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Subject: "Has altered reality become the new realism?" Previous topic | Next topic
spiritualized67 Silver Member Nikonian since 01st Mar 2007Wed 02-Jan-13 09:16 PM
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"Has altered reality become the new realism?"


Western PA, US
          

I’ve dabbled in both HDR and infrared, so I understand the lure of creating alternative realities – although I’ll always prefer photos that were the result of patience, persistence - and the photographer’s mastery of compelling light, good design and fleeting moments.

I’ve hung around pros who are purists when it comes to achieving as much realism in their photos as possible; the same artists who believe that you shouldn’t create any reality that wasn’t originally there in the first place.

But on the same token, I’ve come to respect all visions – even those that cross over into the surreal.

Of course, "respect" is entirely contingent on the idea that behind every post processing technique or methodology, that a photo should be able to stand on its own; that the technique or methodology shouldn’t be a surrogate for compelling subject matter.

While not a complete purist myself, I do believe post processing should complement and reinforce an existing reality – and I’ll always place a higher value on photographers who understand how to create emotionally powerful photos at the time of capture.

I know this subject has come up on Nikonians numerous times throughout the years, and I’m not necessarily trying to rehash the debate on altered reality versus realism – as everyone is entitled to his or her vision and style, and who are we to question this?

Rather, I’d just like to ponder how societal views seem to be changing based on the hyper-fast multi-media culture we find ourselves in; a culture with a seemingly voracious and endless appetite for altered reality - being fueled by the Internet, media, movies, smart phones, photography apps, etc.

Just today, I viewed a photo essay on CNN.com that was linking to some color infrared images, that in my opinion, were average at best (especially when you strip away the technique).

Another case in point is the mass adoption and prevalence of iDevice photography apps – whose sole purpose it seems, would be to doctor a photo to the point where the lines between reality and fantasy are blurred.

Photo-enabled smart phones, DSLRs and high-quality P&S cameras are everywhere – and I can’t think of any other time in modern history where photography has enjoyed such strong popularity and accessibility. This is a fact that should be celebrated.

But I can’t help but wonder in this age of Instagram and Hipstamatic, where millions of doctored photos are being uploaded daily and are becoming part of the collective…whether fantasy and surrealism is becoming the new realism?

Generally speaking, are we getting to the point where normal photos will soon be considered boring? At least from what I’m seeing, the younger generation (who are growing up in this Internet-enabled, sensory-driven mobile world) are being weaned on the technology (and the output of such technology).

Yes, I sound like an old dog – and maybe there’s some truth to that. But I feel a major paradigm shift taking place – something more than just a passing fancy for cool new post processing techniques.

So I ask, has fantasy and surrealism become the new realism?

~Dan
www.danielstainer.com

  

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quenton8 Silver Member
02nd Jan 2013
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spiritualized67 Silver Member
03rd Jan 2013
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archivue Gold Member
03rd Jan 2013
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walkerr Administrator
03rd Jan 2013
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HBB Moderator
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spiritualized67 Silver Member
04th Jan 2013
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GiantTristan Silver Member
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quenton8 Silver Member Awarded for bringing his experience to the Nikonians community helping members with printing and the use of post-processing software from the perspective of an IT professional. Nikonian since 11th Apr 2010Wed 02-Jan-13 09:40 PM
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#1. "RE: Has altered reality become the new realism?"
In response to Reply # 0


Toronto, CA
          

I suspect there are degrees of "changing a photograph", just as there are levels of photography ...

What I mean by levels of photography ...

  • I suspect there a good number of cheap point-and-shooters who make good or even great photographs, I suspect the majority don't get it.
  • I suspect even fewer take even good photos with smart-phones
  • But smart-phone photographers (I get to deal with them at our Church where I am in charge of posting photos) don't get that an out-of-focus, grainy, too-far-away and washed out photo is "not a good photo"
  • interesting to note that people at our church who want to buy one of the posted photos pick mine taken with a Nikon D90 and processed to get the best result
  • I think, and my wife agrees, that good photos will always be of interest and value


As to "post processing" (Changing) ..
  • I think some post processing is needed in many (most?) cases
  • I will personally go with more than that, and do pixel editing
  • Just recently I photographed our home with christmas lights on, but did not notice a bright light in one bedroom window (two symmetrical windows) - so I copied the darker one to the bright one -- that was major but did it change reality? I could have re-taken the photo if I had waited for the next evening.
  • I don't even mind things like "posterization", "B&W", "Sepia" -- are those surreal? I don't think so
  • Not sure how far one has to go to get a "new reality" -- but I DO know I would not like it.
  • All that said, I get into great arguments about what is art and what is not, with my brother-in-law who is a graphic artist


So -- I love photography and would not want to see what I consider "mainline" go away!!!

----
Dennis Smith.

  

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spiritualized67 Silver Member Nikonian since 01st Mar 2007Thu 03-Jan-13 12:57 PM
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#2. "RE: Has altered reality become the new realism?"
In response to Reply # 1


Western PA, US
          

Thanks for commenting, Dennis.

I do agree that good photos will always be of interest and value, and I also agree that post processing is needed in many/most cases, even if it's just a simple crop and contrast adjustment.

But it seems as though just about every photo taken and processed through smart phones and photo apps has extreme filters applied.

While many photo sites like Flickr still contain what we'd consider to be normal DSLR images, I'm starting to see a sea change in the quantity of doctored images derived from smart phones, such as the iPhone or Android. I can see the industry changing to cater to these mobile users. Just look at the recent purchase of Nik by Google, who from what I understand, is looking to somewhat re-purpose their Instagram-like app "Snapseed" using Nik functionality.

Like any other cultural phenomenon based on mass adoption, a new normal is starting to form. If this new normal is predicated on images that are overly processed, then I believe perceptions about what is or is not a good photo will change - which is not to say that people won't still value photos that are foundationally good. I feel we are getting to the point where the post-processed applied effects ARE becoming more important to our overall appreciation of images. In essence, they ARE becoming the subject.

As mobile technology starts becoming even more prevalent in our daily lives than it already is, I do believe that there will be more reliance on post processing trickery in order to create realities that weren't there in the first place - because this is what mobile users want.

~Dan

  

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archivue Gold Member Nikonian since 26th Mar 2002Thu 03-Jan-13 03:37 PM
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#3. "RE: Has altered reality become the new realism?"
In response to Reply # 2


Paris, FR
          

I'm not so sure it's a "new normality" sort of thing. A trend surely
In our post-modern society, one's "has" to have his "15 minutes of fame", whatever the media, and most of our "new" communities' tools are mostly image based.
As with the older paint tags on walls, duplication "ad nauseam" of some memes is like kitsch to art, a sort of beginning point.
It's more about transformation (metamorphosis) then about being an "author", mixing data, as some sort of picture DJ, and see what works...!

Who really care about realism in a virtualized society ? Andy Warhol started the game in some way, taking pictures that weren't his, applying a filter (paint) and selling them at a good price point!
What could have been a criticism of art, became perversely the new trend that gained momentum with electronic medias. It's not anymore about "taking a picture", it's more about how one can modify it to relate with others.

Imagination, curiosity, craft, has shifted. Before we wanted to be engineers, spacemen, admirals (whatever), our industry took ore and changed it in steel... Today we recycle, we see "in betweens" earning a fortune, we devise small "apps" that add up in some sort of kaleidoscopic tablet ! It seems quite logical that people would "recycle" and "transform" pictures
Still, I feel it's just a ford in the river, just about getting your feet wet. Most, after a while, discover art, start studying techniques, get the "real McCoy", and even get back to film and wet lab, with a new perspective, just as when photographers and painters quarreled on people portraits...

My two french philosopher's cents...

Jacques

"Un photographe, finalement, c'est quelqu'un comme les autres, mais qui prend des photos." - Man Ray
My Gallery...
My Other Gallery...

  

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walkerr Administrator Awarded for his con tributed articles published at the Resources Awarded for his in-depth knowledge in multiple areas Nikonian since 05th May 2002Thu 03-Jan-13 04:20 PM
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#4. "RE: Has altered reality become the new realism?"
In response to Reply # 0


Colorado Springs, US
          

Just as public perceptions of art and music have changed over time, they'll continue changing in photography. I think it's a healthy thing as long as there is tolerance across a broad spectrum of styles.

Rick Walker

My photos:
GeoVista Photography

  

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HBB Moderator Hal is an expert in several areas, including CLS Awarded for his excellent article contributions to the Resources. Charter MemberThu 03-Jan-13 09:24 PM
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#5. "RE: Has altered reality become the new realism?"
In response to Reply # 0


Phoenix, US
          

Dan:

I believe the paradigm shift is from those capturing images, to those creating images.

(This is probably the shortest post I have ever made on this site!)

Regards,

HBB in Phoenix, Arizona
Nikonian Team Member

Photography is a journey with no conceivable destination.

  

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spiritualized67 Silver Member Nikonian since 01st Mar 2007Fri 04-Jan-13 03:54 AM
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#8. "RE: Has altered reality become the new realism?"
In response to Reply # 5


Western PA, US
          

Poignant point Hal. Maybe I should take a lesson in brevity, lol

  

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Antero52 Silver Member Awarded for his expertise in post-processing, being  consistently helpful and professional. Nikonian since 07th Jul 2009Fri 04-Jan-13 01:25 AM
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#6. "RE: Has altered reality become the new realism?"
In response to Reply # 0


Vantaa, FI
          

When you say "the new realism" (in singular), it looks like you're considering only one line of development. For as long as I can remember, a part of photography has been exploration (and exploitation) of new techniques. In the 1970's I used copy film that produced solarized versions of photos (sheet film to be used similarly to photo paper). Other experimentary techniques of the 70's that I can remember include highly grainy B&W shots, various forms of cross processing, fisheye lenses, special panorama cameras with revolving lenses (I had a Russian Horizont camera for a while), or the like. I you read forums like diyphotography.net, you can see that there are hundreds of interesting techniques going on. Some of these are not for altering realism but creating realism, for instance photos of colling water drops in various illumination settings. High-speed photography or time-lapse photography are other lines in which we capture realism which cannot be seen by the naked eye.

I agree that when you look at various internet sites, much of the published photos are made with "instant art" filters of P&S cameras or smartphones. But there are other, more interesting lines of photography. You'll just to have to look a little harder to find them, as the best photos are not often published on free forums.

Best regads, Antero

  

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GiantTristan Silver Member Nikonian since 08th Jan 2006Fri 04-Jan-13 02:18 AM
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#7. "RE: Has altered reality become the new realism?"
In response to Reply # 0
Fri 04-Jan-13 02:26 AM by GiantTristan

Stamford, US
          

You definitely have a point, but I don't think that we are talking about irreversible changes, but more about passing fancies. One now sees a lot fewer hideous HDR masterpieces or NIR pictures of trees with white leaves than a few years ago. (I think that HDR has a place as long as it is done in a way that it does not "look" like an HDR image. IR photos, especially the ones involving clouds, can be very impressive). There are, however, a few other items that are hopefully a passing fashion e.g.:

- "Silky" waterfalls that look like Elmer's Glue.
- Over-saturated colors in sunsets that would put a movie director to
shame.
- Night Photographs in "living colors".
- A world without shadows.

Tristan

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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spiritualized67 Silver Member Nikonian since 01st Mar 2007Fri 04-Jan-13 05:07 AM
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#10. "RE: Has altered reality become the new realism?"
In response to Reply # 7


Western PA, US
          

I agree that over-baked HDR has started to fade back a bit - which is reassuring.

I suppose the real question is whether or not it really IS just a passing fancy, and maybe that's the ultimate point I'm trying to make without sounding too alarmist. It may not be a black and white thing just yet, but it is clearly trending in a certain direction - especially as people start moving away from traditional DSLRs and P&S cameras (into social-media connected smart phones with integrated post-processing capability).

I don't think we'll just wake up one day and every photo hanging from a gallery wall will look like an Instagram filter. But I do think our tolerance for such altered images (beyond simple edits) will dramatically increase - as will our reliance. How could it not.

The Internet continues to surprise me in so many ways in its ability to impact core human behaviors, perceptions and values (especially among the younger generation).

I don't know about you, but my kids just don't value the same things we valued when we were growing up. How this will affect our views on art is still evolving - but evolving under an entirely new and unpredictable set of rules IMHO.

~Dan

  

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HBB Moderator Hal is an expert in several areas, including CLS Awarded for his excellent article contributions to the Resources. Charter MemberFri 04-Jan-13 03:39 PM
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#16. "RE: Has altered reality become the new realism?"
In response to Reply # 10


Phoenix, US
          

Dan:

From my often peculiar perspective, the Internet experience to date has been an interesting social/cultural experiment.

When multiple gigabit/second fiber optic bandwidth reaches the last mile into the home and the workplace for a few dollars a month, the Internet will take on a complexion that few hominids walking around loose today can predict with any accuracy.

I am so glad I am now an observer and casual user of these technologies, and no longer a participant in their evolution.

Regards,

HBB in Phoenix, Arizona
Nikonian Team Member

Photography is a journey with no conceivable destination.

  

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blw Moderator Awarded for his high level of expertise in various areas Nikonian since 18th Jun 2004Fri 04-Jan-13 04:51 AM
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#9. "RE: Has altered reality become the new realism?"
In response to Reply # 0


Richmond, US
          

Nearly all of photography is about "altered reality." Sure, infared is pretty altered from our perspective, since we can't normally see into that spectrum. One might argue that HDR is LESS altered than much other photography. Our eyes can perceive more than our sensors, so one could easily argue that the regular snapshot is the altered reality.

But much more commonplace photography is really quite altered compared to the human experience:

- macro photography isn't what we normally see, at least not without magnifying classes and scanning, tunneling microscopes.

- telephoto lenses aren't what we normally see either.

- ultra-wide lenses distort perspective in ways that we rarely if ever see with our eyes.

- the blurred background of a pan is probably not visual reality as we perceive it.

- the water droplets coming out of a sprinkler, captured at 1/2000th are certainly not our experience of reality.

- the amazing visual complexity of a night scene captured with a 30 second exposure is often completely invisible to the naked eye.

more conventionally, every shot taken with black and white media is quite different than the perception of the average human; similarly, every shot taken with color media is different than the perception of the colorblind.

for that matter, essentially every shot taken with fuji velvia is a form of altered reality.

so are shots taken with graduated ND filters, polarizers, and starbursts captured at f/22 with a lens having an odd number of aperture blades.

and that's to say nothing of burning, dodging, sharpening and other "legitimate" post processing tools.

you mentioned emotion. not every image captures emotion as presented by the subject. some photographs, and i'd claim that many of the best, express the emotion of the photographer in ways that are simply not a part of the scene. so what was doctored there?

_____
Brian... a bicoastal Nikonian and Team Member

My gallery is online. Comments and critique welcomed any time!

  

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spiritualized67 Silver Member Nikonian since 01st Mar 2007Fri 04-Jan-13 05:34 AM
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#11. "RE: Has altered reality become the new realism?"
In response to Reply # 9


Western PA, US
          

Some very valid points Brian and very well stated. Yes, photography is inherently altered reality when you think about it.

But with an over reliance on using this altered reality (specifically as it relates to the prevalence of image-doctoring mobile photography apps) to make your photos look much better than they really are, don't you run the risk that the effect itself will be valued more than the underlying photo?

I'm not really talking about the process of photography (or the concepts for example, that might allow us to achieve the impression of a 3D world in an inherently 2D format), but more of the processing.

And the Internet and mobile has made it much easier to create and abuse these false realties - pushing our images well beyond traditional editing standards. The difference is, this is not just being done by a few people, it's being embraced by the masses.

  

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agitater Gold Member Nikonian since 18th Jan 2007Fri 04-Jan-13 12:05 PM
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#12. "RE: Has altered reality become the new realism?"
In response to Reply # 0


Toronto, CA
          

Dan - I think your observations are overstated in some sense, because they lend some pervasiveness to HDR and other kinds of extensive image processing that does not, in the main, occupy the efforts of the vast majority of photographers. Quite the contrary, while a notable percentage of photographers seem to have tried HDR and the concomittant post-processing, few have done it well and fewer still continue to pursue it. As Rick implied in this thread, there are a planetful of ideas and interests and sooner or later they'll manifest themselves among photographers. Something good usually comes out of almost every such interest eventually.

The other point to note about any creative interest is that while you (or me or anyone else in particular) is into it, our impression of how popular it is becomes skewed and unrealistic. The usual reason is simply that while we're pursuing something like HDR, we're also looking at a lot of HDR work online and in print and in galleries and so on, almost to the exclusion of everything else for a while at least. That gives us a false sense of how deeply any particular photography discipline has penetrated the general interest.

HDR and other special effects and range-extending techniques continue to be niche interests. Instagram will wane as soon as a significant percentage of users get bored with the same effects and looks over and over and over again. Instagram and Hipstamatic have to capitalize on current popularity quite quickly - before interest fades and the apps and services become relegated to the scrap heap.

Stray too far from reality for too long and people's interest begins to wear out. It's too hard for you, our fellow Nikonians, me and most everyone else to retain a long-term connection to an unachievable vision when the doing so requires a constant connection to hours of post-processing of multiple images in order to achieve a novelty look.

One of the reasons we do not tire of great SF&F movie CGI and the remarkable compositing being done is that the moviemakers strive mightily to achieve a vision of reality, not surreality. Moviemakers have long known that the more seamlessly their constructed SF&F realities mesh with visual and aural touchstones that exist around us in our normal lives, the more likely we are to accept the world created in their CGI alternates. By contrast, only the very best HDR leaves recognizably enough of the real world's visual textures, surfaces and detail renderings for us to be able to connect with it. Achieving that is hard work, and also requires a judicious eye that is actually sensitive to the importance of such things in the first place. All other HDR is, in my view, special effects for their own sake that anybody can do with some automated software. No skill or vision or creative effort involved. Meh.

Potential shift points in creative photography have occured for generations. Actual shift points are very rare indeed though. Human beings do not in the main simply toss away reality in favor of surreality in any area of interest, work, leisure or interpersonal life. We're simply not built that way. HDR is just another fad that has already been relegated to the position of being just another special effect (albeit one that demands more effort to set up for than most other toolkit-type effects).

>everyone is entitled to his or her vision and style,
>and who are we to question this?

We are fellow photographers and we're, frankly, entitled to question any vision or style we choose to challenge, critique, laud or pan.

>Another case in point is the mass adoption and
>prevalence of iDevice photography apps – whose
>sole purpose it seems, would be to doctor a
>photo to the point where the lines between reality
>and fantasy are blurred.

You may be looking too specifically at your subject. There are more conventional photography apps for iPhone, iPad and iPod, and for various Android and Windows Phone devices, than there are special effects apps. Check out and compare the popularity of Camera+, Camera5i, KitCam, Snapseed and of course the Apple Camera app itself, to the popularity of things like Instagram and Hipstamatic. Instagram is far more about community photo sharing than it is about a particular special effect, and when judging it's position in this sort of discussion it's important to keep that perspective. Instagram is nothing like HDR in that regard. Trey Ratcliff's 100 Cameras app, a hugely popular effects app, is less about special effects than it is about playing with photos and having fun. The same is true of Camera Awesome, another hugely popular effects app. They're not about altered reality, just about having fun with photos and then sharing them.

The average iDevice owner apparently has upwards of seven different photography apps installed. But that same iDevice owner only uses one or two on a regular basis. HDR and other effects-loaded iDevice photos don't play well on Facebook and Twitter for long, much less on Flickr or other social/sharing sites outside the Instagram sphere and a couple of other very narrowly construed sites. Anyone who overdoes it with special effects eventually receives messages from friends and family pleading for a normal photo so that they can properly see what something looks like. Once again, and as always, special effects for their own sake wear out their welcome quite quickly.

Anyway, that's reality for you. People always in the great majority insist on a realism with which they can connect. They do so, especially if they're follow photographers, because they see in such realism the possibility that they too might one day be in a position to make some great shot - the one with which they connected personally and which inspired them. HDR is just HDR - an interesting effect that has already begun to wear thin as the inherently and remarkably wide dynamic range of the latest camera sensors begin to do a far better natural job of it than any laborious HDR post-processing.

My Nikonians Gallery

Howard Carson, Managing Editor
Kickstartnews Inc. - http://www.kickstartnews.com

  

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spiritualized67 Silver Member Nikonian since 01st Mar 2007Fri 04-Jan-13 02:15 PM
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#14. "RE: Has altered reality become the new realism?"
In response to Reply # 12


Western PA, US
          

Exactly the perspective I needed to read Howard - thank you for your thoughtful points!

I suppose I'm just trying to make sense of all this new technology.

~Dan

  

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agitater Gold Member Nikonian since 18th Jan 2007Sat 05-Jan-13 02:04 AM
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#19. "RE: Has altered reality become the new realism?"
In response to Reply # 14


Toronto, CA
          

>Exactly the perspective I needed to read Howard - thank you
>for your thoughtful points!

Happy to discuss it. Your OP is what sparked this interesting thread.

>I suppose I'm just trying to make sense of all this new
>technology.

Now that I understand full well. I think the trick is to not try to keep up. Simply embracing only a general view of what's popular is sufficient I think. At some point in our lives I think we have to pursue our interests (photography in this case), confident that anything new that happens along and that also happens to be something which will help move our photography along will come to us rather than us having to come to it.

I think HDR, Instagram, Facebook, tablet computing and app-enabled smartphones (among many other products and current fads) are all of a piece, and that they're are all fair game for derision and baleful criticism. I feel that way because they often seem to me to be methodologies and products in search of customers; solutions in search of problems if you will.

My Nikonians Gallery

Howard Carson, Managing Editor
Kickstartnews Inc. - http://www.kickstartnews.com

  

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PAStime Silver Member Nikonian since 10th Feb 2009Fri 04-Jan-13 02:01 PM
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#13. "RE: Has altered reality become the new realism?"
In response to Reply # 0
Fri 04-Jan-13 02:06 PM by PAStime

Kingston, CA
          

>Rather, I’d just like to ponder how societal views seem to be
>changing based on the hyper-fast multi-media culture we find
>ourselves in; a culture with a seemingly voracious and endless
>appetite for altered reality - being fueled by the Internet,
>media, movies, smart phones, photography apps, etc.

Photography has never been more popular, the variety of cameras and post-processing options never so accessible, and the means of sharing one's output(from snapshot through to art) never so plentiful.

I would guess that the proportion of shots which aren't significantly "altered reality" not to be that much larger than say 20 years ago.

I took the shot below in Italy while not having my camera with me. I "only" had my beat up, 2-year old smartphone. Remarkable what's possible these days with the equipment we have available.

There is an irony in that the orton, hipstamatic, and instagram looks are in part inspired by the rudimentary post processing techniques, colour shifts, graininess and imperfections of film and Polaroid methods of the past.

Peter


  

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spiritualized67 Silver Member Nikonian since 01st Mar 2007Fri 04-Jan-13 02:20 PM
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#15. "RE: Has altered reality become the new realism?"
In response to Reply # 13


Western PA, US
          

"There is an irony in that the orton, hipstamatic, and instagram looks are in part inspired by the rudimentary post processing techniques, colour shifts, graininess and imperfections of film and Polaroid methods of the past."

How true! I admit that I do enjoy some of these retro apps myself from time to time. There's a neat one for movies called 8mm that makes my iPhone videos look way cool. Nice pix BTW.

  

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dagoldst Silver Member Nikonian since 02nd Dec 2012Fri 04-Jan-13 09:45 PM
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#17. "RE: Has altered reality become the new realism?"
In response to Reply # 0


Little Rock, US
          

I just take this sort of thing one image at a time. One over the top HDR may be ridiculous looking, another one a well executed vision. Same with IR.

David

"Sawed that board three times and it is still too short... "

  

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rectangularimage Silver Member Nikonian since 01st Oct 2009Sat 05-Jan-13 12:29 AM
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#18. "RE: Has altered reality become the new realism?"
In response to Reply # 0


San Diego, US
          

I think the iPhone/hipstamatic/instagram trend is because the vast majority of iPhone photographers don't know anything about photography and produce pretty mundane and uninteresting "straight" photography and the retro/lo-fi push-button post processing often does improve it.

But it is a trend and it's getting overused and the masses will soon tire of it.

My website | My Nikonians gallery

  

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KenLPhotos Gold Member Nikonian since 26th Jul 2009Sat 05-Jan-13 12:18 PM
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#20. "RE: Has altered reality become the new realism?"
In response to Reply # 0
Sun 06-Jan-13 12:14 AM by KenLPhotos

Stewartstown, US
          

Altered reality photo images are bad when they are meant to deceive. But this thread proves that the viewers are becoming used to the possibility that an image may be altered and that it may be on one side of the reality fence or the other. Look how quickly the public jumped on the 'Ladies Of the Congress' photo in the news yesterday.

http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/ticket/nancy-pelosi-defends-doctored-photo-women-congress-174037761--election.html

The intent and the result are what is important. No one today faults any old master for trying the latest technologies.

KenL

Visit my Nikonians gallery.



There are many 'images of beautiful objects' but few 'beautiful images of objects'.

  

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RLDubbya Silver Member Nikonian since 24th Dec 2011Sat 05-Jan-13 09:49 PM
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#21. "RE: Has altered reality become the new realism?"
In response to Reply # 0


US
          

Dan,

How do you feel about Ansel Adams' work?

Bob

  

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spiritualized67 Silver Member Nikonian since 01st Mar 2007Mon 07-Jan-13 12:49 PM
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#22. "RE: Has altered reality become the new realism?"
In response to Reply # 21


Western PA, US
          

Ha, Bob...I know where this one's going. I've read all of Adams' books and know that he often spent hours in the darkroom dodging and burning. But let's not forget that behind his mastery of the zone system and darkroom technique, were foundationally excellent photos and composition.

The techniques he employed reinforced what was already there.

Anyhow, I think I've said enough on this topic - and certainly appreciate all the opinions.

~Dan

  

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