Go to a  "printer friendly" view of this message which allow an easy print Printer-friendly copy Go to the page which allows you to send this topic link and a message to a friend Email this topic to a friend
Forums Lobby MASTER YOUR TOOLS - Hardware & Software Nikon Speedlights & Lighting topic #819
View in linear mode

Subject: "Concert-photography with SB-28" Previous topic | Next topic
Jonny_Lindh Basic MemberMon 17-Dec-01 07:33 PM
2 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
"Concert-photography with SB-28"



          

I often photograph concerts, and have recently begun using the Sb-28 with my F-90x, but still haven´t been able to get good overall results. Using the TTL-setting is not an option, since a spotlight from stage easily makes the picture underexposed, and using the manual setting just isn´t possible. To much time adjusting the distance-scale on the flash... My question, is there a setting on this flash were the flash only uses the distance from camera to subject-information and the chosen aperture on the camera when calculating for the right flash exposure? I want to be able to expose the "background" whatever way I want, without worrying about the flash being tricked by bright (or sometimes dim) stagelight...

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

Replies to this topic
Subject Author Message Date ID
Reply message RE: Concert-photography with SB-28
jrp Administrator
17th Dec 2001
1
Reply message RE: Concert-photography with SB-28
WingSpan
18th Dec 2001
2
Reply message RE: Concert-photography with SB-28
Jonny_Lindh
18th Dec 2001
3
     Reply message RE: Concert-photography with SB-28
benjaminhaworth
18th Dec 2001
4
     Reply message RE: Concert-photography with SB-28
JM
18th Dec 2001
5
Reply message RE: Concert-photography with SB-28
lstavast
02nd Feb 2002
6

jrp Administrator JRP is one of the co-founders, has in-depth knowledge in various areas. Awarded for his contributions for the Resources Charter MemberMon 17-Dec-01 11:10 PM
33936 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#1. "RE: Concert-photography with SB-28"
In response to Reply # 0


San Pedro Garza García, MX
          

of the concert stage in perfect exposure since it is subjected to high contrasting spotlights.
In the situation you described, yes, you can have the background well exposed but the area lit by the spotlight will be overexposed.
I had very good results with a long tele lens, allowing me to choose a small area; unless the stage is uniformly lit, which seldom is.

Have a great time
JRP (Founder & Administrator. Nikonian at the north-eastern Mexican desert) Gallery, Brief Love Story, The Team
Join the Silver, Gold and Platinum members that help this happen; upgrade. Join your personal web site to the Nikonians WebRing
Make sure you check our workshops at The Nikonians Academy and the product catalog of the Photo Pro Shop

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

WingSpan Basic MemberTue 18-Dec-01 12:36 AM
674 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#2. "RE: Concert-photography with SB-28"
In response to Reply # 0


Gainesville, US
          

Take a look at this web site. It gives a ton of useful information to solve exactly the problems you are dealing with. (And it's worth looking at just for the really great concert photos!)

http://www.photo.net/photo/canon/mirarchi/concert/concer_i.htm

WingSpan

Richard

My Photo Gallery

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

    
Jonny_Lindh Basic MemberTue 18-Dec-01 10:06 AM
2 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#3. "RE: Concert-photography with SB-28"
In response to Reply # 2



          

I´ve read this article before, and true, it has lots of tips usefull for me, but it really doesn´t cover the area of flash-photography that much. My question is quite simple really; Is there a setting on the flash (other than the fully manual) where it doesn´t measure the light at all, but only takes the aperture chosen and distance to subject in consideration? Thanks

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

        
benjaminhaworth Basic MemberTue 18-Dec-01 08:15 PM
82 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#4. "RE: Concert-photography with SB-28"
In response to Reply # 3


Clitheroe, GB
          

Set the flash to f8 (if with ASA 100 film). Set the F80 to Aperture Priority mode and put it on f8. Set the flash mode (using the camera's flash mode button) to 'slow-sync'. This will give a longish exposure to absorb the ambient lighting (albeit a bit wobbly due to camera shake) and the burst of flash will be sufficient to illuminate and 'freeze' the subject sharply without over-exposing it. Try to keep fairly still during the longish exposure for minimal wobbly light streaking or move lots if you want exciting mega-wobbly streaky light trails flying everywhere

!!This only works when you are fairly near the subject (no further than 15 feet ideally) and if you like a bit of atmospheric blurry bits and streaky light effects (but with a well exposed and sharp main subject) - like pics in rock music magazines!!

Forget your equipment & use your imagination

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

        
JM Registered since 01st Mar 2007Tue 18-Dec-01 09:01 PM
2468 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#5. "RE: Concert-photography with SB-28"
In response to Reply # 3


US
          

If I understand your request correctly what you need is what is called auto flash usually done with a sensor for the flash only. The old Vivitar 283 has a sensor on it (that can be remotely mounted on the camera while flash is off camera to get proper light at the film.
This method of control might also be fooled if 'blinded' by a head-on spot.
Jeff Markus

JM
The Chicagoan

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

lstavast Awarded for his contributions to the Resources Registered since 01st Jan 2003Sat 02-Feb-02 09:52 PM
1071 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#6. "RE: Concert-photography with SB-28"
In response to Reply # 0


Allen, US
          

If I'm totally in the weeds, someone tell me - I genuinely have tried to do exactly what I think this poster wanted and can't figure it out.

In my perfect world < and I think this fits poster's request>, in the flash DISTANCE mode < I'm inventing here - work with me > the camera with a distance savy lens (D) could know exactly where you focused & the know distance, pass that distance data to the flash - which would then put out the exact right amount of flash based on just that distance - and do a dump with no additional TTL style readback games. It wouldn't care what was reflected back - it would work on GN-distance-fstop style info soley, and only tell you if it was too close or too far.

RIGHT ?

Doesn't exist in that pure fashion from my experience with the SB-28

You can however have the SB-28 flash work on its own using the 'A' mode - which is non-ttl since the flash's sensor does it all. This is the way the first thyristor flashes worked, you put in an f-stop it delivered power based on what got reflected back to it on the front of the flash. Still available at this late date.

The 'A'mode Might work at a concert if the first thing it's sensor angle saw was the performer you wanted lit, if something non-essential closer is "seen" reflecting - you're underexposed...

I know on an f100 you can have SPOT metering work in TTL mode - and it does pretty well actually and might work for you - I do not know the 90 and if it even has that option. You could get pretty creative with the spots (5 of them) on an F100 and cover a concert with a little concentration.

The bigger the subject in the viewfinder, the easier it is to use the CW metering and ttl (with maybe some compensation in camera or flash).

While I love the sb-28 and matrix for fill and general light-it-up stuff - I was disappointed to find that the seemingly simple intelligence to do PURE distance gather and dumping of the flash for it wasn't there in the current generation of cameras. < I came back after 20 years not being current >

And I wish you well in your concert endeavors.

And while I'm on a roll... there are 2 other things I can't believe don't exist in equipment on the market now either , although not related to flashes -

1) auto-hyperfocal calculation on the body with a D lens (I give an f-stop and it pops to that max hyperfocal focus point - no charts involved....)
2) Multi-point-DOF - I mark 2 or more focus points in sequence and it chooses an f-stop and sets the lens focus point for it to all be in acceptable focus. I'd use this all the time... to fix situations where people/things are in different planes for example. It would make controlling background/foreground noise much more simple.

But - hey - Life's still grand and we got a lot of blessings - like this website to enjoy & learn from.


Regards,
Lyle Stavast



Lyle

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

Forums Lobby MASTER YOUR TOOLS - Hardware & Software Nikon Speedlights & Lighting topic #819 Previous topic | Next topic


Take the Nikonians Tour and learn more about being a Nikonian Wiki /FAQ /Help Listen to our MP3 photography radio channels Find anything on Nikon and imaging technology - fast!

Copyright © Nikonians 2000, 2014
All Rights Reserved

Nikonians®, NikoScope® and NikoniansAcademy™ are trademarks owned by Nikonians.org.
Nikon®, Nikonos® and Nikkor® are registered trademarks of Nikon Corporation.