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Forums Lobby MASTER YOUR VISION - BY SPECIALTY Wildlife (Public) topic #151007
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Subject: "What is your primary body for wildlife photography?" Previous topic | Next topic
Jim Pearce Silver Member Nikonian since 02nd Mar 2004Fri 18-Jan-13 02:26 AM
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"Poll question: What is your primary body for wildlife photography?"


Grimsby, CA
          

These are confusing times for wildlife photographers. Every available (new or used) Nikon body seems to have strengths and weaknesses. I'm just curious how the numbers break down here. Personally I'm waiting for a decision on Nikon's top of line DX camera before moving on from the D300 and D300s, but I'm painfully aware of their limitations - especially DR.

Poll result (90 votes)
D300/s (33 votes)Vote
D7000 (19 votes)Vote
D3/D700 (5 votes)Vote
D3s (7 votes)Vote
D4 (11 votes)Vote
D800/E (15 votes)Vote

  

  

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Replies to this topic
Subject Author Message Date ID
Reply message RE: What is your primary body for wildlife photography?
massulo Gold Member Donor Ribbon awarded for his generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014
18th Jan 2013
1
Reply message RE: What is your primary body for wildlife photography?
mkbee1 Silver Member
18th Jan 2013
2
Reply message Hmm...sounds like the superb 400mm f3.5 to me...
Jim Pearce Silver Member
19th Jan 2013
5
Reply message RE: What is your primary body for wildlife photography?
NatureDon Silver Member
18th Jan 2013
3
Reply message RE: What is your primary body for wildlife photography?
Gene Duprey
16th Feb 2013
16
Reply message RE: What is your primary body for wildlife photography?
danshep Silver Member
19th Jan 2013
4
Reply message RE: What is your primary body for wildlife photography?
slopoki1 Silver Member Laureate Ribbon awarded for winning in the Best of Nikonians 2013 images Photo Contest
20th Jan 2013
6
Reply message RE: What is your primary body for wildlife photography?
treadwl Silver Member
20th Jan 2013
7
     Reply message Rick, Larry...
Jim Pearce Silver Member
22nd Jan 2013
8
          Reply message Nikon body for birds/wildlife
Sula440
22nd Jan 2013
9
Reply message RE: What is your primary body for wildlife photography?
cchoc Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge and high level skills in various areas, most notably in Landscape Photography
23rd Jan 2013
10
Reply message RE: What is your primary body for wildlife photography?
nutcracker Gold Member
23rd Jan 2013
11
     Reply message Yeah, only 6 choices...
Jim Pearce Silver Member
23rd Jan 2013
12
     Reply message RE: What is your primary body for wildlife photography?
KnightPhoto Gold Member
02nd Feb 2013
13
          Reply message Choosing between speed and reach sucks!
Jim Pearce Silver Member
02nd Feb 2013
14
          Reply message E: What is your primary body for wildlife photography?
NatureDon Silver Member
02nd Feb 2013
15
               Reply message RE: E: What is your primary body for wildlife photograp...
Brian_S
20th Feb 2013
17
Reply message RE: What is your primary body for wildlife photography?
ericbowles Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge and high level skills in various areas, especially Landscape and Wildlife Photoghraphy Writer Ribbon awarded for for his article contributions to the community
20th Feb 2013
18
Reply message RE: What is your primary body for wildlife photography?
Jim Pearce Silver Member
20th Feb 2013
19

massulo Gold Member Donor Ribbon awarded for his generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Nikonian since 07th May 2002Fri 18-Jan-13 02:45 PM
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#1. "RE: What is your primary body for wildlife photography?"
In response to Reply # 0
Fri 18-Jan-13 02:46 PM by massulo

Tampa/Lutz, US
          

Im waiting for a D400, as my lenses have gotten better so has my acquisition rate and performance..



Preston-(The Tampa Nikonian)..D610


-One does not know what one is missing - until you miss it..



My Website

  

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mkbee1 Silver Member Nikonian since 26th Nov 2012Fri 18-Jan-13 05:21 PM
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#2. "RE: What is your primary body for wildlife photography?"
In response to Reply # 0
Fri 18-Jan-13 05:51 PM by mkbee1

West Valley, US
          

My primary body is in pretty good shape for its age...73 years old, abut 6 feet tall, 215 pounds, (down from 250 just a few short years ago)and wears bifocals. Ohhhh, woops...you meant CAMERA body?

In my never-humble opinion, ANY of the Nikon digital bodies produced in the last dozen or more years will do excellently for wildlife photography. Some have fewer bells and whistles than others, but all you need for exellent photography of any kind is there!

Now...lenses...that is where it all comes down to.

Let me make a rather sweeping statement. ANY Nikon lens, unless it has had the merrie Aitch beat out of it, will be excellent for wildlife, (Parties or the kind with a leg at each corner!) with the nod given to telephotos. The "consumer" 200 mms will do much more than most folks give them credit for. F/2.8 is not irrelevant, but with adjustable ISO, F3.5-4.5 is not much of a handicap,if any at all!

Newer features just make it more convenient to use. I met a guy at Yellowstone Park, who was the photographer of a pro football team for 10-15 years,and he was using his old 400 mm (F/4.5?) manual-focus lens on some flavor of DSLR body.

Would I love to own one of the "big guns",like the 300mm F/4, 70-200 f/2.8, or the new f/4 version? O MY Yes! But, my 20-year old 70-210 AF did marvelously well until I got the 70-300VR, which also does beautifully.

Funniest thing...I find that I use it at 200mm or less most of the time...hmmmm...maybe a lesson in there, somewhere, if I could only figure out what it is.

It is a Fine and Pleasant Madness

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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Jim Pearce Silver Member Nikonian since 02nd Mar 2004Sat 19-Jan-13 12:56 AM
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#5. "Hmm...sounds like the superb 400mm f3.5 to me..."
In response to Reply # 2


Grimsby, CA
          

That isn't just any Nikon lens. And no, not just any Nikon lens will do.

Jim

  

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NatureDon Silver Member Nikonian since 08th Nov 2007Fri 18-Jan-13 06:16 PM
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#3. "RE: What is your primary body for wildlife photography?"
In response to Reply # 0
Fri 18-Jan-13 06:56 PM by NatureDon

US
          

Jim,

Thank you for posing this question.

I sold my D300S and committed to the D800 to avoid carrying two camera bodies when I am out with potential for wildlife and/or landscape photos. Also, I have missed some great photo opportunities when wildlife suddenly appeared, which they tend to do, but too close for my DX / telephoto combo in hand.

My thoughts thus far with regard to bird photography...I like the D800 better for including more environment given the same lens and distance to subject. However, I am not convinced about the detail in bird feathers when I get in tight. For me, I have not consistently matched the lovely detail in bird feathers that I could routinely expect with my D300S.

For now, I am still working on making the D800 my camera body of choice for birds, but the jury is still out in my mind.

I would like to hear more from those using the D800(E) for birds. How pleased are folks with the photos they are capturing and particularly what about the feather detail on tight photos. Sans all the discussion about potential for rare occurrences of moire. What about the 99.9% of the photos that don't have it? How pleased are folks with this camera for wildlife, particularly birds?

Regards,
Don


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Gene Duprey Registered since 08th Feb 2013Sat 16-Feb-13 03:29 AM
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#16. "RE: What is your primary body for wildlife photography?"
In response to Reply # 3


Cedar Rapids, US
          

>Jim,
>
>Thank you for posing this question.
>
>I sold my D300S and committed to the D800 to avoid carrying
>two camera bodies when I am out with potential for wildlife
>and/or landscape photos. Also, I have missed some great photo
>opportunities when wildlife suddenly appeared, which they tend
>to do, but too close for my DX / telephoto combo in hand.
>
>My thoughts thus far with regard to bird photography...I like
>the D800 better for including more environment given the same
>lens and distance to subject. However, I am not convinced
>about the detail in bird feathers when I get in tight. For
>me, I have not consistently matched the lovely detail in bird
>feathers that I could routinely expect with my D300S.
>
>For now, I am still working on making the D800 my camera body
>of choice for birds, but the jury is still out in my mind.
>
>I would like to hear more from those using the D800(E) for
>birds. How pleased are folks with the photos they are
>capturing and particularly what about the feather detail on
>tight photos. Sans all the discussion about potential for
>rare occurrences of moire. What about the 99.9% of the photos
>that don't have it? How pleased are folks with this camera
>for wildlife, particularly birds?
>
>Regards,
>Don
>
>
>

Visit
>my
>Nikonians gallery>.



Jim,
I would not worry about moire with the D800E. I have been using the Leica M8 rangefinder for years, with out the moire filter, and have only seen maybe 2% of my images where moire was seen.

Cheers,
Gene

  

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danshep Silver Member Charter MemberSat 19-Jan-13 12:42 AM
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#4. "RE: What is your primary body for wildlife photography?"
In response to Reply # 0


Olympia, US
          


I actually also have a D2h in addition to the D700 I voted for.

Frames per second are important to me. Also higher ISO. I need high SS and want a camera, which will adapt to difficult light.




"Today is the tomorrow that yesterday you spent money like there was no"

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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slopoki1 Silver Member Laureate Ribbon awarded for winning in the Best of Nikonians 2013 images Photo Contest Nikonian since 13th Jun 2012Sun 20-Jan-13 12:48 AM
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#6. "RE: What is your primary body for wildlife photography?"
In response to Reply # 0


Homestead, US
          

I've been using D300's for the last 4 yrs and have had no problems or complaints. I'm happy using them and will continue until the shutters go out. Then I'll get the upgrade, whatever that may be.
Rick
http://www.slopoki1.com/Nature

Visit my Nikonians gallery.



Visit
http://www.slopoki1.com/Nature

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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treadwl Silver Member Nikonian since 10th Feb 2009Sun 20-Jan-13 05:45 PM
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#7. "RE: What is your primary body for wildlife photography?"
In response to Reply # 6


Sunrise, US
          

I've been seriously shooting birds now for about 3 years. I use a d300s body and select from three lenses: My primary is the 200-400 f4 vr, second choice is my trusty 300mm f4 prime and I have a 70-200 F2.8 if I want to capture more environmental views. I've found that the frames per second works for birds in flight (especially in keeping wings from blocking the eye) and the images are clean, sharp and detailed even at 800 to 1250 ISO. In comparing my images to others I've seen I am satisfied with my results. Like slopoki noted, I'll shoot the 300s until the shutter dies and then worry about an upgrade.

I was treated to the use of a d800 one weekend and did not see enough improvement to warrant a purchase. My 300s and I are best buds, so far the force has been with us.

Larry

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Visit my Nikonians gallery.

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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Jim Pearce Silver Member Nikonian since 02nd Mar 2004Tue 22-Jan-13 02:39 AM
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#8. "Rick, Larry..."
In response to Reply # 7


Grimsby, CA
          

Every camera performs better in Florida.

Jim

  

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Sula440 Registered since 05th Feb 2008Tue 22-Jan-13 05:27 AM
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#9. "Nikon body for birds/wildlife"
In response to Reply # 8


Columbus, US
          

I used a D300 for 4 years and loved it. Upgraded to a D700 which I have used extensively for all manner of bird/landscape/macro photography. Just picked up a D800E a few weeks ago and took a break from the Ohio winter to run around South Florida and Merritt Island for a few days to try out the new body. Bottom line: D800E performed spectacularly on landscapes/reflections/sunsets etc. The birds and wildlife did not show any consistent remarkable differences on up tight shots over the D700, but did improve the distance shots. The ability to crop up to 70-90% with the D800E and produce really sharp images is appealing. I generally don't like to crop much unless I have to, but the most I am comfortable with using images from the D700 is 40-50%. I have to agree with Jim that most any camera I have used in Florida and South Texas seems to perform better. Sure would love to have some of that great light in Ohio year round! In case anyone is wondering, of the 102 images I kept of birds from my Florida shoot with the D800E, only 2 showed any moire of consequence, and only one of a Lesser Scaup (head) was enough to fret over-not nearly as bad as I had feared. I attached a couple shots to compare: A winter male Cape May Warbler and Red-tailed Hawk profile with the D700 to compare with a Burrowing Owl and an Ovenbird (the other moire-afflicted shot) from my Florida trip two weeks ago with the D800E. I probably wouldn't have purchased the D800E just to chase birds, but I can't wait to get on some waterfalls, night skies and landscapes with it.























Sula440

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Attachment #1, (jpg file)
Attachment #2, (jpg file)
Attachment #3, (jpg file)
Attachment #4, (jpg file)

  

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cchoc Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge and high level skills in various areas, most notably in Landscape Photography Charter MemberWed 23-Jan-13 03:37 PM
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#10. "RE: What is your primary body for wildlife photography?"
In response to Reply # 0


Marietta, US
          

I voted D3s, but I have just gotten a D800E and haven't had the opportunity to shoot wildlife with it. I also used my D700 a lot for wildlife.

Charlie...
stalking light

Nikonians Team Member

  

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nutcracker Gold Member Nikonian since 21st Dec 2005Wed 23-Jan-13 10:09 PM
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#11. "RE: What is your primary body for wildlife photography?"
In response to Reply # 10


Dublin, IE
          

No room for D3X ?????
In decent light, and not too rapid unpredictable movements such as some small birds, D3X remains my favourite.
Dull light and twitchy restless birds, D4 is the king.
I prefer the bigger body on big lenses to the D200/300 and D700 series.
Easier for me to avoid camera motion blur with greater equipment mass.

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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Jim Pearce Silver Member Nikonian since 02nd Mar 2004Wed 23-Jan-13 11:54 PM
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#12. "Yeah, only 6 choices..."
In response to Reply # 11


Grimsby, CA
          

I should have run a secondary poll to include D600, D3X and "any other DX body"; or at least said "If your camera isn't listed please post.".

Jim

  

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KnightPhoto Gold Member Nikonian since 18th Dec 2006Sat 02-Feb-13 03:35 AM
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#13. "RE: What is your primary body for wildlife photography?"
In response to Reply # 11


Alberta, CA
          

I voted D4 for its speed, un-fillable buffer, AF quickness, and low light ability but it has me wishing for an 800mm to go with it. That's why I'm also waiting for a D400.

I also have been shooting my D800E and last weekend on BIF it came home with the better images, the detail is incredible assuming one can fill the frame greater than a DX camera. It's a real knock-down drag out battle between the D4/D800 cameras and my perceived leader keeps changing hands. Am trying out the new D4 firmware tomorrow.

Best regards, SteveK

'A camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera.' -- Dorothea Lange
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Jim Pearce Silver Member Nikonian since 02nd Mar 2004Sat 02-Feb-13 04:03 AM
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#14. "Choosing between speed and reach sucks!"
In response to Reply # 13


Grimsby, CA
          

If I went FX with Nikon it would have to be the D4/500 f4 VR & 800 f5.6 combination. That would cover the FX equivalents of my favourite focal lengths on DX - 300mm, 420mm, 500mm and 700mm. Needless to say, the cost would be staggering!

Jim

  

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NatureDon Silver Member Nikonian since 08th Nov 2007Sat 02-Feb-13 02:01 PM
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#15. "E: What is your primary body for wildlife photography?"
In response to Reply # 13


US
          

Since my post above on Jan 18, I made two changes...replaced the D800 with D800E, and, prior to taking delivery of the D800E, had Nikon go over it and my 500mm f/4 VR separately and tuned together.

Initial results are barely off the presses. Had just a few hours each day last weekend to try some photography around feeders here at home. As Steve noted, the detail has the potential to be incredible, especially when shooting tight near the minimum focus distance.

I plan to stick with the D800E at least until next winter and will see what I learn from now till then. My initial impressions with songbirds are favorable. I will note that if feather detail is achieved, moire is frequently there if viewed at 1:1 in Lightroom. Looking forward to seeing a range of applications throughout 2013.

Don

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Brian_S Registered since 28th Jan 2011Wed 20-Feb-13 05:43 AM
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#17. "RE: E: What is your primary body for wildlife photography?"
In response to Reply # 15
Wed 20-Feb-13 05:44 AM by Brian_S

Thunder Bay, CA
          

D3s, i just love that body, for anything

D800 i have a love/hate relationship with and when it comes to birds, and especially tracking bif's its more a hate relationship

since i got the D3s and experienced its speed of acquiring focus compared to my D300s, well it now just sits on the shelf, been trying to sell it but haven't even had not one bit of interest in it, so i'll keep it versus giving it away, or i may trade it towards a 14-24

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ericbowles Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge and high level skills in various areas, especially Landscape and Wildlife Photoghraphy Writer Ribbon awarded for for his article contributions to the community Nikonian since 25th Nov 2005Wed 20-Feb-13 11:42 AM
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#18. "RE: What is your primary body for wildlife photography?"
In response to Reply # 0


Atlanta, US
          

My first 3000 frames with the D800E were at the St. Augustine Alligator Farm last year. I had a chance to thoroughly test the camera with a number of lenses for birds.

The D800E detail for bird feathers is simply stunning when used with my 600 f/4 VR. Even at 100% zoom I see extreme detail. More important with FX is the ability to render nice smooth backgrounds. Comparing the D800E and cropping to the proportions of the D7000 is still no contest - the D800E has far more detail. This makes me wonder whether there is really an advantage to a 24 MP DX body unless it also has a high resolution processor - and that would increase noise.

What I also found was the D800E reveals any shortcoming in your lenses. I could use the 600 f/4 bare, but when I added teleconverters I immediately see a difference. At normal viewing the difference is not really a drawback, but you don't get the consistency of stunning sharpness that I get with the bare lens. So I use a teleconverter if I need it but not routinely. The 300 f/4 is similarly sharp but falls off with a teleconverter. And my 200-400 is good, but not quite stunning in terms of sharpness. None of this is a surprise. With some time to work out which apertures provide optimum sharpness.

I have not found a situation where any of my current DX bodies outperform my D800E - even cropped to DX. And the same is true for CX using the V1 - the 2.7 crop does not outperform cropping the D800E. And I'm a bit disappointed that the DX anc CX uncropped images are not sharper. Now we are truly splitting hairs - but the D800E can better resolve the hair being split.

I'm not sure of the reason DX and CX cannot provide D800E resolution. I'm sure there are different optimum apertures with each camera and I may not have hit the sweetest spot. And my DX and Cx cameras have stronger anti-aliasing filters. In addition, I suspect there is a little more noise reduction applied in the processor even when in camera NR is off. Canon uses that approach to achieve high ISO performance. I've been tempted to have the AA filter removed from my D7000 to see if that makes a difference.

When if comes to AF system performance, it seems that there is a clear advantage to more expensive and newer cameras. The D4 has the best AF performance, and the D3 and D3s are similarly excellent. The D800/800E is very close behind and the best of the X00 bodies. There is a drop off with the D600 but it is still better than the D300. And there is a further drop off with the D7000. All of these cameras are good, but for subjects that are demanding on AF systems there is a difference.

If you shoot bursts, the D7000 seems to fire faster than any of my other cameras. On paper the D800 should be close, but the shutter release is more sensitive on the D7000 and I find I can get a faster release. The D4 and D3/D3s are still the top cameras for frame rate and release.

These are all general observations and don't have the rigor to be called tests. I'm sure others will have a different experience with different subjects and camera/lens combinations.


Eric Bowles
Nikonians Team
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Nikonians membership — my most important photographic investment, after the camera

  

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Jim Pearce Silver Member Nikonian since 02nd Mar 2004Wed 20-Feb-13 02:50 PM
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#19. "RE: What is your primary body for wildlife photography?"
In response to Reply # 18


Grimsby, CA
          

Well, Bill Claff's numbers support your observation Eric - the D800E cropped to DX is currently the best DX sensor. Perhaps the D5200 will be very close. And there's no doubt about the 600 VR's resolving power - although the 800 f5.6 may be the new king. Happily my five year old D300 and 16 year old 500 f4 AF-S are still working and I can sit on the sidelines until Nikon put all of their cards on the table.

Jim

  

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Forums Lobby MASTER YOUR VISION - BY SPECIALTY Wildlife (Public) topic #151007 Previous topic | Next topic