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Forums Lobby MASTER YOUR VISION Micro, Macro & Close-up (Public) topic #93
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Subject: "How can I get a good lighting?" Previous topic | Next topic
ddouxchamps   つくば, JP  Basic Member Mon 30-Jul-01 02:42 PM
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"How can I get a good lighting?"



Hi all,

I tested my 105 micro with two rolls and I stumble on one problem: lighting. With 1:1 reproduction ratio I need of course a lot of light on moving subjects (or subjects on moving substrate ). The sun is a great source but it produced several 'white' areas, others remaining rather dark. Not uncommon phenomenon, but...

My question is: is there a trick to get a good 'macro' light for outdoors? A paper reflector maybe? Or must I avoid too sunny hours? Or under-expose -1IL?

Thanks for your hints,

Damien

Damien
A Belgian Nikonian in Japan

  

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Merlin     Basic Member Mon 30-Jul-01 03:06 PM
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#1. "RE: How can I get a good lighting?"
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Damien,

You're on the right track with all your suggestions: a paper reflector can be used to fill the shadows and prevent you overexposing the high spots; get out of the sun if you can... or wait for a cloud to soften the lighting for you or pick an overcast day.

Macro subjects are tricky, particularly if you're forced to shoot them outside under available light conditions. A small f-stop to give you enough depth of field causes a slow shutter speed, and you'd be surprised how much a flower moves around at 1/15th of a second even in a very light breeze.



Mike

http://www.geocities.com/heidoscop/

  

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jrp Administrator JRP is one of the co-founders, has in-depth knowledge in various areas. Awarded for his contributions for the Resources   San Pedro Garza García, MX  Charter Member Tue 31-Jul-01 11:22 PM
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#2. "RE: How can I get a good lighting?"
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An inexpensive alternative solution is shown here
Have a great time
JRP (Nikonian at the north-eastern Mexican desert) My profile
Previous photographic journey, before Nikonians: A Brief Love Story

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Forums Lobby MASTER YOUR VISION Micro, Macro & Close-up (Public) topic #93 Previous topic | Next topic