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Subject: "Is the DSLR headed for extinction?" Previous topic | Next topic
krf Silver Member Charter MemberSun 04-Nov-12 07:39 PM
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"Is the DSLR headed for extinction?"


Gainesville, US
          

In recent weeks I have read blogs from numerous professional photographers (mostly wedding and event photographers) who are migrating to mirrorless systems. Sony and Leica (if you can afford it) have the leading mirrorless bodies at this point (24 MP).

Nikon recently announced the release of the 14.2 MP Nikon 1 V2, which B&H is offering through pre-order. This camera offers most of the features of a pro-level DSLR, plus seamless transition bewteen still and video capture, and still frame rates of up to 60 fps. One of the 1 Nikon lenses offers a 3-speed motorized zoom optimized for video.

These cameras are designed to allow still capture while shooting video, 1080p video, and stereo sound to enable true multimedia capture from one camera. I know many "purists" will decry these hybrids in favor of dedicated still and video cameras. However, there seems to be a fast growing group of professionals who are developing a market for multimedia products.

I may have to rethink upgrading to the next generation DSLR and take a serious look at these new hybrids.

Kerry

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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Replies to this topic
Subject Author Message Date ID
Reply message RE: Is the DSLR headed for extinction?
JBS101 Silver Member
04th Nov 2012
1
Reply message RE: Is the DSLR headed for extinction?
briantilley Moderator
04th Nov 2012
2
Reply message RE: Is the DSLR headed for extinction?
ecossephoto
05th Nov 2012
3
Reply message RE: Is the DSLR headed for extinction?
gkaiseril Gold Member
05th Nov 2012
4
Reply message RE: Is the DSLR headed for extinction?
nrothschild Silver Member
06th Nov 2012
5
Reply message RE: Is the DSLR headed for extinction?
Floridian Silver Member
06th Nov 2012
6
     Reply message RE: Is the DSLR headed for extinction?
PerroneFord Silver Member
06th Nov 2012
7
     Reply message RE: Is the DSLR headed for extinction?
krf Silver Member
07th Nov 2012
8
          Reply message RE: Is the DSLR headed for extinction?
rectangularimage Silver Member
09th Nov 2012
9
          Reply message RE: Is the DSLR headed for extinction?
gkaiseril Gold Member
27th Nov 2012
10
Reply message RE: Is the DSLR headed for extinction?
tekneektom Gold Member
27th Nov 2012
11
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MattNQ Silver Member
28th Nov 2012
12
Reply message RE: Is the DSLR headed for extinction?
ericbowles Moderator
28th Nov 2012
13
Reply message RE: Is the DSLR headed for extinction?
Martin Turner Moderator
28th Nov 2012
14

JBS101 Silver Member Nikonian since 20th Apr 2009Sun 04-Nov-12 08:05 PM
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#1. "RE: Is the DSLR headed for extinction?"
In response to Reply # 0


Canberra, AU
          

Kerry,

I think it is probable that you are correct in predicting a transition away from the traditional SLR camera. As the technology improves, I see no reason why it should not be possible to extract high quality stills from video, and indeed for some applications, it is probably already be happening.

I have done quite a bit of video in the past and am thinking about doing more. I will probably have to sell some of my current equipment to finance it, so the question of a dedicated camcorder vs something like a Nikon V1 will shortly be critical for me.

Leaving aside financial considerations, I think the need for a quiet, powerzoom lens will lead me away from my current stable of Nikon SLR zooms (F2.8 glass primarily) because, coupled with something like a D800, they still wont do for the type of video work I am thinking about.

Regards,

John

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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briantilley Moderator Deep knowledge of bodies and lens; high level photography skills Nikonian since 26th Jan 2003Sun 04-Nov-12 10:19 PM
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#2. "RE: Is the DSLR headed for extinction?"
In response to Reply # 0


Paignton, GB
          

Take a look at this quite lengthy discussion on the topic of whether/when the SLR might be overtaken by mirrorless technology

Brian
Welsh Nikonian

  

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ecossephoto Registered since 21st Jun 2012Mon 05-Nov-12 11:25 AM
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#3. "RE: Is the DSLR headed for extinction?"
In response to Reply # 2


GB
          

I certainly hope not.

For one reason, put a long or wide aperture lens on the mirrorless bodies and they don't appear to be well balanced.
The technology is there but the ergonomics aren't.

  

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gkaiseril Gold Member Nikonian since 28th Oct 2005Mon 05-Nov-12 03:04 PM
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#4. "RE: Is the DSLR headed for extinction?"
In response to Reply # 0
Mon 05-Nov-12 03:06 PM by gkaiseril

Chicago, US
          

Ask yourself "Are view cameras still being made?".

Maybe the majority of amateurs will not be using dSRL or SLR cameras but there will be some who will continue to and possibly they will be film.


George
My Nikonian Galleries

  

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nrothschild Silver Member Neil is an expert in several areas, including camera support Nikonian since 25th Jul 2004Tue 06-Nov-12 05:51 PM
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#5. "RE: Is the DSLR headed for extinction?"
In response to Reply # 0


US
          

I find it ironic that mirror-less cameras are gaining such interest at higher levels (advanced shooters) just as DSLR technology is reaching a "golden era" that promises reasonably inexpensive FX (partly delivered already). Getting back to FX has been a 10 year goal for so many, and as it is happening it is now declared irrelevant.

Maybe there will be a merging of the two technologies... mirror-less FX using the same lenses we are heavily invested in, giving more choices, not less choices.

_________________________________
Neil


my Nikonians gallery.

  

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Floridian Silver Member Nikonian since 11th Feb 2007Tue 06-Nov-12 07:09 PM
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#6. "RE: Is the DSLR headed for extinction?"
In response to Reply # 5
Tue 06-Nov-12 09:05 PM by Floridian

Tallahassee, Florida, US
          

>...Maybe there will be a merging of the two technologies...
>mirror-less FX using the same lenses we are heavily invested
>in, giving more choices, not less choices.

Sony is following that strategy (although Sony also has a new APS-C mirrorless too), but the others aren't. Pentax has a mirrorless camera that uses its APS-C sensor with its existing lenses. One attraction of the mirrorless cameras is that they are smaller and lighter, and manufacturers seem to want to build on that by including smaller sensors (like the Nikon 1 cameras). I'm interested in those options, but not a buyer yet.

It appears that manufacturers are following two different strategies in this market. Sony, Olympus, and Panasonic are creating models with DSLR-like features, for people who want full-featured cameras, but smaller. Nikon's strategy seems to be to make their 1 series like a step-up from a point-and-shoot. Especially in M4/3, there are some very nice (and expensive) lenses you can buy with the system.

I don't see the advantage of a mirrorless camera just for the sake of eliminating the mirror. But if it gives a smaller and lighter system, that's an advantage for some users. The M4/3 strategy is most appealing to me, and it seems to me would be to most Nikonians who are more interested in photography than your average camera buyer. But it will be interesting to see how this market plays out.

Randy

  

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PerroneFord Silver Member Nikonian since 07th Apr 2011Tue 06-Nov-12 11:28 PM
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#7. "RE: Is the DSLR headed for extinction?"
In response to Reply # 6


Tallahassee, US
          

>I don't see the advantage of a mirrorless camera just for the
>sake of eliminating the mirror.

Speed, silence, lack of vibration. The ability To shoot MUCH higher FPS is a boon to sports, wildlife, etc., photographers. The ability to go to a purely electronic shutter means all shutter press noise can be eliminated. Think of bird photographers, or folks shooting golf, or in courtrooms. Lack of mirror slap is awesome when you are shooting long focal lengths at reduced shutter speeds.

>But if it gives a smaller and
>lighter system, that's an advantage for some users.

Smaller I could care less about. Lighter would be quite nice.

------
Webpage: http://www.ptfphoto.com

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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krf Silver Member Charter MemberWed 07-Nov-12 12:21 AM
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#8. "RE: Is the DSLR headed for extinction?"
In response to Reply # 6


Gainesville, US
          


>I don't see the advantage of a mirrorless camera just for the
>sake of eliminating the mirror.

The are numerous advantages to a mirrorless camera:

--Faster frame rates
--No mirror vibration
--Quieter
--Fewer parts to malfunction or become misaligned

Nikon and Canon both addressed the limited SLR frame rate and sound issue with pellicle (semi transparent) fixed mirrors in years past. However, price and the light drop off inherent in semi transparent mirrors limited the appeal of those cameras.

Kerry

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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rectangularimage Silver Member Nikonian since 01st Oct 2009Fri 09-Nov-12 04:28 AM
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#9. "RE: Is the DSLR headed for extinction?"
In response to Reply # 8
Fri 09-Nov-12 04:28 AM by rectangularimage

San Diego, US
          

Other advantages of mirrorless:

--pre-chimping (with camera held up to eye)
--more info display possible in viewfinder
--focus peaking

...Mike

My website | My Nikonians gallery

  

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gkaiseril Gold Member Nikonian since 28th Oct 2005Tue 27-Nov-12 02:33 PM
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#10. "RE: Is the DSLR headed for extinction?"
In response to Reply # 8


Chicago, US
          

More electronics to go bad.

George
My Nikonian Galleries

  

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tekneektom Gold Member Nikonian since 18th Nov 2011Tue 27-Nov-12 08:33 PM
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#11. "RE: Is the DSLR headed for extinction?"
In response to Reply # 0


Land O Lakes, US
          

Given the fact that the SLR has been around since the 1930's it might be time for a change. Granted SLR technology has advanced, but keepng in mind that the camera is only a tool, maybe it's time for a change.

If new designs can deliver superior images at lower cost and are easier to use, more reliable and allow varying focal lengths via interchangeable lenses or electronic zooming, etc. Why not?

Tom

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MattNQ Silver Member Nikonian since 19th Nov 2012Wed 28-Nov-12 02:11 AM
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#12. "RE: Is the DSLR headed for extinction?"
In response to Reply # 11


AU
          

Personally I still prefer the optical viewfinder of DSLR. I find it heaps easier to manual focus than the LCD screen, especially working with really shallow DoF and in bright light.

But EVF technology seems to be improving rapidly now, so my argument is probably already dismissed by the advances made by the likes of Sony etc

Matt
----
"I started on a camel, and I will finish on a camel" Winston Churchill

Visit my Nikonians gallery.



My Smugmug Gallery
http://mattlarsen.smugmug.com/

:

  

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ericbowles Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge and high level skills in various areas, especially Landscape and Wildlife Photoghraphy Writer Ribbon awarded for for his article contributions to the community Nikonian since 25th Nov 2005Wed 28-Nov-12 05:36 PM
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#13. "RE: Is the DSLR headed for extinction?"
In response to Reply # 0


Atlanta, US
          

I'll be surprised if the current version of DSLR is around in 10-15 years. Sure we'll have some enthusiasts using older gear, but I expect major changes.

I see a number of places where mirrorless cameras already provide advantages. The low cost has already created huge innovation in what a camera looks like and how it is used. In addition to the phone and computer cameras, we now have cameras in iPads, and more creative places - like car bumpers, racing cars, and football helmets. Look at the GoPro devices to put still and video imaging in mobile devices.

If Nikon were to announce a 24 mp DX pro camera with existing lenses, a frame rate of 15 FPS, and a top of the line AF system in a mirrorless body, the demand would be huge.

I fully expect focus should be better in EVF / mirrorless designs. After all, contrast detect AF used for Live View is more accuracte and reliable already. Just use the EVF screen instead of an LCD. You have electronic zoom for precise focus when needed.

There have been other posts about the mass of the current camera - and I agree. Why not fill that mass with function - such as dual processors or quad processors and additional battery power?

Interchangeable lenses have a lot of value and will remain. Film has been replaced by a digital sensor. The mirror is next to go away and with it the DSLR becomes something else.


Eric Bowles
Nikonians Team
My Gallery
Workshops

Nikonians membership — my most important photographic investment, after the camera

  

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Martin Turner Moderator Expert professional PJ & PR photographer Nikonian since 19th Jun 2006Wed 28-Nov-12 07:54 PM
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#14. "RE: Is the DSLR headed for extinction?"
In response to Reply # 0


Bidford on Avon, GB
          

Ultimately, all technology will be surpassed.

I think the dSLR as such has a long shelf-life, because the advantages of a camera where you actually see what you are photographing are substantial. The only disadvantages are cost and size/mass. However, you need a bigger camera to provide stability, and it isn't the mirror mechanism which is the main cost driver on the higher end cameras.

What I think is coming to dSLRs from the existing world of digital compacts is
1) GPS built into all cameras
2) Wifi as standard
3) Onboard convolution filters
4) Recognising faces
5) Redundant pixels
6) Better rear screens
7) Image stabilisation

However, these will be implemented differently on high-end dSLRs.

1) GPS will come with support like the Photographer's Ephemeris, telling you things like how much sunlight you have left, when the golden hour is, and even whether you would get a better shot if you moved half a mile to the left

2) This would be prograde wifi with a full FTP server on board, so that you picture desk could poll your camera when you were out on assignment

3) Instead of filters that make it look like everyone is fat/thin/on Mars, the onboard filters would be a true deconvolution refocusing filter in real time, true tone-mapping in real time, and pixel dust removal at the point of taking the picture.

4) Facial recognition would automatically give priority to the leading eye where that was in the area of a face on the focusing dot

5) future dSLRs will be able to pixel dump to give an ISO/Resolution trade off when this was required. This would mean that one camera could do 64MP at 25,600 ISO, or 200,000 at 12MP with equivalent noise performance

6) calibrated rear screens which auto sense the light falling on them and adjust white balance accordingly

7) on-camera image stabilisation which works alongside lens Vibration Reduction

I also expect high end dSLRs to have break-out sound boxes for true phantom powered XLR inputs, sound being the current major weakness of camera video.

M A R T I N • T U R N E R
http://art.martinturner.org.uk
http://www.martinturner.org.uk

Nikonians membership: my most important photographic investment, after the camera

My Nikonians blog, Learning from the Portrait Masters, http://blog.nikonians.org/martin_turner/

  

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