiding the on site stock position, no use for the 'I need it NOW situation' but it could work for a significant number of other trade situations - if the delivery is on time and all correct.

  

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richardd300 Silver Member Nikonian since 19th Apr 2009Fri 25-Jan-13 03:19 PM
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#52. "RE: Jessops - Could a phoenix rise from the ashes?"
In response to Reply # 51


Dyserth, GB
          

It was also interesting that HMV shops (now under administration) may stock Jessops brand items.

Richard

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agitater Gold Member Nikonian since 18th Jan 2007Sat 26-Jan-13 02:43 AM
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#53. "RE: Jessops - Could a phoenix rise from the ashes?"
In response to Reply # 52


Toronto, CA
          

I think these sorts of suggestions, proposals, machinations, stock tranfers-on-spec, and other schemes that are floated by industry pundits pop up during every administration, chapter 11 and bankruptcy avoidance attempt presided over by Deliotte, D&B, PwC and a variety of other mega-trustees. It's a way of showing unsecured creditors some due diligence. Happens every time. The reality is that the primary secured creditors are usually the various government tax departments to which sales taxes/VAT are owed and which are usually, by law, first in line for the cash pickings immediately after the bankruptcy trustee itself - in this case PwC - which gets its fee before anyone). The vast majority of unsecured creditors - read: most product suppliers and product distributors - are unsecured, and usually get back only unbilled inventory (and only then if the supplier sends its own trucks to pick up the goods because neither PwC nor any other trustee or arbitrator will spend so much as a rusty penny on transport unless it is to haul goods to a warehouse for auction). Much ado, for PR purposes, about nothing.

As usual, they're just rearranging deck chairs on the Titanic.

Whatever employees have been retained to assist PwC are wise to be pounding the high streets at every available moment looking for new positions like all their sacked former fellow employees are mostly already doing. PwC will dump whomever remains the moment the stores are emptied and the auctions are underway. If I was in the UK at the same time as the auction (next week?), I'd be bidding on job lots myself. Goods going at 10-15p to the pound after landing FOB Toronto are not to be passed up and it wouldn't be the first time I've done it. Look for reps from Argos, London Camera Exchange, PC World, Sunrise Digital and many other buyers from small private shops, chains and high street shops alike at the auction(s) to pick the Jessop's carcass clean.

Very shortly, every camera shop in the UK is going to have stacks of Lenspen packages on sale for 3 quid a throw. Same goes for rack upon rack of heavily discounted Domke and Lowepro camera straps, bins full of cheap Tiffen filters. Over the next few months too, all the shops who scooped stuff at the auction will be giving away two, slowpoke 8GB SD cards with every camera purchase instead of one.

I think the Jessop's brand as it's associated with volume retail tech and imaging products has some residual value. But whatever other company spends money to acquire the brand name had better capitalize on it quickly because that sort of brand after a shuttering has a shelf life of about ten whole seconds, after which the brand isn't worth much more than a leaky rowboat.

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dickiederson Registered since 09th May 2009Sun 27-Jan-13 09:09 PM
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#54. "RE: Jessops - Could a phoenix rise from the ashes?"
In response to Reply # 53
Sun 27-Jan-13 09:14 PM by dickiederson

San Francisco, US
          

It's kind of sad and horrible for anyone involved. But I also think its an evolution. Just like from 15 years ago when there was always at least one decent camera shop in every town (there was 3 in my small hometown of Leamington Spa, you could walk to each one and press your nose against the glass to see all the pre-owned goodies!). There was also usually a charming record store and video rental store, staffed with enthusiastic human beings!

And then along came Jessops, HMV, and Blockbuster and sat on all the independent shops until they suffocated. Jessops have been pretty #### for years, be honest... A sterile, shiny room full of nothing in particular except air. HMV was quite a good place for DVDs and CDs, but they're getting old fashioned now...

And as for Blockbuster.... Good riddance!! I was once denied credit for some unknown reason, when I looked into it the reason was a £1.13 late return fee (remember them?!) from Blockbuster from about 2 years previous. Bastards.


Haha And Another Thing while I'm on my High Horse...!

The UK case been known as 'Rip Off Britain' for years, partly because of our hideous taxes to pay for our Welfare Estates but also because massive chains have been fixing their prices. The internet has levelled the playing field and now those companies are dying after years of gorging themselves stupid.

I feel a bit better now...

www.shootingheadz.com

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richardd300 Silver Member Nikonian since 19th Apr 2009Mon 28-Jan-13 07:26 AM
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#55. "RE: Jessops - Could a phoenix rise from the ashes?"
In response to Reply # 54


Dyserth, GB
          

<<The UK case been known as 'Rip Off Britain' for years, partly because of our hideous taxes to pay for our Welfare Estates but also because massive chains have been fixing their prices. The internet has levelled the playing field and now those companies are dying after years of gorging themselves stupid.>>

Yes and one reason the UK is incapable of moving forward is that tags like "Rip off Britain" just helps to sap the resolve and confidence of its residents!

I don't quite understand what "Welfare Estates" refers to. If you mean Welfare benefits, then that's got little to do with the state of the UK high streets although the doom and gloom merchants within many very dubious UK tabloid newspapers enjoy making some very tenuous connections.

Richard

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OldCodger Registered since 15th Oct 2011Mon 28-Jan-13 08:12 AM
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#56. "RE: Jessops - Could a phoenix rise from the ashes?"
In response to Reply # 55


Sawbridgeworth Hertfordshire, GB
          

I am concerned that this debate could be, (and is in danger of becoming) more political than a review of the commercial forces affecting our hobby/professions. It is certainly true that each country has its own structural issues that give rise to its own unique business problems and solutions. One thing that most can agree on is the issue of business change and the mistakes that are often made in either (a) not pursuing change fast enough, (b) not identifying the right direction of change or (c) not testing and thinking through the business model to follow. These are not the same as the issues of simply structuring your business to work in the first place.
Tax rates are an issue, property prices are an issue, wise business people recognise these business issues and model around all of the 'issues'. That is basic sense.
what is in play is the effect of other softer issues, trade volume, market needs, available customer cash flow, customer access and motivation, etc. Simply throwing ever lower paid unskilled staff against an issue is not a solution to anything, yet this is a favoured option of too many in too many markets. This as much as anything results in bad sales and the smell of rip off as the miss-selling scandals are now showing.

  

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richardd300 Silver Member Nikonian since 19th Apr 2009Mon 28-Jan-13 10:07 AM
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#57. "RE: Jessops - Could a phoenix rise from the ashes?"
In response to Reply # 56


Dyserth, GB
          

<<I am concerned that this debate could be, (and is in danger of becoming) more political than a review of the commercial forces affecting our hobby/professions.>>

Not sure I agree with that as it does impinge on our hobbies and numerous other day to day issues. My reasoning is that of public perception and the effects on why a prospective buyer may purchase a product. I think that manipulated and hyped up media reports may have a major effect on peoples buying mentality for those who could afford to do so. This is further compounded by the banks refusing to lend money to businesses, therefore they cannot grow. There's nothing political in this thinking, it's all about the way folks are manipulated on a daily basis through media exposure.

That said however, one has to remember that a large chunk of those who would have been the prospective purchasers in the past are now unable to invest in hobbies or much else for that matter

Richard

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OldCodger Registered since 15th Oct 2011Mon 28-Jan-13 01:36 PM
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#58. "RE: Jessops - Could a phoenix rise from the ashes?"
In response to Reply # 57


Sawbridgeworth Hertfordshire, GB
          

OK let me come off of a fence and state how the butter goes on the bread for me. I am retired and living on pension. I saved like hell when working and paid in anything I could into my pension fund up to the limits set by the tax authorities. So now I am moderately comfortable. I can certainly afford to buy more than I do and, to be blunt I have no need of 'public perception' to guide my purchasing.
I fear you have not read the entirety of my post. I sought to get behind why shops and chains may and do fail. I suggest that it is simply down to getting the business wrong.
Governments trying to hold dying business on life support for too long costs a fortune and never works. Ship building, mining and even steel making died/ are dying here because the world moved on. Certainly physical limits on our once proficient ships yards ensured that they could not be brought into the modern world, the old riveter yards could not produce modern welded ships due to their cramped space, put simply they were in the wrong place.
We brought in shed loads of cheap labour to do jobs in other dying industries, spinning and weaving for example and now those unskilled and semi skilled people who were duped into coming, are in large measure disaffected and living on welfare. Employing people on what amounts to state aid to do things that should not even be done, is not a forward looking recipe. Having the management understanding to know what needs to be done and the gumption to do it is another thing. Sadly there are far too many who lack such management skill, understanding or interest. Probably because it take hard work, carries risks and is not an easy option. Getting things right is hard, letting failures fail can be uncomfortable. Sadly few politicians understand this reality. They would rather bail out the failures and allow fat fingers to dip into the pork barrel of short term gains. We all suffer. I have tried to avoid too much 'local politics' in this mild rant to be as inclusive as possible. I stand by the idea that a dearth of management skill and long termism rather than the current obsession with short termism is the root cause of many of our problems. The internet is not helping with this problem. Any move to change direction with a plan length of more than a sunny afternoon will yield such a raft of objectors that nothing will ever get done. Sadly the objectors only skill is in objecting, they have never usually achieved anything in their boring lives anyway.
Returning for a moment to matters closer to home, yes I would like to buy several things, I was even in a car park this morning less than 200 yards from the one remaining camera shop within travelling distance from my home. I even set out to walk there but the effects of waiting to be diagnosed and then gain medical treatment meant that I had to give up and shuffle back to the car, sit and wait for the others to return. This is not a stab at the present government, my trouble started in 2001 only half a year back was it finally diagnosed and found to be treatable, perhaps.
I must now stop before I fill the site with unhappy mind dumping.
Richard

  

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agitater Gold Member Nikonian since 18th Jan 2007Mon 28-Jan-13 01:47 PM
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#59. "RE: Jessops - Could a phoenix rise from the ashes?"
In response to Reply # 57


Toronto, CA
          


>That said however, one has to remember that a large chunk of
>those who would have been the prospective purchasers in the
>past are now unable to invest in hobbies or much else for that
>matter

Well said Richard, but that's not the half of it and, bad as it is, it is by no means the worst aspect.

In a global economic environment and infrastructure which depends, at its foundation, on more and more people buying more and more goods of all kinds, the slightest breach of continuity causes failures, layoffs and recession. Even our cherished Nikon borrows to sustain the ever increasing frequency of new product releases (although anyone waiting solely for a D300s successor might argue about that - at least briefly). And even if it could be demonstrated that Nikon alone has not significantly increased the pace of its new releases (although, taking into account the awful setbacks imposed by a succession of natural disasters in Japan and Thailand, it certainly has), there are as many competing players as ever, each of which is producing more new products, annually, than ever before and shipping greater volumes than ever before (recession be damned in many respects). So when the marketing and business and economics mavens pool their collective brain cells to come up with sustainable business planning, does anyone in this thread think that those mavens don't talk about the possibilities of shop closures, administration, bankruptcy protection, selloff of business units, layoff scheduling and so on? They certainly do. I get the memos and I sit in some of the meetings.

My point is that the high tech photography business - design, supply chain, manufacturing, distribution, retail, all of it - is as sensitive to the slightest downturn in consumer purchasing power as any other business to which we can point.

The seemingly (for too many) endless recession has a solution. It has to be a massive reset of our thinking, our wants and desires, and the manner in which retail marketing and retail economics psychologically attempts to advantage itself while attempting to disadvantage all prospective consumers. There will have to be some degree of reset in goods sourcing as well. Western business planning and theories fall apart, to some extent, during recession. But if a recession goes on long enough, greater and greater percentages of people in different regions around the world will get used to making do with the cameras and lenses they already own. Now wouldn't that be a revelation for so many photographers pointlessly hell-bent on improving their photography by spending hard-earned money on yet another camera body or lens (or both).

I don't claim to be immune to the blandishments of relentless marketing driven by smart companies probing the psychological chinks evident in the flawed budget armour worn by so many of us.

It's happening in all markets. Fine, mechanical wristwatches have become so overpriced (listen to the echoing babble about the strength of the Swiss France against the euro, CDN dollar, U.S. dollar, UK pound, etc., etc.) that even mundane calibres are now at retail out of the reach of a huge percentage of former buyers. Recession is recession you might say, but you'd be wrong because many of the major Swiss, French and German luxury watch makers have all posted higher profits and higher net earnings. Instead of shipping and selling 40% of everything they make to the U.S., Switzerland is now shipping only 10% to the U.S., but 30% to China. and the Chinese market is growing (and jolly good, I suppose, for all the new millionaires and billionaires in the Pacific rim).

Where does all that wealth come from in China, India and other pockets in Asia? A lot of it comes from manufacturing things that we used to manufacture ourselves. The western democracies have deliberately made themselves over into net consumers of goods, rather than net producers of goods. Instead of striking a balance between consumption of goods and manufacturing of goods, the western nations have given away their clout in a quest for ever-cheaper jeans, cameras, lenses, iPods, laptops, tablets, toaster-ovens and you-name-it. When a nation stops producing goods in sufficient variety and volume to sustain a significant percentage of the needs and requirements of a modern populace, then that nation has effectively sold its birthright to the lowest bidder.

In the most recent polling in England, Canada and the U.S., a broad swath of consumers said that they'd rather pay a fiver for a China-made product than a tenner for a domestic-made product of slightly higher quality. There's a lot more to the polling/research than that simplisitic excerpt, but the gist of the latest research boils down to our heavily conditioned desires to buy cheap (even when many originating manufacturing markets to this day make use of horrible labour practices and brutal working conditions), convince ourselves that cheaper is just as good (even when it is demonstrably not so, and even in the face of Stephen Colbert screaming mockingly "I want my 12 pair of tube sport socks for $3.88" - or whatever the satirical quote was when he was slamming the economic depredations of a Walmart retail world), and allow ourselves to fall prey to the blandishments of cunning marketers who would have us shelve a perfectly good lens (with which we haven't yet spent near enough time to develop true expertise) in favour of yet another lens that we also may not ever use often enough to develop true expertise.

The astonishingly busy western high streets that we've seen evolve over the past 60 years were never sustainable in a world where most of the goods on the shelves of the stores in those high streets were increasingly produced very far away in China and India in places where the manufacturing workers can't reciprocate by going into their own high streets and purchasing goods produced by westerners. Without reciprocation - without balance - we can whine, mewl and howl about the losses of jobs, and oh how poor the staff treated us, and oh how the great family operated camera shops were so much better back in the day, and oh how there are so few of the good shops left, all as we surf Argos, Amazon, PC World, BestBuy.com, bog-box-store disounters, Costco, and the online discount retailers (fed by massive warehousing operations that employ seething labour pools working in terrible circumstances), and all the while complaining (well some us of us at least) that we ended up with a short warranty or a grey market item or a messed up delivery or some other aggravation. I mean, what did anyone expect would happen? That there wouldn't be any effect? That we could quest eternally for more stuff at prices far cheaper than we can now make any of it for ourselves in our own countries, and that there wouldn't be any consequences?

In Canada, we've lost just as much domestic manufacturing of photography-related gear as has been lost in any other western nation. Camera carry systems, POD bean bags, some machine tools, etc. - that's what we make now. Clothing manufacturing? We used to be huge clothing manufacturers, but now, like the U.S., we're 95% importers of clothing. Only 5% of the clothing sold in North American retail stores is actually made in North America. Europe is not much different. We're pathetic. The Triangle Shirtwaist factory fire (1911), the unions fighting for better working conditions, the expense of building or remodeling safe factory facilities, and all the lessons we learned in North America and Europe about how to design and manufacture good and great products (and plenty of cheap ones too) is all cheefully ignored as soon as hit the Web or cross the threshold walking into Ritz, PC World, Curry's, Best Buy, Future Shop, FNAC, etc., etc., etc., or Walmart, Costco, Sam's Club, etc., etc., etc. In Canada, instead of manufacturing so much of what we used to buy in our stores, we now import most of it but sell our oil to buyers in China and India who need it to power their own factories.

Don't pine for the loss of jobs at the shuttered Jessop's. Don't pine for weakened retail economics. Worry instead about a global economic environment that is unsustainable if we're to build a world that is balanced and full of opportunity for our children and grandchildren and future generations.

I can hardly wait for the millions of Chinese and Indian workers (skilled and unskilled alike) to start rising up, en masse, just as workers began to do in North America and Europe during the early part of the 20th century. I hope it happens soon. No more 12 pairs of lousy tube sports socks for $3.88 at Walmart. Sooner or later, all those teeming hordes of workers in China and India are going to get fed up with their lot as indentured slaves. And that's when the big reset will most likely take place.

Another bunch of Indian clothing factory workers just died in a factory fire, in part, because of yet another locked/chained emergency exit. About 600 clothing factory workers have died, in total, in similar circumstances over the past few years. Life is cheap when you're making dresses for Target. Chinese factory workers in all segments are revolting here and there at various factories on the mainland. Who knows how long the Chinese factories can keep the lid on things. All I know for sure is that we can't maintain order and civility and plan for the future when the tools we need to do such things are mostly made elsewhere.

Big changes and the accompanying hardship can't be far off. It will be interesting times for those of us who are prepared. Draining the family budget for photography gear is probably a poor way to prepare though. All the foregoing could have been written even more confidently if I was actually in possession of a crystal ball (at least one that works; the one I've got right now is murky). Furthermore, even though I've also had a time machine sitting in my garage for years, I just can't get the stupid thing to work. I've got to find the guy who sold me the thing and get my money back.

Richard - I am telling you here again that I predicted in the aftermath of the disaster in Japan and Thailand that Nikon would not have a successor for the D300s until April or May of 2013. I'm sticking with that prediction. HOWEVER, just in case I'm dead wrong (which I'm not - ahem), if Nikon fails to produce the predicted body by the end of May I will buy you dinner at the restaurant of your choice (and please, go easy on the choice).

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Howard Carson

  

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richardd300 Silver Member Nikonian since 19th Apr 2009Mon 28-Jan-13 03:34 PM
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#60. "RE: Jessops - Could a phoenix rise from the ashes?"
In response to Reply # 59


Dyserth, GB
          

<<OK let me come off of a fence and state how the butter goes on the bread for me. I am retired and living on pension. I saved like hell when working and paid in anything I could into my pension fund up to the limits set by the tax authorities. So now I am moderately comfortable. I can certainly afford to buy more than I do and, to be blunt I have no need of 'public perception' to guide my purchasing. >>

Me too and aren't we the lucky ones

<<Richard - I am telling you here again that I predicted in the aftermath of the disaster in Japan and Thailand that Nikon would not have a successor for the D300s until April or May of 2013. I'm sticking with that prediction. HOWEVER, just in case I'm dead wrong (which I'm not - ahem), if Nikon fails to produce the predicted body by the end of May I will buy you dinner at the restaurant of your choice (and please, go easy on the choice)>>.

JJ Muggs will be fine, I'll pay the air fare

Richard

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avm247 Moderator Awarded for high skills in documentary architecture and aviation photography Charter MemberMon 28-Jan-13 03:50 PM
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#61. "This thread has taken an decidedly political slant."
In response to Reply # 0


Rancho Cordova, US
          

Thank you all for participating but this thread has moved off topic and will now be closed.

Thank you for understanding.


Anthony

The Moderator Page and My Gallery
The important things in life are simple; the simple things are hard.

  

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