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Forums Lobby MULTILINGUAL NIKONIANS English Café (Public) topic #774
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Subject: ""Vertical Limit" gaffe?" Previous topic | Next topic
shorbo Basic MemberTue 12-Dec-00 01:52 AM
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""Vertical Limit" gaffe?"


Redmond, US
          

Saw "Vertical Limit" last night - great movie, by the way, particularly if you're into adventure sports. But did I spot Peter Garrett, who's a National Geographic photographer in the movie, unloading a roll of Kodak Max film from his F5? Er... how many National Geographic photographers do you know who use consumer print film? I'm completely convinved it was Kodak Max and not T-Max - somebody else please tell me I was not hullucinating...

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BJNicholls Gold Member Awarded for his contributions to the community and the Resources Charter MemberTue 12-Dec-00 03:09 PM
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#1. "RE: "Vertical Limit" gaffe?"
In response to Reply # 0


Salt Lake City, US
          

The trailers show high speed self-arrests using ice axes that would severely dislocate shoulders, at the very least. And that flying leap? Yeah, that looks like a real climbing move. From what I've read, a minor gaffe with a Kodak prop is the least of this film's transgressions on realism, but that's Hollywood.

The fact that you could read the Kodak logo and type of film means Kodak paid $$$ for a product placement. Nikon probably did too. The placement is targeted at selling product, not necessarily accuracy.

The most blatant use of product placements I've seen recently is in the comically bad film "Mission to Mars". In the first five minutes there are half a dozen obnoxious shots featuring products and logos, including beer in little cartons like kid's juice drinks come in. Unfortunately, the film goes downhill from there...

BJ

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jrp Administrator JRP is one of the co-founders, has in-depth knowledge in various areas. Awarded for his contributions for the Resources Charter MemberWed 24-Jan-01 06:19 PM
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#2. "RE: "Vertical Limit" gaffe?"
In response to Reply # 1


San Pedro Garza García, MX
          

I finally had a chance to see the movie Vertical Limit.
Yes, many "inaccuracies" but it is an assistant (sherpa?) the one that pops out and drops to the ground a Kodak MAX roll, out of a Nikon F5 body(!), while the "photographer" is taking great shots of snow leopard cubs playing, with another F5 body and a monster lens, probably a 600mm f/4 or maybe longer.
Too bad they did not ask us, we could have probably recommended at least a Kodak Supra 800 roll. But then, the targeted consumer would have not known what was the subliminal message all about, eh?
Anyway, the film kept my interest on the edge of the chair either because of the action or because of the "French-Canadian" that ends in the lap of the protagonist. Amazing how a woman can master a universe with one single bite of her own lower lip.
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