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Forums Lobby MASTER YOUR TOOLS - Hardware & Software Nikon Speedlights & Lighting topic #62119
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Subject: "Flash Synch Speed " Previous topic | Next topic
Sportymonk Registered since 16th Jul 2007Sun 08-Sep-13 01:36 AM
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"Flash Synch Speed "


Rocky Mount, US
          

Read through several posts but didn't see the question I am look ing to resolve.

- Is there a reason to set the Flash Synch Speed to LESS THAN 1/250? I understand that FSS is the fastest the camera can use unless you go to FP mode but is there any reason to set it lower than 1/250 and just leave it there?

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Replies to this topic
Subject Author Message Date ID
Reply message RE: Flash Synch Speed
luckyphoto Silver Member
08th Sep 2013
1
Reply message RE: Flash Synch Speed
jbloom Gold Member
09th Sep 2013
2
Reply message RE: Flash Synch Speed
aolander Silver Member
09th Sep 2013
3
Reply message RE: Flash Synch Speed
MEMcD Moderator
11th Sep 2013
4
Reply message RE: Flash Synch Speed
bens0472
13th Sep 2013
5

luckyphoto Silver Member Nikonian since 27th Dec 2010Sun 08-Sep-13 11:39 AM
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#1. "RE: Flash Synch Speed "
In response to Reply # 0


Port Charlotte, US
          

Here's an article by Neil van Niekerk that discusses maximum flash synch speed that may help.

http://neilvn.com/tangents/maximum-flash-sync-speed-nikon-sb-900-sb-910-speedlight/

Larry

"Red is gray and yellow white, but we decide which is right
....and which is an illusion"

Moody Blues - Nights in White Satin

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jbloom Gold Member Awarded for the continuous and generous sharing of his high level expertise and his always encouraging comments in several forums. Nikonian since 15th Jul 2004Mon 09-Sep-13 04:38 PM
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#2. "RE: Flash Synch Speed "
In response to Reply # 0


Wethersfield, US
          

The only reason I know of is that at the far end of the shutter-speed settings (past the BULB setting) is an x-sync setting. When selecting SS, you can choose that to automatically set the shutter to sync speed, and that value is controlled by the menu setting. Of course, you can also just set the shutter speed to the value you want, so how useful this feature is I'm not sure. I use it sometimes because if I accidentally bump the SS dial and change the SS, I'll know it immediately.

-- Jon
Wethersfield, CT, USA
Connecticut High School Sports Photos

  

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aolander Silver Member Nikonian since 15th Sep 2006Mon 09-Sep-13 04:47 PM
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#3. "RE: Flash Synch Speed "
In response to Reply # 0


Nevis, US
          

The shutter speed determines what the ambient background exposure will be. Indoors, for example, if you want a very dark or black background, set the shutter speed to the max. If you want the background to be visible, set a slower shutter speed.

Alan

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MEMcD Moderator In depth knowledge in various areas Nikonian since 24th Dec 2007Wed 11-Sep-13 01:53 PM
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#4. "RE: Flash Synch Speed "
In response to Reply # 0


US
          

Hi Lee,

If you are using certain brands of RF triggers that require using a shutter speed one or two steps slower than the maximum sync speed in order to sync correctly.

When you want the ambient light to brighten the background, "dragging the shutter" (using a slower shutter speed) is the way to go.

Best Regards,
Marty

  

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bens0472 Basic MemberFri 13-Sep-13 09:02 PM
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#5. "RE: Flash Synch Speed "
In response to Reply # 0


Roswell, US
          

Hi Lee,

I'm speculating, but I suspect that this feature is provided so that you can, effectively, set an upper limit on shutter speed so if you're using strobes with slower t.1 or t.5 times and need to make sure that the front and rear shutter curtains are simultaneously open long enough for the flash to discharge most of it's pulse (t.1 time).

Cheers,
Ben

Ben

  

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