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Subject: "Danger of breathing on lenses - urban myth?" Previous topic | Next topic
ericbowles Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge and high level skills in various areas, especially Landscape and Wildlife Photoghraphy Writer Ribbon awarded for for his article contributions to the community Nikonian since 25th Nov 2005Sat 08-Dec-12 02:13 PM
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"Danger of breathing on lenses - urban myth?"


Atlanta, US
          

This morning Nikon Rumors highlighted a post about the danger of cleaning lenses or filters by breathing on the glass or using saliva. I'm putting this in the "urban myth" category and attributing it to old or bad information perpetuated by Nikon and others. Please correct me if I'm off base and there is a real risk.

Here's a link to the post:
http://nikonrumors.com/2012/12/07/nikon-support-do-not-breathe-on-your-lens-to-clean-it-your-breath-contains-harmful-acids-that-could-damage-the-lens-coating.aspx/

And here's a link to Nikon's statement:
http://support.nikonusa.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/539/~/how-do-i-clean-the-camera-lens?

Saliva does not actually contain acids. It has a high ph and neutralizes acids which could lead to decay. Acids from food or beverages are normally neutralized within 30 minutes. Enzymes and proteins in saliva may have a negative effect, but the issue does not appear to be related to acids so I question the entire statement.

It’s extremely unlikely that the development and improvements to coatings would maintain a vulnerability to saliva or breathing on a lens since it is so common. You would expect that they would simply create coatings that are durable enough to avoid problems.

Nikon has had this on their website since 2002. I’ve seen it before the 2011 update that is referenced. That means it likely predates the formulation current coatings. As such, it looks like another piece of information that lacks true verification. I’ve seen that with batteries as well – where Nikon’s support site conflicts with the manufacturer’s statements and third party facts about storage.

I would expect that someone would have seen an issue with the impact of saliva or breath on lenses or filters – and I’ve never seen anyone express that idea.

It’s interesting also that filter makers don’t have this same warning.
http://www.hoyafilter.com/support/tips-techniques/how-to-clean-filters/
http://www.schneideroptics.com/info/faq/bw.htm#qu17

So I would call this an Urban Myth perpetuated by various websites and Nikon.


Eric Bowles
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Reply message RE: Danger of breathing on lenses - urban myth?
esantos Moderator
08th Dec 2012
1
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JonK Moderator
08th Dec 2012
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esantos Moderator Nikonians Resources Writer. Recognized for his outstanding reviews on printers and printing articles. Awarded for his high level of expertise in various areas, including Landscape Photography Awarded for his extraordinary accomplishments in Landscape Photography. His work has been exhibited at the Smithsonian. Nikonian since 10th Nov 2002Sat 08-Dec-12 02:55 PM
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#1. "RE: Danger of breathing on lenses - urban myth?"
In response to Reply # 0


McAllen, US
          

Hah, interesting Eric. I don't recall ever using my bodily fluids to clean my equipment. Shoot, I'm probably more guilty of not cleaning my lenses often enough, but this is good to know that this all probably a myth. I did a quick search on snopes.com and didn't find anything on this.

Ernesto Santos
esartprints.com Ernesto Santos Photography

  

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JonK Moderator Awarded for his high level skills and in-depth knowledge in various areas, such as Wildlife, Landscape and Stage Photography Nikonian since 03rd Jul 2004Sat 08-Dec-12 05:27 PM
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#2. "RE: Danger of breathing on lenses - urban myth?"
In response to Reply # 0


New York, US
          

When in need, you use what's available. I've seen a really good pro use a T-shirt to clean his lens.

Jon Kandel
A New York City Nikonian and Team Member
Please visit my website and critique the images!

  

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2pixels_short Gold Member Laureate Ribbon awarded for winning in the Best of Nikonians 2013 images Photo Contest Nikonian since 16th Oct 2003Sat 08-Dec-12 05:56 PM
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#3. "RE: Danger of breathing on lenses - urban myth?"
In response to Reply # 0


Anchorage, US
          

When I breathe on my lens or camera body this time of year, all I get is frost.

Mike in Alaska


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texspeel Silver Member Nikonian since 09th Nov 2011Sat 08-Dec-12 05:57 PM
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#4. "RE: Danger of breathing on lenses - urban myth?"
In response to Reply # 0


Fairfax Station, US
          

Eric,
Why don't you try it on your lenses and let us know how it comes out?
Best, Tom

"Nothing can be recognized without light and shade. It is only through the eye, the window of the soul, that we can truly understand the complex workings of nature." - Leonardo da Vinci

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walkerr Administrator Awarded for his con tributed articles published at the Resources Awarded for his in-depth knowledge in multiple areas Nikonian since 05th May 2002Sat 08-Dec-12 06:58 PM
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#5. "RE: Danger of breathing on lenses - urban myth?"
In response to Reply # 0


Colorado Springs, US
          

I've done it since I was ten, which was forty years ago. I've had no problems so far, whether on lenses or filters, and I don't plan on changing my practices.

Rick Walker

My photos:
GeoVista Photography

  

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ZoneV Silver Member Nikonian since 08th Jan 2005Sat 08-Dec-12 09:10 PM
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#6. "RE: Danger of breathing on lenses - urban myth?"
In response to Reply # 0
Sun 09-Dec-12 11:24 PM by ZoneV

US
          

I'd be more concerned about bacteria...there are bacteria in our mouth, and when they find their way onto the glass, they could start growing and infest the lens like fungus does, perhaps.

An undeniable paradox: To think that there is any such thing as an absolute rule is at worst naïve, and at best, shortsighted. There is no such thing as an always-true, all context- or situation-salient, absolute rule that always holds true…including this one!

  

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ericbowles Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge and high level skills in various areas, especially Landscape and Wildlife Photoghraphy Writer Ribbon awarded for for his article contributions to the community Nikonian since 25th Nov 2005Sat 08-Dec-12 09:23 PM
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#7. "RE: Danger of breathing on lenses - urban myth?"
In response to Reply # 6


Atlanta, US
          

True - but bacteria and fungus are two very different things. And isn't the risk of bacteria the same on the surfaces of all photo gear - especially those that are rarely cleaned or have crevices like buttons and controls? And while technically possible, have you ever heard of any photo gear damaged by bacteria?

I've been using my breath to clean filters as well. I have subjected gear to all kinds of use and abuse - and breathing or spitting on gear is not what I put in the category of abuse.


Eric Bowles
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nrothschild Silver Member Neil is an expert in several areas, including camera support Nikonian since 25th Jul 2004Sat 08-Dec-12 09:53 PM
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#8. "RE: Danger of breathing on lenses - urban myth?"
In response to Reply # 0
Sat 08-Dec-12 10:39 PM by nrothschild

US
          

Earlier this year, we had a discussion about the chemical constitution of our breath here.

I would not be so quick chalk it off to urban myth unless you want to suggest that the antacid market is a scam, and that acid reflux is also an urban myth.

What I'm trying to say is that I don;t think it is possible to make sweeping and general statements about breath chemistry.

I note a number of inconsistencies and ambiguities in the lens and filter maker recommendations. I also note that none of them warranty their lenses or filter coatings against cleaning damage. For example, Hoya specifically disclaims use of their method on actual camera lenses.

Hoya specifically recommends not using "standard lens cleaning cloths", yet Schneider says it is ok. Unless it an older non-MRC coating, for which only they feel competent to clean.

I personally subscribe to this extremely conservative point of view. It is considered extreme here, but in the astronomical community that thinking is not only mainstream, that is almost always referenced in the context of optics cleaning instructions. It is "the Bible".

Edit: for the record, I only use distilled water on my lenses.

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Neil


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jhanes55 Silver Member Nikonian since 19th Feb 2010Sat 08-Dec-12 10:15 PM
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#9. "RE: Danger of breathing on lenses - urban myth?"
In response to Reply # 0
Sun 09-Dec-12 06:15 PM by jhanes55

Surprise, US
          

Eric,
I have used both Tee shirts (or)clean cotton handkerchief for years. Really tough cleaning , like a spray from fire hose or chemicals at a fire I add siliva, also works for Race car exhaust and fluids. It does not taste well but keeps things clean till I get home

Jerry
I have to add this was in the day of Tri x with grain the size of go
lf balls, and I use a UV filter

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grizzly200 Registered since 18th Dec 2011Sun 09-Dec-12 01:32 AM
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#10. "RE: Danger of breathing on lenses - urban myth?"
In response to Reply # 0


Solano County, California, US
          

I was taught many years ago not to clean lens surfaces with breath--the idea was that acids in saliva were not good for lens coatings. I've followed that rule since, although I doubt there would be any problem. I keep filters on all my lenses, and I do breathe on them to clean them, though.

James

  

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Pouncer Silver Member Nikonian since 22nd Jan 2009Sun 09-Dec-12 01:42 AM
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#11. "RE: Danger of breathing on lenses - urban myth?"
In response to Reply # 0


Memphis, US
          

Like many things, done occasionally and in moderation, it is probably not a problem.

Do it repeatedly over many years, and maybe you have an issue.

I use a microfiber cloth and lens cleaner on my lenses as needed, but from time to time when out and about resort to breathing and a cotton shirt.

Garrett

This is my Nikonians gallery.

  

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RockyIII Gold Member Nikonian since 27th May 2006Sun 09-Dec-12 03:03 AM
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#12. "RE: Danger of breathing on lenses - urban myth?"
In response to Reply # 0


Raleigh, US
          

I was cleaning a sensor today, and I had a speck that was resistant to the Rocket Blower. I almost instinctively blew with my mouth on the sensor but didn't. Four wet swabs later all was fine.

Rocky

  

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archivue Gold Member Nikonian since 26th Mar 2002Sun 09-Dec-12 09:54 AM
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#13. "RE: Danger of breathing on lenses - urban myth?"
In response to Reply # 0


Paris, FR
          

Well, don't clean the lenses with coke... Keep it for the jewelers

While I don't have the habit of licking my lenses clean (nor my dinner's plates), I feel there are two distinct topics here...

Fogging the lens (or filter) with breath: That's just the physical aspect of the dew point ! Either you shift temperature on a thin surface (low thermal resistivity) or you shift hygrometry! In either case you have dew on the flimsy surface (bathroom shower on mirror, or cold car's windshield once you get in). Breath brings moisture (thus elevation in hygrometry) plus some relative heat (unless you're already in a scorching desert at noon).
The "dew" on the lens is mostly of atmospheric origin with a bit of your inner moisture (pure H2O in any cases, the lens itself has as many bacterias then the fauna in your mouth)!

Spitting on the lens is another problem: Just don't share it with someone you don't know intimately
Joking aside, spit (or saliva) doesn't dry up like pure water, and depending of each individual's health (or bad habits) a film residue can be left and while the small speck has disappeared, you now have a bigger area for blooming or other light bending virtues...

As others have already mentioned, the "danger" is more in the tool you will use for cleaning after the "wet" part ! The good old T-shirt, the "not so clean" handkerchief, a very special cloth, paper tissues... That, anyhow, will move under pressure all those little silicate particles along the nice polished surface of the lens, grinding whatever coating, slowly but surely !

So the myth is more about the "bad" habit of cleaning the lenses too much in an non controlled situation, then about some "lens eating zombie bacteria"... Gee !

Jacques

"Un photographe, finalement, c'est quelqu'un comme les autres, mais qui prend des photos." - Man Ray
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DeanAZ Moderator Expert nature photographer Nikonian since 28th Apr 2007Sun 09-Dec-12 04:04 PM
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#14. "RE: Danger of breathing on lenses - urban myth?"
In response to Reply # 13


Phoenix, US
          

Well said Jacques! This is my opinion as well. As long as you are not spitting saliva onto the lens the fog you create on the surface is essentially pure distilled water.

Dean
Phoenix, Arizona USA
Nikonians Team Member
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nrothschild Silver Member Neil is an expert in several areas, including camera support Nikonian since 25th Jul 2004Sun 09-Dec-12 04:20 PM
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#15. "RE: Danger of breathing on lenses - urban myth?"
In response to Reply # 14


US
          

I'm surprised how many people think they know more than Nikon about their coatings (which they have been making for 50 years now) and what may or may not damage it. I have trouble writing off Nikon's recommendation as their being duped by an urban myth.

Just food for thought.

_________________________________
Neil


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DeanAZ Moderator Expert nature photographer Nikonian since 28th Apr 2007Sun 09-Dec-12 05:01 PM
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#16. "RE: Danger of breathing on lenses - urban myth?"
In response to Reply # 15


Phoenix, US
          

I'm not writing off their advice but I think I'm balancing the risk involved with ruining a shot because my lens needs to be cleaned (and I don't have the recommended cleaning gear at my disposal) with the cost of my lens and considering how little non-water volatile chemicals are actually in my breath, the short time that these chemicals are actually in contact with the surface, the much more likely scenario that over time micro-abrasive particles will wear out the coatings long before any chemicals in my breath will.

I'm not chalking it up to an urban myth but I think they are being overly cautious, like most of the legal disclaimers and warnings that accompany any product that uses power and gets plugged into the wall. Common sense should still have a place and any risk needs to be balanced.

Dean
Phoenix, Arizona USA
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nrothschild Silver Member Neil is an expert in several areas, including camera support Nikonian since 25th Jul 2004Sun 09-Dec-12 05:27 PM
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#17. "RE: Danger of breathing on lenses - urban myth?"
In response to Reply # 16


US
          

My comment was more aimed at the general thrust of the thread, and in particular the post you agreed with, which is that Nikon "doesn't know what they are doing" (or saying) and that there is absolutely nothing wrong with breathing on a lens... once, twice, or as a standard procedure.

I agree that this is partly an issue of frequency, and also relative harm, but you did not address this in your prior comment, which appeared to me to be more general in nature.

Some coatings are said to be only one or two molecules thick and are considered "extremely fragile". That is usually said in the context of astronomical lenses. I have no idea what method Nikon uses or how thick the coatings are. They have surely used different coatings over the years, which complicates this discussion. That is why I am reluctant to write off their recommendation as urban myth.

It is certainly possible that photo lenses have "tougher" coatings because they are "abused" more. But I do not know that for a fact, or even have any specific reason to suspect it. I only suggest it as one possibility.

Nikon may not have the best translators for their various manuals and other communications. But they aren't stupid when it comes to optics. They know far, far more than any of us ever will, and likely as much as any other organization on Earth. Again, just food for thought.

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ericbowles Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge and high level skills in various areas, especially Landscape and Wildlife Photoghraphy Writer Ribbon awarded for for his article contributions to the community Nikonian since 25th Nov 2005Sun 09-Dec-12 07:02 PM
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#20. "RE: Danger of breathing on lenses - urban myth?"
In response to Reply # 17


Atlanta, US
          

Neil

You've got a pretty good sense of astronomy optics which was why I asked you to comment. I've seen this concept specifically related to astronomy and it seems to trace back to Thomas Beck - now deceased. But even in his forums there was little beyond the basic statement - and no support. Beck was an optical designer of telescopes.

I've seen several statements about carbonic acid being the problem. But carbonic acid is not stable in the presence of water and breaks down into carbon dioxide and water. It is also relatively hard to form and does not naturally form in the mouth.

I'm sure there are other acids that can enter the picture from food or drink. And if you immediately breathed on a lens you could contaminate the lens with that acid. But given that the high PH of the mouth normally neutralizes any acid with in 30 minutes, food acids are not a big problem.



Eric Bowles
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richardd300 Silver Member Nikonian since 19th Apr 2009Sun 09-Dec-12 07:31 PM
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#22. "RE: Danger of breathing on lenses - urban myth?"
In response to Reply # 20


Dyserth, GB
          

I went to party last night and wouldn't have dared to breath on my lens this morning

Seriously though, I cannot believe that breath contains damaging products, at least that would affect the lens coating.

Now contact with skin is a totally different thing.

Richard

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The important thing is not to stop questioning. Curiosity has its own reason for existing. Einstein

  

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ericbowles Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge and high level skills in various areas, especially Landscape and Wildlife Photoghraphy Writer Ribbon awarded for for his article contributions to the community Nikonian since 25th Nov 2005Sun 09-Dec-12 05:55 PM
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#18. "RE: Danger of breathing on lenses - urban myth?"
In response to Reply # 15


Atlanta, US
          

I've seen enough information on the Nikon support site to not immediately accept everything they say. Nikon does not put the same rigor into everything on their support site that they do in design. Like many companies, the easy answer is often good enough. We see that with conflicting statements, clearly incorrect statements, and statements that are unlikely to be true.

I think that whoever originally wrote the feedback had some undocumented source - probably on the internet - and saw no reason to look to validate the comment. From my perspective, I am very doubtful of the remark and have not been able to find a single shred of validation. I see the same comment repeated as "conventional wisdom" but in all cases without a link to actual damage - just "potential".


Eric Bowles
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nrothschild Silver Member Neil is an expert in several areas, including camera support Nikonian since 25th Jul 2004Sun 09-Dec-12 06:32 PM
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#19. "RE: Danger of breathing on lenses - urban myth?"
In response to Reply # 18
Sun 09-Dec-12 08:09 PM by nrothschild

US
          

Eric, you own well north of $20K worth of optics and you are basing your decision on what you think, not what you know. You are writing off Nikon's advice solely because you think they were wrong on some other subject.

Now, following your logic to its inevitable conclusion, you should never quote anything Nikon has ever written about anything. Surely they are clueless. Think about it. That goes for the product manuals too. If I do some searching here I suspect I will find some quotes from you that run counter to what you suggest here.

You may be right or you may be wrong. I would not argue that. In fact, my argument is that none of us know enough to state a definitive opinion, and because of that I am reluctant to write-off Nikon's advice out of hand. And that is why I personally err on the side of caution.

If you are looking for a shred of evidence that human breath contains something other than distilled water vapor, and in particular acids, start here. The page I linked goes into a long discussion about the evolutionary reasons why humans generate acid in their airways as a defense mechanism , and how it might be measured.

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dhrphoto Silver Member Nikonian since 03rd Sep 2007Sun 09-Dec-12 07:24 PM
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#21. "RE: Danger of breathing on lenses - urban myth?"
In response to Reply # 19
Sun 09-Dec-12 07:47 PM by dhrphoto

Laurel, US
          

I have heard not to blow the dust from the filter or lens, there is a possibility that saliva can be expelled. That is probably the thinking behind breathing on the lens. And what if Nikon support said it was ok, then people would be blaming Nikon support, they said it was ok and now my lens is messed up. I think they should replace it for free, maybe I'll get a lawyer, or I'll never buy another Nikon product! "Better to be safe than sorry"!

May Your Day Be Happy And
Full Of Beautiful Images
D.H.R.

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ericbowles Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge and high level skills in various areas, especially Landscape and Wildlife Photoghraphy Writer Ribbon awarded for for his article contributions to the community Nikonian since 25th Nov 2005Sun 09-Dec-12 07:41 PM
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#23. "RE: Danger of breathing on lenses - urban myth?"
In response to Reply # 19


Atlanta, US
          

Canon advises blowing on the lens as part of their cleaning regimen.
http://www.usa.canon.com/app/html/EFLenses101/lens_care.html


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dhrphoto Silver Member Nikonian since 03rd Sep 2007Sun 09-Dec-12 07:53 PM
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#24. "RE: Danger of breathing on lenses - urban myth?"
In response to Reply # 23


Laurel, US
          

Canon also shows in their commercial it's ok to walk along the ridge of a snowy roof to take a photograph, anybody game?

May Your Day Be Happy And
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D.H.R.

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nrothschild Silver Member Neil is an expert in several areas, including camera support Nikonian since 25th Jul 2004Sun 09-Dec-12 08:17 PM
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#25. "RE: Danger of breathing on lenses - urban myth?"
In response to Reply # 23


US
          

Canon also, on the same page and context, advises you to always use a protective filter. Do you subscribe to that too?

Or are you picking and choosing here, on both sites?

_________________________________
Neil


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ericbowles Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge and high level skills in various areas, especially Landscape and Wildlife Photoghraphy Writer Ribbon awarded for for his article contributions to the community Nikonian since 25th Nov 2005Sun 09-Dec-12 09:49 PM
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#29. "RE: Danger of breathing on lenses - urban myth?"
In response to Reply # 25


Atlanta, US
          

<Canon also, on the same page and context, advises you to always use a protective filter. Do you subscribe to that too?

Or are you picking and choosing here, on both sites?>

That's a good example of why we shouldn't fully and blindly accept all statements posted on the internet - even from a manufacturer. We can have a logical discussion about pros and cons of filters. And we won't go into the pros and cons here.

I'm sure that most of the comments are correct from both Nikon and Canon. But every now and then they each seem to miss the mark or overstate a case. I think that's what's happening here - just overstating a case.

It's not something most would really care about except social media picks up a post and highlights the issue. The rest is history.


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dhrphoto Silver Member Nikonian since 03rd Sep 2007Sun 09-Dec-12 10:23 PM
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#30. "RE: Danger of breathing on lenses - urban myth?"
In response to Reply # 29
Sun 09-Dec-12 10:33 PM by dhrphoto

Laurel, US
          

><Canon also, on the same page and context, advises you to
>always use a protective filter. Do you subscribe to that too?
>
>Or are you picking and choosing here, on both sites?>
>
>That's a good example of why we shouldn't fully and blindly
>accept all statements posted on the internet - even from a
>manufacturer. We can have a logical discussion about pros and
>cons of filters. And we won't go into the pros and cons here.
>

You started this thread, telling people it's ok to breathe
on their lenses. And you also referred to a Canon thread saying the same. Try doing it in freezing weather.

Why do you knock Nikon, for some people it is not safe for them to breathe on their lenses.
For they spray it instead of say it!
And I refer you to my first post on this subject.

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D.H.R.

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richardd300 Silver Member Nikonian since 19th Apr 2009Sun 09-Dec-12 08:21 PM
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#26. "RE: Danger of breathing on lenses - urban myth?"
In response to Reply # 18
Sun 09-Dec-12 08:24 PM by richardd300

Dyserth, GB
          

<<We see that with conflicting statements, clearly incorrect statements, and statements that are unlikely to be true.>>

A particular example in my view is that of the use of VR in their manuals etc. the old rule of thumb was that the speed should exceed the intended focal length by x1.5 for non optically stabilised lenses when handheld. I have read many an article including Thom Hogan's where the application of an extremely high shutter speed with VR on could cause problems as the system gets confused. Much in the same way that it does if VR is left on whilst tripod mounted, although there are lenses that cope with this. I wonder how many folks remember to switch it off on a 70-200mm when shooting at 1/500 sec? Nikon make no mention or give guidance on this issue in their manuals.

So yes, my argument is that it's sometimes it maybe what they don't tell us that can become a problem. I'm sure someone will advise me if my understanding is wrong

Richard

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dhrphoto Silver Member Nikonian since 03rd Sep 2007Sun 09-Dec-12 09:31 PM
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#28. "RE: Danger of breathing on lenses - urban myth?"
In response to Reply # 26
Sun 09-Dec-12 09:46 PM by dhrphoto

Laurel, US
          

>A particular example in my view is that of the use of VR in
>their manuals etc. the old rule of thumb was that the speed
>should exceed the intended focal length by x1.5for non
>optically stabilised lenses when handheld.

I heard and learned 50mm lens, shoot at 1/60 of a second, 200mm lens shoot at 1/250 of a second. With practice, a steady hand and good holding technique you will be able to go slower.

>I have read many an
>article including Thom Hogan's where the application of an
>extremely high shutter speed with VR on could cause problems
>as the system gets confused. Much in the same way that it
>does if VR is left on whilst tripod mounted, although there
>are lenses that cope with this. I wonder how many folks
>remember to switch it off on a 70-200mm when shooting at 1/500
>sec? Nikon make no mention or give guidance on this issue in
>their manuals.

How can the camera and lens combination get confused? The two different systems are designed to work together aren't they? Also one doesn't need VR at very high shutter speeds. As for being tripod mounted the elements minute movements is more than the vibriation when mounted, hence tripod mode.

I rarely use VR, and when I do it is hand held at slower than focal lenth shutter speeds. Most of my DSLR shooting is done from a tripod.
And I do remember to turn it off.
Now if I was shooting birds taking off to high in flight that could be a different story!

>So yes, my argument is that it's sometimes it maybe what they
>don't tell us that can become a problem. I'm sure someone will
>advise me if my understanding is wrong

Could be true.

May Your Day Be Happy And
Full Of Beautiful Images
D.H.R.

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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blw Moderator Awarded for his high level of expertise in various areas Nikonian since 18th Jun 2004Sun 09-Dec-12 08:26 PM
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#27. "RE: Danger of breathing on lenses - urban myth?"
In response to Reply # 0


Richmond, US
          

I don't know if there's anything specific about breath, but certainly it is the case that most urban atmospheres have significant components of mild acids. These are created by the combination of water vapor and sulfur and nitrous oxides that are in atmospheric gases. I would think that there's a lot more acid in a little bit of urban ran than what you might find in the fog created by a little breath.

I don't know the various details or numbers, but having seen the actual impact of acidic rain, it certainly seems plausible to me that there's more likelihood there than from breath...

_____
Brian... a bicoastal Nikonian and Team Member

My gallery is online. Comments and critique welcomed any time!

  

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ScottChapin Moderator Awarded for his high level skills in various areas, including Aviation and Birds Photography Charter MemberSun 09-Dec-12 11:48 PM
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#31. "RE: Danger of breathing on lenses - urban myth?"
In response to Reply # 0


Powder Springs, US
          

I usually clean my lens with a microfiber cloth, brushing it first, if there is particulate mater. Only rarely do I breathe on a lens, but have done so for years in the event that there is something stubborn on the lens. There have been no ill results yet and I do avoid doing it.

I also shoot with Nikon clear filters and I don't worry about them in the least for obvious reasons. Should I decide to stop using the filters, I would probably pack lens cleaning fluid. Not because I would be afraid of breathing on the lens, but more so to be able to put a more generous amount of liquid on the lens to gently loosen grit safely and tenderly.

Scott Chapin
Powder Springs, GA, USA
Nikonians Team Member

  

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walkerr Administrator Awarded for his con tributed articles published at the Resources Awarded for his in-depth knowledge in multiple areas Nikonian since 05th May 2002Sat 22-Dec-12 02:05 AM
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#32. "RE: Danger of breathing on lenses - urban myth?"
In response to Reply # 0


Colorado Springs, US
          

If you read their statement now, Nikon's phrase about breathing or saliva damaging your lens has now been removed. Apparently they decided their advice lacked merit or was inaccurate. Hmm.

Rick Walker

My photos:
GeoVista Photography

  

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