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Subject: "Macro exposure metering?" Previous topic | Next topic
Thuyker Basic MemberThu 13-Jun-02 03:02 AM
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"Macro exposure metering?"


Poway, US
          

Hi,

I'm going to be attempting macro photography for the first time pretty soon. I've been reading alot about diffraction, however, and have a few questions. I read that at an aperture of, say, f22, at a 1:1 reproduction ratio, you are actually getting a few stops less light, say f32 or even less. If using an off camera flash, a reflector, 60mm micro, and a F5, would I have to manually adjust the exposure? Or will TTL, etc. automatically adjust for this? This will be my first time using slide film, so I know I should bracket anyway to make sure, but I can't help but feel that I'm wasting film. My mom has over 50 different varieties of roses, and since I'm planning on taking pictures of all of them for her, bracketing would use up quite a bit of film! Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thank you!

  

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Replies to this topic
Subject Author Message Date ID
Reply message RE: Macro exposure metering?
TD
13th Jun 2002
3
Reply message RE: Macro exposure metering?
Thuyker
13th Jun 2002
4
Reply message RE: Macro exposure metering?
Ed
14th Jun 2002
5
Reply message RE: Macro exposure metering?
jrp Administrator
16th Jan 2008
Reply message RE: Macro exposure metering?
silverstone
13th Jun 2002
1
     Reply message RE: Macro exposure metering?
Philip
13th Jun 2002
2
Reply message RE: Macro exposure metering?
JimP
16th Jan 2008
Reply message Better flash example
JimP
16th Jan 2008
6

TD Basic MemberThu 13-Jun-02 11:41 AM
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#3. "RE: Macro exposure metering?"
In response to Reply # 0


Everett, US
          

Your TTL meter will compensate for any light loss at small apertures. Unlike the others, I often do bracket for macro photography when I'm using slide film. Of course, I'm only using a 'lowly' F-3 rather than a F-5. I will typically take the first picture at the recommended camera exposure and then bracket 2/3 stop each way. What I find is that the camera recommended exposure is correct 90% of the time, but with certain subjects or lighting conditions, one of the bracketed exposures works better. I keep notes of my exposures and with experience, I find out what compensation I need in a given situation and then adjust accordingly to minimize the amount of film wastage.

Tad

  

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Thuyker Basic MemberThu 13-Jun-02 03:25 PM
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#4. "RE: Macro exposure metering?"
In response to Reply # 0


Poway, US
          

Beautiful pictures and great advice everyone! Thank you for all the help!

  

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Ed Basic MemberFri 14-Jun-02 02:43 AM
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#5. "RE: Macro exposure metering?"
In response to Reply # 0


US
          

I too bracket, especially if I think I'm about to capture a priceless image. Nikon may get the exposure technically correct 99% of the time with its matrix metering but that does not necessarily mean it's the best exposure. With bracketing, you have a choice. Aside from "insurance", one other use of bracketing is, in case the slides look identical, then you have a ready-made duplicate!

Don't think you're wasting film. You'll be wasting more time if you have to re-do everything all over again. And then again, you may not get that nice light again that you got 2 days before.

In close focusing, the lens elements extend forward away from the film plane. There is some light loss but at normal distances, it's negligible. At macro shooting, the light loss is huge. But don't worry, the camera's electronics take that into account. If you were using a hand-held meter, you'd have to manually figure out how many f-stops you'd have to compensate.

I suggest using a tripod when shooting the flowers. And don't shoot flower closeups in bright sun (landscape shots are okay) unless you use a diffuser. I find my flower shots look the best in overcast light or with soft diffused lighting that yield soft shadows. If they're deep in the shade, use a warming filter such as Nikon A2 (81A).

Good luck, and post back some pics here.

Ed

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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jrp Administrator JRP is one of the co-founders, has in-depth knowledge in various areas. Awarded for his contributions for the Resources Charter MemberWed 16-Jan-08 01:41 PM
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"RE: Macro exposure metering?"


San Pedro Garza García, MX
          

I have not bracketed a single time in over 30 years, ever since I got my first Nikon camera with a meter. Trust it. The F5 has the only meter on earth that can see color today. Below a most recent sample.

Have a great time
JRP (Founder & Administrator. Nikonian at the north-eastern Mexican desert) Gallery, Brief Love Story, The Team
Join the Silver, Gold and Platinum members that help this happen; upgrade. Join your personal web site to the Nikonians WebRing
Make sure you check our workshops at The Nikonians Academy and the product catalog of the Photo Pro Shop

Attachment #1, (jpg file)

  

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silverstone Registered since 13th May 2002Thu 13-Jun-02 05:21 AM
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#1. "RE: Macro exposure metering?"
In response to Reply # 0


GB
          

Hi Thuyker,
like JRP I have never used the bracket facility on my F5 and with the subjects you will be photographing I think it's unlikely that you will need it either. If you are using slide film for the first time why not do a test run first. If you make notes about each exposure you can check the results before you start your project.

I would seriously suggest you read up on the subject and the best book I have seen is "The complete guide to close up & macro photography" by Paul Harcourt Davies. Published in England by David & Charles. ISBN No. 0-7153-0800-9.HIGHLY RECOMMENDED.

Your set up should give great results and, unless you stop your lens down to its minimum, you are unlikely to see any diffraction.
This normally occurs at high magnifications (greater than 1:1) and will be difficult to see as The 60mm Nikkor is a superb lens.

  

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Philip Basic MemberThu 13-Jun-02 09:28 AM
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#2. "RE: Macro exposure metering?"
In response to Reply # 1


BE
          

The same here, I also never used bracketing.

The amount of light you loose 'in the lens', while focussing at 1:1 won't be a problem, as your camera measures light through the lens.

Thuyker, I suppose you won't need 1:1 to photograph roses? Unless you're talking about Bonsai roses

Regards,
Philip

My website
My galleries

  

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JimP Registered since 24th Apr 2002Wed 16-Jan-08 01:41 PM
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"RE: Macro exposure metering?"


Southlake, US
          

Thuyker,
Yes, you are right about the effective aperture being less than the aperture indicated on the lens. I use a Nikon 105 2.8 Micro which has an indicated f32 on the lens but at 1:1 it reads f51 on my F100. The exposure is calculated correctly by the camera body for ambient lighting and the TTL does work for those flashes that can be controlled that way. I use 2 - SB28 speedlights off camera for macro work connected by an SC-17 to the first and and SC-18 to the second. The attached picture was taken at close to 1:1 on Kodak Supra400 - f45 or so as read from the body - shutter 1/250. This is a field pansy that is less than 1/2 inch high.

Attachment #1, (jpg file)

  

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JimP Registered since 24th Apr 2002Wed 16-Jan-08 01:41 PM
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#6. "Better flash example"
In response to Reply # 0


Southlake, US
          

Thought I would post a better example of macro flash controlling the background. Technical: Nikon F-100, Nikon 105mm 2.8 Micro, aperture f32, shutter 1/250, manual, 2 Nikon SB-28 speedlights, Kodak Supra400 film. Ambient light exposure would have been f16 @ 1/250.

Attachment #1, (jpg file)

  

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