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Subject: "Advice for off camera flash use - Basic Scenario" Previous topic | Next topic
Abedirov Registered since 28th Jun 2011Tue 01-Nov-11 11:52 AM
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"Advice for off camera flash use - Basic Scenario"


Moscow, RU
          

Dear All,

This is my first post at Nikonians, although I have been reading these forums for several months.
I am a beginner with D7000, 35 1.8DX and SB700. I learn by taking photos of may wife and my new born son (3 weeks old) mostly indoors and have couple of questions about the off camera flash use:

1. What flash mode to use? I have read several books and my understanding
g that I should use normal sync in a dark room e.g., at night and slow plus rear sync mode if I take pictures during daytime and want to take into account ambient light. Correct?
2. What is the optimal position for the flash unit? I use one off camera flash, so I put the SG-3IR infrared filter to block light from the built in flash and put SB700 to the left or right side of the subject. But where exactly shall I put it? Which angle to the subject? Which height? My understanding is that the flash should be positioned higher than the camera. Is this correct?
3. Use of diffuser. I normally put the supplied diffuser on the flash and point the head at 90 degrees. This is the advice of Mike Hagen and I follow it blindly (yes, I do own a copy of "The Nikon Creative Lightning System" which is an excellent book, but does not answer all the questions).

I have tons of other questions, but would like to get some answers to the above ones first.

Thanks in advance,
Aziz

  

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Reply message RE: Advice for off camera flash use - Basic Scenario
Abedirov
02nd Nov 2011
1
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rbsandor Gold Member
03rd Nov 2011
2
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Abedirov
04th Nov 2011
3
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ScottChapin Moderator Awarded for his high level skills in various areas, including Aviation and Birds Photography
04th Nov 2011
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rbsandor Gold Member
05th Nov 2011
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jrp Administrator JRP is one of the co-founders, has in-depth knowledge in various areas. Awarded for his contributions for the Resources
05th Nov 2011
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Diane Vancouver
05th Nov 2011
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jrp Administrator JRP is one of the co-founders, has in-depth knowledge in various areas. Awarded for his contributions for the Resources
06th Nov 2011
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luckyphoto Gold Member
07th Nov 2011
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Don Boys
07th Nov 2011
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Arkayem Moderator Awarded for his high level skills in flash photography
07th Nov 2011
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Abedirov
07th Nov 2011
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07th Nov 2011
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Arkayem Moderator Awarded for his high level skills in flash photography
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Abedirov
08th Nov 2011
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ChrisPlatt
08th Nov 2011
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Abedirov
08th Nov 2011
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08th Nov 2011
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11th Nov 2011
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Arkayem Moderator Awarded for his high level skills in flash photography
11th Nov 2011
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Arkayem Moderator Awarded for his high level skills in flash photography
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     Reply message RE: Advice for off camera flash use - Basic Scenario
Arkayem Moderator Awarded for his high level skills in flash photography
07th Nov 2011
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08th Nov 2011
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Abedirov Registered since 28th Jun 2011Wed 02-Nov-11 06:39 PM
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#1. "RE: Advice for off camera flash use - Basic Scenario"
In response to Reply # 0


Moscow, RU
          

Anyone? Not even "welcome to the forum" reply?

  

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rbsandor Gold Member Nikonian since 29th Aug 2007Thu 03-Nov-11 02:22 PM
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#2. "RE: Advice for off camera flash use - Basic Scenario"
In response to Reply # 0


Denver, US
          

Aziz: a belated welcome to the forum. I like to use flash, but am not an expert by any means, but I'll try and answer your questions. First, I leave the flash in rear sync as this tells the flash to fire at the end of the exposure rather than at the beginning of the exposure. I'll combine questions 2 and 3. I try and make my flash exposures look like flash hasn't been used at all. To that end, I follow the suggestions of Neil van Niekirk which is to make the light soft and directional. Here's a link. http://neilvn.com/tangents/ . Look at the right hand side of the page for items labeled 01,02 etc and read them. You may also want to get one or both books which deal with on and off camera flash.
Neil is a strong proponent of bouncing flash off a surface that is behind or alongside him rather than either A: aiming the flash straight ahead at the subject or B: bouncing the flash at a 45 on the ceiling in front of him. Bouncing the flash off a wall or wall/ceiling junction that is to the side or behind creates very nice directional light. Doing so also creates diffused or soft light since you have now bounced the light off a very big surface, a surface that is many times larger than a diffuser. The height you place the flash is not too important as long as it is not too low in relation to your subject.
My suggestions are just a starting point. You have the luxury of experimenting with your digital outfit. Hope this helps. Richard

  

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Abedirov Registered since 28th Jun 2011Fri 04-Nov-11 06:55 PM
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#3. "RE: Advice for off camera flash use - Basic Scenario"
In response to Reply # 2


Moscow, RU
          

Richard, thanks for your post, it is very helpful, I tried to bounce of the wall and celling behind the subject and seem to get better results than bouncing at a 45 degrees ahead, but it really depends on a lot of factors.

So, if I bounce off a surface which is behind or along the subject, I probably should not use a diffuser as I need all the flash power? And I should put the flash at 35 zoom setting since I my lens is 35 mm?

  

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ScottChapin Moderator Awarded for his high level skills in various areas, including Aviation and Birds Photography Charter MemberFri 04-Nov-11 08:17 PM
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#4. "RE: Advice for off camera flash use - Basic Scenario"
In response to Reply # 0


Powder Springs, US
          

Hi Aziz, and welcome to Nikonians!

>1. What flash mode to use? I have read several books and my
>understanding
>g that I should use normal sync in a dark room e.g., at night
>and slow plus rear sync mode if I take pictures during daytime
>and want to take into account ambient light. Correct?

Correct with a caveat. I use rear sync whenever ambient light is important. That could be indoors in low light and not just daytime. Rear sync tries to balance the exposure to the ambient light level.

>2. What is the optimal position for the flash unit? I use one
>off camera flash, so I put the SG-3IR infrared filter to block
>light from the built in flash and put SB700 to the left or
>right side of the subject. But where exactly shall I put it?
>Which angle to the subject? Which height? My understanding is
>that the flash should be positioned higher than the camera.
>Is this correct?

That is a matter of taste, but when shooting head shots, it should be higher to prevent red eye and looking down at a 20 degree angle. Again, this is a matter of taste.

>3. Use of diffuser. I normally put the supplied diffuser on
>the flash and point the head at 90 degrees. This is the
>advice of Mike Hagen and I follow it blindly (yes, I do own a
>copy of "The Nikon Creative Lightning System" which
>is an excellent book, but does not answer all the questions).

I generally do that to, but obviously, this breaks down when shooting large subjects or from great distances. Personally, I use a Gary Fong when I'm shooting portraits offhand.

Scott Chapin
Powder Springs, GA, USA
Nikonians Team Member

  

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rbsandor Gold Member Nikonian since 29th Aug 2007Sat 05-Nov-11 01:32 AM
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#5. "RE: Advice for off camera flash use - Basic Scenario"
In response to Reply # 0


Denver, US
          

Aziz: the use of flash on or off camera is a very broad subject. The most you can expect to learn on a forum is limited by the nature of a forum. I strongly urge you to visit the website I posted and read the free articles and even better to buy the books detailing the use of on and off camera flash. The subjects are written in very clear language and cover the topics from A to Z. Richard

  

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jrp Administrator JRP is one of the co-founders, has in-depth knowledge in various areas. Awarded for his contributions for the Resources Charter MemberSat 05-Nov-11 09:36 AM
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#6. "RE: Advice for off camera flash use - Basic Scenario"
In response to Reply # 0
Sun 06-Nov-11 07:50 AM by jrp

San Pedro Garza García, MX
          

As has been said, many settings are a matter of personal taste and circumstantial regarding your surroundings and available light.

Let me use one example:

My daughter at Halloween (Day of the Death in Mexico) disguised as Frida Kahlo as a tribute to her.



1. Room: low ceiling, at night, artificial light, incandescent, not too bright.
The speedlight would then be practically the main light.

2. Setup: D700 + SB-900 speedlight on-camera with Gary Fong Universal flash diffuser (open, no dome)

3. Lens: 85mm f/1.4D AF (best portrait lens in my opinion)

4. Camera settings: Camera on P Mode ("P" for "perfect"), no EV compensation; White Balance on AUTO (could have been on "Flash"); ISO 400 - to achieve a smaller aperture for better depth of field of the subject and her dress (f/5.6); Center-Weighted metering to concentrate on the subject.

5. Flash settings: i-TTL no flash compensation, front (normal) sync, becasue she is close to the wall.

6. Direction of the flash: pointing to the left (straight forward into the closest wall) my left hand covering the flash diffuser at the front to provide a slight shade on her left side of the face. (You can tell a slight shadow above her left shoulder, showing the direction of the light. Not upwards to avoid baggie shadows under the eyes.

7. Lens positioning, at the level of her chin, for better proportionality (no perspective distortion) of facial features.

All of the above is just one style for this particular occasion on the run.
Practice, and then practice more.

Have a great time
JRP (Founder & Administrator. Nikonian at the north-eastern Mexican desert) Gallery, Brief Love Story, The Team
Join the Silver, Gold and Platinum members that help this happen; upgrade. Join your personal web site to the Nikonians WebRing
Make sure you check our workshops at The Nikonians Academy and the product catalog of the Photo Pro Shop

Attachment #1, (jpg file)

  

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Diane Vancouver Registered since 15th Jul 2010Sat 05-Nov-11 02:21 PM
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#7. "RE: Advice for off camera flash use - Basic Scenario"
In response to Reply # 6


CA
          

Wow, thanks for the detailed explanation for the "Kahlo" photo. The "why" of all your choices is particularly useful for a new flash user.

It's interesting to see such good use of on camera flash since everyone preaches off camera. But off camera is not always so useful when friends or family don't want to hang around while I set things up. It's nice to see you use some of the automatic things on the camera too. Sometimes you just have to take the photo.

The subject helps - your daughter is stunning!

  

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jrp Administrator JRP is one of the co-founders, has in-depth knowledge in various areas. Awarded for his contributions for the Resources Charter MemberSun 06-Nov-11 08:13 AM
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#8. "RE: Advice for off camera flash use - Basic Scenario"
In response to Reply # 7
Sun 06-Nov-11 08:37 AM by jrp

San Pedro Garza García, MX
          

Thank you, Diane.
The simple trick is to understand light.
Where it is coming from and how it will affect the image.
How powerful, direct, indirect, bounced or softened you want it.

I am one of those preachers of off-camera flash use -whenever possible.
As you say, not always you can set it up.
I caught her running out of her room to a party. So I had one minute to do it, therefore I used on-camera flash since I had no idea where I could take the picture. Had no time to even mount a flash bracket.

When I know where the action will take place I like to use as many speedlights as possible.
This gives you the freedom to photograph from whatever position your subjects are within that room.

Below a sample of three speedlights on the corners of the dining room, mounted upwards for full light softening (by spreading the light all over with Gary Fong diffusers), while combining window light, triggered by a SU-800 commander unit:



When I have the time I setup my light boxes and studio strobes, but that can seldom happen with this restless family, always on the go.

Some other recent examples can be seen here.

Have a great time
JRP (Founder & Administrator. Nikonian at the north-eastern Mexican desert) Gallery, Brief Love Story, The Team
Join the Silver, Gold and Platinum members that help this happen; upgrade. Join your personal web site to the Nikonians WebRing
Make sure you check our workshops at The Nikonians Academy and the product catalog of the Photo Pro Shop

Attachment #1, (jpg file)

  

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luckyphoto Gold Member Nikonian since 27th Dec 2010Mon 07-Nov-11 12:45 PM
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#10. "RE: Advice for off camera flash use - Basic Scenario"
In response to Reply # 8


Port Charlotte, US
          

>The simple trick is to understand light.>

I had to smile at this statement. It's true. The word photography means writing with light, however, getting to that point of "understanding light" is the challenging and sometimes frustrating, but fun part

Larry

"Red is gray and yellow white, but we decide which is right
....and which is an illusion"

Moody Blues - Nights in White Satin

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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Don Boys Registered since 12th Aug 2007Mon 07-Nov-11 12:20 PM
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#9. "RE: Advice for off camera flash use - Basic Scenario"
In response to Reply # 0


Hope, US
          

Take a look at http://neilvn.com/tangents/flash-photography-techniques/4-bouncing-flash/, and the pages linked in that article. Then look for Niel's book On-Camera Flash. His idea is that you use surrounding walls to provide the soft source, and block direct light form the flash with the black foamie thing. The camera is in manual exposure, the flash set to TTL. Slight adjustments are made with Flash Compensation. When the subject is not alway a constant distance from the camera this technique is perfect. His On-Camera Flash book is an excellent source, but he also has a second book on Off Camera Flash.

Don Boys
Hope, MI

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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Arkayem Moderator Awarded for his high level skills in flash photography Charter MemberMon 07-Nov-11 01:29 PM
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#11. "RE: Advice for off camera flash use - Basic Scenario"
In response to Reply # 0
Mon 07-Nov-11 01:32 PM by Arkayem

Richmond Hill, GA (Savannah), US
          

>This is my first post at Nikonians, although I have been
>reading these forums for several months.

Welcome to Nikonians. I hope we will see your posts regularly.

>I am a beginner with D7000, 35 1.8DX and SB700. I learn by
>taking photos of may wife and my new born son (3 weeks old)
>mostly indoors and have couple of questions about the off
>camera flash use:
>
>1. What flash mode to use? I have read several books and my
>understanding
>g that I should use normal sync in a dark room e.g., at night
>and slow plus rear sync mode if I take pictures during daytime
>and want to take into account ambient light. Correct?

This is somewhat correct. However the situation is very complex. When you select rear sync, you are actually doing two things: 1) you are firing the flash right before the shutter closes, and 2) you are telling the camera to use a slow shutter speed that will create a an available light image, so that the flash adds fill. The problem is that you can easily overexpose if you use the flash in regular TTL mode, because the flash in TTL mode will set its power thinking that it will be supplying all of the light.

So, if you decide to use rear sync, and you have the camera in one of the auto modes (P,S,A) then it is usually best to also use the flash in TTL-BL mode. Then, it will attempt to balance the flash power to the ambient, and you will end up adding fill to the available light image.

However, if you use rear sync with the camera in Manual mode, the camera will obviously not be selecting a slow shutter speed. You will be controlling the amount of ambient light that is included in the image by manually setting the shutter and aperture. This means that in camera Manual mode with rear sync, you should use regular TTL and allow the flash to provide the primary light.

My personal recommendation is to use the flash as primary when indoors and keep it in regular TTL mode with the camera in manual mode and set to 1/80th and f/4 as a starting point. Then adjust the shutter speed to allow as much ambient into the image as you want. It is usually not important whether the flash is in rear or front sync mode unless there is a lot of ambient light and the subject is moving quickly. Fast dancing or gymnastics are examples where you might see an advantage from rear sync.

>2. What is the optimal position for the flash unit? I use one
>off camera flash, so I put the SG-3IR infrared filter to block
>light from the built in flash and put SB700 to the left or
>right side of the subject. But where exactly shall I put it?
>Which angle to the subject? Which height? My understanding is
>that the flash should be positioned higher than the camera.
>Is this correct?

For portraits, it usually is best to position the flash slightly above the subject and slightly to the right or left. Light from above usually looks more natural. Then, the camera position is usually best at eye level to the subject. Don't move the flash too far right or left of the camera, or you will start getting strong shadows to the opposite direction.

>3. Use of diffuser. I normally put the supplied diffuser on
>the flash and point the head at 90 degrees. This is the
>advice of Mike Hagen and I follow it blindly (yes, I do own a
>copy of "The Nikon Creative Lightning System" which
>is an excellent book, but does not answer all the questions).

The purpose of the diffuser is to send light in all directions and let it bounce off walls and ceilings before arriving at the subject. Light that comes from many different directions is soft light. With that in mind, it is usually best indoors to aim the diffuser straight up.

I invite you to read my blogs plus all the Q&A on this subject starting with #1 at: http://nikonclspracticalguide.blogspot.com/2008/01/nikon-flash-two-separate-metering.html

Russ
Nikonian Team Member
Russell MacDonald Photography
Nikon CLS Practical Guide

  

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Abedirov Registered since 28th Jun 2011Mon 07-Nov-11 08:38 PM
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#12. "RE: Advice for off camera flash use - Basic Scenario"
In response to Reply # 11


Moscow, RU
          

Thank you all for the explanations and the beautiful pictures. It is much easier to understand the logic when illustrated by examples.

I already bought Neil's Off-Camera Flash book plus I have two other books on flash photography, so it should become clearer once I read them all or not.. . The trouble with all these books - they are written by professional photographers who normally have access to multiple flash units, diffusers, umbrellas, assistants and who take photos of models mostly in daylight and use complex setup to achieve artistic lighting in manual mode etc. I just have one flash on a light stand, the supplied diffuser, supplied and would like to take pictures of my wife and son sitting in my living room on a sofa...

Well, I should probably stop moaning and continue learning by taking more pictures, but I have one more question to ask - I am struggling with the white balance. Below is an example of a picture I recently took. In the first picture I left the white balance on auto, the red channel is blown up and it looks too red for my taste:



Then, I did some adjustments and changed the white balance to incandescent:


Now it looks too bluish. Which picture looks more natural to you and what should I do to improve the white balance?

Thanks,
Aziz

Attachment #1, (jpg file)
Attachment #2, (jpg file)

  

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Don Boys Registered since 12th Aug 2007Mon 07-Nov-11 09:12 PM
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#13. "RE: Advice for off camera flash use - Basic Scenario"
In response to Reply # 12


Hope, US
          

I don't believe auto wb will work because it most likely senses the light before the flash. I would use either flash or daylight settings, somewhere around 5500 ºK. I am guessing the flash light is much greater than the ambient, perhaps by 2 stops.

You cannot go wrong by reading the blog mentioned in the comment after mine. But, it takes a while to sink in. When the flash is on TTL you can change the aperture to whatever you want depending on dof, and the flash compensates. Neil explains that in detail. The Off-Camera book uses about what you have, plus a piece of foam.

Regardless of the color differences, the photos are precious. Hope you are getting sufficient sleep.

Don

Don Boys
Hope, MI

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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Arkayem Moderator Awarded for his high level skills in flash photography Charter MemberMon 07-Nov-11 10:36 PM
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#16. "RE: Advice for off camera flash use - Basic Scenario"
In response to Reply # 13


Richmond Hill, GA (Savannah), US
          

>I don't believe auto wb will work because it most likely
>senses the light before the flash.

That's not quite right. The White Balance reading is calculated based on the reflected color of the monitor preflash and the ambient light mixed together.

However, the flash is so much brighter than the ambient in most situations that the small contribution from the ambient hardly affects the white balance at all during a flash picture. That makes the white balance set at around 5500K, which will make the picture way too warm if a lot of ambient is allowed to contribute.

In this picture the ambient was contributing far too much for the white balance to work properly. The flash was being used as 'fill' without realizing it.

Russ
Nikonian Team Member
Russell MacDonald Photography
Nikon CLS Practical Guide

  

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Abedirov Registered since 28th Jun 2011Tue 08-Nov-11 08:35 PM
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#19. "RE: Advice for off camera flash use - Basic Scenario"
In response to Reply # 16


Moscow, RU
          

Russ, thank you for the explanation. I noticed that iso value affects the colour of a picture, but could not understand why. Now, it all makes sense. I tried to use the tungsten gel supplied with the flash. And the picture looked warmer. Now I am confused, the gel is supposed to negate the orange colour cast, but it did not. What is your advise on using tungsten gel?
Aziz

  

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ChrisPlatt Registered since 04th Jun 2011Tue 08-Nov-11 09:02 PM
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#20. "RE: Advice for off camera flash use - Basic Scenario"
In response to Reply # 19


US
          

Did you have white balance set to "Auto?"

Visit my gallery.

  

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Abedirov Registered since 28th Jun 2011Tue 08-Nov-11 09:29 PM
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#21. "RE: Advice for off camera flash use - Basic Scenario"
In response to Reply # 20


Moscow, RU
          

Chris, yes I did. Actually, I need to do more testing. Now, I think the picture looks more natural with the gel.. So it looks like it is doing its job.
Do I need to switch to spot metering when I switch to manual to change to TTL from TTL-BL?

  

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ChrisPlatt Registered since 04th Jun 2011Tue 08-Nov-11 11:47 PM
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#23. "RE: Advice for off camera flash use - Basic Scenario"
In response to Reply # 21
Wed 09-Nov-11 12:15 AM by ChrisPlatt

US
          

Photography can be like a golf swing, sometimes you try to consider too much at one time and nothing comes together. No, you don't need to switch to spot metering. You also don't need to switch to manual when you change to TTL from TTL-BL, but it is a good way to get consistent flash results with the outcome you're looking for when you're using flash.

Russ has made a very good point about using Gels in his post - with the exception that the D7000/SB-700 combo has apparently automated what used to be a more complex process for setting the white balance. Using the gels will result in daylight-like white balance. We're accustomed to and generally pleased by the warmer background lighting of tungsten. When I do use gels (frequently) inside, I often restore a little of the warmth either in post processing or by adjusting the warmth of the standard white balance settings. For instance, auto white balance can be adjusted to be slightly cooler or warmer by holding in the WB button and rotating the front command dial. I prefer to do it in post processing though if I think it is necessary. So why do I use a gel at all if I then restore some of the warmth? To get consistent color lighting in both foreground and background. It's just a matter of taste - tungsten lights look overly orange to me in the background compared to the foreground subjects if I don't use a gel. But the difference can be subtle and I've also ruined a number of shots by using gels when I should have just overpowered the ambient light - like a couple of Thanksgivings ago in my sister-in-laws kitchen that had copper ceilings. What a disaster!


But I fear we're making the golf swing to complicated again. I think you should follow Russ' advice and get consistent results with a basic setup before moving on to accessories to modify the flash. It will all come together rather quickly.

I think you'll find Russ' explanation and guidance in his CLS practical guide to be very helpful in understanding how it all comes together. I have certainly found it to be helpful.

http://nikonclspracticalguide.blogspot.com/2008/01/nikon-flash-two-separate-metering.html




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Abedirov Registered since 28th Jun 2011Fri 11-Nov-11 06:47 PM
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#24. "RE: Advice for off camera flash use - Basic Scenario"
In response to Reply # 23


Moscow, RU
          

Thank you all for the great advice! This thread has taught me more than all the books on the flash photography that I own combined.

I just want to share the recent finding related to the use of Gels with D7000/SB-700 combo. The automated process when the flash knows that a gel is put on and communicates it to the camera ONLY works if the flash is mounted on the camera. I did some tests and the balance looks really nice if the flash is mounted on, but, as soon as you take it off and put in the remote mode the white balance becomes very warm, does nor look right at all at least on an auto white balance setting. I am quite disappointed that the flash manual does not provide any information about this limitation.

Anyway, since I want to use my flash off camera, I will follow Russ' advice and refrain from use of Gels for now.

Cheers,
Aziz

  

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Arkayem Moderator Awarded for his high level skills in flash photography Charter MemberFri 11-Nov-11 08:22 PM
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#25. "RE: Advice for off camera flash use - Basic Scenario"
In response to Reply # 24


Richmond Hill, GA (Savannah), US
          

>Anyway, since I want to use my flash off camera, I will follow
>Russ' advice and refrain from use of Gels for now.
>
>Cheers,
>Aziz
>

Hi Aziz,

I reading back through my advice to you, I realize I forgot to mention very important point.

When you are shooting flash indoors in a fairly small room, the flash will overpower both the ambient on the subject and the ambient in the background. In a small room, changing the shutter speed will change the ambient on both the subject and the background.

In a large room, where the background is at least three times as far from the camera as the subject, adjusting shutter speed will affect the background much more than the subject.

This is because the flash power weakens quickly by the square of the distance. The TTL system sets the flash power right for the subject, but by the time the flash pulse gets to a distant background behind the subject, it has become very weak. This leaves the background exposed almost totally by the ambient.

Russ
Nikonian Team Member
Russell MacDonald Photography
Nikon CLS Practical Guide

  

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Arkayem Moderator Awarded for his high level skills in flash photography Charter MemberTue 08-Nov-11 10:04 PM
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#22. "RE: Advice for off camera flash use - Basic Scenario"
In response to Reply # 19


Richmond Hill, GA (Savannah), US
          

>What is your advise on using tungsten
gel?

My advice is don't try to use a gel until you figure out how to make good pictures without it. You don't need a gel to make excellent images. In fact, in my wedding business I almost never use a gel.

Set your camera up like I suggested, without the gel, and try it. Play with the shutter speed and notice how you can control the amount of ambient in the image. The subject skin color will be perfect, and the background will be warm from the tungsten lights. This is usually what you want.

If you decide that you do not want the background to be warm, this is the only time you need the gel. The gel (used correctly) will not affect skin color. It will only affect the background.

To use the tungsten gel correctly, attach it to the flash and set your camera on Tungsten White Balance. Then, use the settings you used previously (ISO 800, 1/40th, and f/2) and use regular TTL. This will make the whole image appear to be cool daylight in color.

Like I said, this is usually NOT what you want. Most people prefer the warm background rather than the daylight balanced background.

Russ
Nikonian Team Member
Russell MacDonald Photography
Nikon CLS Practical Guide

  

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Arkayem Moderator Awarded for his high level skills in flash photography Charter MemberMon 07-Nov-11 10:30 PM
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#15. "RE: Advice for off camera flash use - Basic Scenario"
In response to Reply # 12


Richmond Hill, GA (Savannah), US
          

Hi Aziz,

The reason your pictures are too warm is that you are using a very slow shutter speed (1/40th), a very high ISO (800), and a very wide aperture (f/2). All this adds up to too much ammbient is being allowed to enter the exposure.

This means that you are using the flash as 'fill', and probably do not realize that. You normally do not want to use fill flash when the ambient light is a different color than the flash. The temperature of the flash is about 5500K and the color of incandescent is about 3400K.

To fix this, make the flash primary. Use the settings I suggested above for indoor flash: set your camera in Manual mode, ISO 400, f/4, 1/80th, and set the flash in regular TTL (not TTL-BL).

This will make the flash the primary light source and the white balance will shift towards daylight as a result. This will give you much more accurate skin tones.

Russ
Nikonian Team Member
Russell MacDonald Photography
Nikon CLS Practical Guide

  

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ChrisPlatt Registered since 04th Jun 2011Tue 08-Nov-11 08:21 PM
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#18. "RE: Advice for off camera flash use - Basic Scenario"
In response to Reply # 15


US
          

Doesn't the SB-700 come with solid plastic gels to color correct for ambient light so he wouldn't have to dominate with the flash? My understanding is that the flash automatically senses the gels and communicates the correct white balance to the camera. I don't have that flash so I don't know how well it works, but certainly sounds easier than using gels and setting a custom white balance. So something someone new to flash can try?

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NenBikonian Registered since 30th Sep 2011Mon 07-Nov-11 10:00 PM
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#14. "RE: Advice for off camera flash use - Basic Scenario"
In response to Reply # 0


Roswell, US
          

Hello Aziz,

Flash Mode - depends whether you want the camera to make decisions based on how it meters the scene or if you want to have complete control over the flash's output. My recommendation (which is based only on my own personal preferences, nothing more) is to use manual mode, i.e. set the camera's popup flash as commander and set your SB700 as remote. In your D7000's menu for the on-camera flash, there should be a menu setting so that your popup acts as commander with mode = manual, then you would set the desired output of the remote (1/1 - 1/64) someplace in that same menu (I still use a D70, so am not familiar with the D7000's menu system).

Flash Position - this also depends on the effect you want, but I suspect you're looking for advice for a portrait. The basic portrait calls for the flash at 45degrees up and over. In other words, if you draw an imaginary line connecting the lens to your subject, place the flash 45 degrees above this line and 45 degrees to the left or right of it (which ever side you feel needs the light). There are MANY other options and my advice is to experiment with them when you aren't trying to get a portrait or shot that you want to keep.

Good luck!

Ben

  

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rbsandor Gold Member Nikonian since 29th Aug 2007Tue 08-Nov-11 05:56 PM
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#17. "RE: Advice for off camera flash use - Basic Scenario"
In response to Reply # 0


Denver, US
          

Aziz: You have made a very wrong assumption re the nature of Neil's book(s). If you take the time to read Neil's books, you'll find that instruction is aimed at the photog using one camera, one flash, either on or off camera. It is geared to the average photographer, not the pro with a whole host of assistants, lights etc.

  

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RMSJr Silver Member Nikonian since 16th Feb 2009Thu 24-Nov-11 01:06 PM
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#26. "RE: Advice for off camera flash use - Basic Scenario"
In response to Reply # 0


Durham, US
          

Thank you for the great content in this post. I have been researching my next NAS dosage and it will be the SB-700.. I have bookmarked this post to refer back to for all the knowledge shared.

Cheers

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Harj Registered since 29th Dec 2010Sat 04-Feb-12 01:07 PM
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#27. "RE: Advice for off camera flash use - Basic Scenario"
In response to Reply # 26


UK
          

Lots of good advice and tips in this thread.

I use SB800's and generally on TTL BL. I will need to experiment some more on the other settings.

Harj

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