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Forums Lobby CAFÉ English Café (Public) topic #86288
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Subject: "More proof of durability of Nikon Cameras " Previous topic | Next topic
Sportymonk   Rocky Mount, US  Registered since 16th Jul 2007 Tue 01-Jan-13 05:46 PM
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"More proof of durability of Nikon Cameras "



From a Linked-In Linking Nikon Post

Don't know if you can open the link but here it is. http://www.linkedin.com/groupItem?view=&srchtype=discussedNews&gid=130599&item=199813640&type=member&trk=eml-anet_dig-b_pd-ttl-cn&ut=3D4IsOYKM27BA1

Here is the article with the name removed

"More proof of the durability of Nikon cameras
I'm just back from a screening of "Chasing Ice," the documentary film based on photographer James Balog's remarkable efforts to show not only that glaciers are receding but also that they are doing so at an alarming rate. If you've not seen the film, its strong visual appeal alone should make it well worth your time. Rather than broach the topic of the film's potentially contentious message here, I'll leave that discussion for another forum at another time.

In addition to the film's visual appeal, it also offers something else of particular interest to members of this group: Balog recorded the glacier's movements with Nikon cameras. I couldn't tell which pro-level DSLR Balog himself used, but it surely was a D3 or D3s (or maybe both, at various times), since work on the project started in 2007, the year the D3 was released.

The real Nikon stars in the film, though, are all the D200 bodies left at various sites around the world to record the movements of the glaciers over long periods of time. One scene shows Balog and others unloading boxes and boxes and boxes of D200s. I thought there had to be two dozen of them, and I've now confirmed that 27 D200 bodies were used for the project. When Balog and his assistants are marveling that the cameras kept right on working even through the coldest temperatures, Balog notes that the temps were down to the range of -40 degrees Fahrenheit (if memory serves me correctly).

This has been a good year for proof of the durability of Nikon cameras. First we had the grizzly bear trying but failing to maul a D4. Now this film shows that the semi-pro cameras can take plenty of abuse, too. "

Nikonians is the Smithsonian of Nikon knowledge. If there is a question they can't answer, I want to see the question.

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My Blog : www.HLDPhotos.blogspot.com

  

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dagoldst Gold Member  Little Rock, US  Nikonian since 02nd Dec 2012 Tue 01-Jan-13 08:39 PM
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#1. "RE: More proof of durability of Nikon Cameras "
In response to Reply # 0



Nice to hear the D200 was so fundamental to the project - I am keeping mine and am thinking of converting it to IR as it has a lot of life left in it.

David

"Sawed that board three times and it is still too short... "

  

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King Nothing Gold Member  Cranbrook, CA  Nikonian since 31st Dec 2011 Tue 01-Jan-13 08:52 PM
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#2. "RE: More proof of durability of Nikon Cameras "
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I just saw a National Geographic special a couple days ago called Extreme Ice on the Knowledge Network. I don't think its exactly the same thing because it included footage and images from sources in addition to Balog but the photography was amazing and eye opening. I remember trying to figure out what camera he was using for all the shots every time the camera showed him. For at least part of it he was using the D3s with the 14-24 and 24-70. I didn't get a good look at the cameras they put into the boxes for the time lapse shots but I'm not surprised that they were D200s.

I really recommend watching it if you can. Its surprising just how quickly the ice is disappearing all over. I was amazed at some of the risks he took to get the shot too. I wouldn't be able to climb into a crumbling ice hole that could collapse at any moment like he did.

Chris

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greenday Silver Member  Nepean, CA  Nikonian since 20th May 2007 Thu 03-Jan-13 11:29 AM
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#3. "RE: More proof of durability of Nikon Cameras "
In response to Reply # 2



I wish I could relate such good tidings with my D200. Unfortunately Nikon decided to sell me a camera with a known defect, Dead Battery Syndrome, and has not cared enough to actually fix it. temporary fixes sometimes happen with a software update but it never lasts. After several dozen reloads of the software I have given up, now it's just an attractive paperweight, it is not worth fixing and only was a backup for my D7000 since 2summers ago.

Nice of Nikon to support known problems, makes me really enthusiastic to upgrade to a Pro-level DSLR, just wish I didsn't have so much invested in the Nikon Stem or I'd dump it all to move to a more robust platform. By the way I have many film Nikons that continue to perform fine, years after they have become "redundant". I'd love to sell this turkey but would NEVER foist such a piece of junk on an unsuspecting buyer. I wonder how far I c ould toss it?

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txstone12 Gold Member Donor Ribbon awarded for his generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014   Texas, US  Nikonian since 12th Feb 2012 Sun 06-Jan-13 04:35 PM
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#4. "RE: More proof of durability of Nikon Cameras "
In response to Reply # 0



I missed the National Geographic special Chris mentions - I'll have to look for it.

The Extreme Ice Survey was founded by James Balog, ref a link to the EIS site I posted here

http://www.nikonians.org/forums/dcboard.php?az=set_threaded_mode&forum=190&topic_id=83821&prev_page=show_topic&gid=83821#83821

There's a little more information on the lenses used on the Nikon D200s.

I saw a pre-release showing (not high definition) of the film and an interview with Jeff Orlowski, the film's Director/Producer back in Aug at the Sun Valley Writer's Conference. I'm ready to see it again.

David

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