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Forums Lobby MASTER YOUR TOOLS Nikon Speedlights & Lighting topic #38303
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Subject: "Studio backdrops" Previous topic | Next topic
56chevy   Austin, US  Registered since 05th Oct 2008 Tue 13-Jan-09 12:05 AM
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"Studio backdrops"



Trying to set up a little NON commercial amateur studio in my home --mostly for family portraits, etc

I now have some light stands, umbrellas, multiple Nikon flash units, backdrop stand -- but have a question about the backdrops themselves --

What color backdrops do you all prefer? I bought a black one -- and it is just so dark and flat -- was wondering what other colors you all like ?

Thanks in advance
Art

  

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HBB Moderator Hal is an expert in several areas, including CLS Awarded for his excellent article contributions to the Resources.   Phoenix, US  Charter Member Tue 13-Jan-09 12:15 AM
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#1. "RE: Studio backdrops"
In response to Reply # 0



Art:

Black backdrops are very useful when you want to isolate the subject from all surroundings. Black is also useful when you want a soft halo of light to surround the subject's head, which is done by firing one of your speedlights against the backdrop.

Neutral gray and white are also popular colors that can be used with and without speedlights firing on them. Gray is a softer image with more background showing, while white is used for high key shots where everything behind the subject goes to pure white.

Colored gels in speedlights can also be used with any color backdrop, to add another dimension to the image.

Beyond the solid colors, an infinite variety of backdrops are available. From my perspective, it is a matter of personal preference. I almost always stick to the standard black, gray and white because I do not want any distracting elements in the images.

Hope this helps a bit.

Regards,

HBB in Phoenix, Arizona
Nikonian Team Member

Go here for a list of membership upgrade benefits.

Photography is a journey with no conceivable destination.

  

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bens0472   Roswell, US  Basic Member Tue 13-Jan-09 02:12 AM
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#2. "RE: Studio backdrops"
In response to Reply # 0



Personally, I'd start with neutral gray if you're only going to buy one backdrop. Depending on the distance and output of your lightsource, you can take that neutral gray background from bright white to black.

Ben

  

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Arkayem Moderator Awarded for his high level skills in flash photography   Richmond Hill, GA (Savannah), US  Charter Member Tue 13-Jan-09 09:25 AM
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#3. "RE: Studio backdrops"
In response to Reply # 0



>What color backdrops do you all prefer? I bought a black one
>-- and it is just so dark and flat -- was wondering what other
>colors you all like ?

The two primary fundamental background colors are black and white.

You can isolate your subject with either one, by making sure that the black one is not illuminated and the white one is. Then, you push the background pixels on the histogram either all the way right or left to remove any detail from the background. This will also eliminate all crease marks or folds.

I use black far more than white.

Russ
http://russmacdonaldphotos.com/
http://NikonCLSPracticalGuide.blogspot.com/

  

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Forums Lobby MASTER YOUR TOOLS Nikon Speedlights & Lighting topic #38303 Previous topic | Next topic