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Forums Lobby MASTER YOUR TOOLS - Hardware & Software Nikon Speedlights & Lighting topic #38252
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Subject: "Light Meter vs In Camera metering" Previous topic | Next topic
56chevy Registered since 05th Oct 2008Sun 11-Jan-09 01:05 AM
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"Light Meter vs In Camera metering"


Austin, US
          

New guys here -- still trying to figure things out
I love classic cars -- and do a lot of shooting in daytime at outdoor car shows --

Would there be any advantage to me using a light meter for this application ? If so -- what type?

How would a light meter help me out in this situration ?

Thanks in Advance for any advice

Art

  

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Replies to this topic
Subject Author Message Date ID
Reply message RE: Light Meter vs In Camera metering
HBB Moderator
12th Jan 2009
1
Reply message RE: Light Meter vs In Camera metering
Chan Tran
13th Jan 2009
2
Reply message RE: Light Meter vs In Camera metering
56chevy
13th Jan 2009
4
     Reply message RE: Light Meter vs In Camera metering
HBB Moderator
13th Jan 2009
5
Reply message RE: Light Meter vs In Camera metering
wailingtoad
13th Jan 2009
3

HBB Moderator Hal is an expert in several areas, including CLS Awarded for his excellent article contributions to the Resources. Charter MemberMon 12-Jan-09 11:06 PM
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#1. "RE: Light Meter vs In Camera metering"
In response to Reply # 0


Phoenix, US
          

Art:

A few questions:

Will you be shooting indoors with overhead lights or outdoors with daylight?

Will you be using your speedlights with your camera for these shots? I notice you have an SB900 and one or more SB600s.

Will you be shooting hand held shots or will you have time to set up a tripod and one or more remote speedlights?

Your camera's metering system measures the light reflected from your subjects (cars). If they are vey light colored and in bright sun, your camera's meter will underexpose them. If they are very dark colored, you camera's meter will overexpose them. In either case, you will have to enter exposure compensation values to get correct exposures.

A hand held meter can be used to measure the incident light falling on the cars as opposed to measuring reflected light like your camera does. It can also measure your speedlight contribution to the image. This all depends on what shooting style you will be using and whether or not you will be using speedlights.

I you haven't used your current speedlights in the CLS mode yet, I suggest doing that before investing in a hand held meter. Place the SB900 on-camera as the master and configure the SB600s as remotes and practice. You may be surprised at what they will do for you.

Regards,

HBB in Phoenix, Arizona
Nikonian Team Member

Go here for a list of membership upgrade benefits.

Photography is a journey with no conceivable destination.

  

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Chan Tran Registered since 04th Dec 2003Tue 13-Jan-09 01:37 AM
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#2. "RE: Light Meter vs In Camera metering"
In response to Reply # 1


Aurora, US
          

I would certain use my meter in incident mode for car shots. If I use flash the flash metering mode of the hand held meter is also very useful. But because I shoot mainly film. For digital I think it's much easier to shoot evaluate than adjust.

  

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56chevy Registered since 05th Oct 2008Tue 13-Jan-09 08:40 PM
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#4. "RE: Light Meter vs In Camera metering"
In response to Reply # 1


Austin, US
          

HBB
Sorry for not providing enough info

1)almost always shoot outdoors in daylight (Texas sun)
2)Do not use my Speedlights for this application
3)Almost always shoot hand held as most folks don't want hard items like tri pods around their VERY expensive cars

I have been messing around with my three speedlights in CLS mode -- and really like what I have been able to do so far -- but this has always been inside -- and not at any of my referenced car shows

Any additional information and help you guys can provide would sure be appreciated

Thanks
Art

Art
"Feels so good feeling good again"

  

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HBB Moderator Hal is an expert in several areas, including CLS Awarded for his excellent article contributions to the Resources. Charter MemberTue 13-Jan-09 09:15 PM
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#5. "RE: Light Meter vs In Camera metering"
In response to Reply # 4


Phoenix, US
          

Art:

Thanks for the update.

You might want to try putting your SB900 on-camera as master and taking one or both of the SB600s along to a car show and see what happens. In the absence of tripods and light stands, you will have to recruit one or more willing assistants (friends, neighbors, kids, spouse, etc.) to hand hold them for you. This shouldn't be too difficult.

With this much light, you will be able to hand hold and shoot at fairly fast shutter speeds to avoid ghost images from the ambient/speedlight mix. This could be a lot of fun and you will come back with images that few others will have.

Let us know what you decide.

Regards,

HBB in Phoenix, Arizona
Nikonian Team Member

Go here for a list of membership upgrade benefits.

Photography is a journey with no conceivable destination.

  

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wailingtoad Registered since 28th Oct 2005Tue 13-Jan-09 08:25 PM
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#3. "RE: Light Meter vs In Camera metering"
In response to Reply # 0


US
          

If you are using only ambient light (i.e. no flash) then an ambient light meter will give you the precise exposure - no worries about 18% grey and all that sort of stuff that reflective meters rely on.

However, if you are planning on using flashes then it gets a lot more difficult. Many light meters can measure flash output. The problem is with the i-TTL and CLS preflashes - the light better will measure the preflashes and ignore the main flash. With your SB-900, you could trigger the flash via a PC cord; however, that's not an option with a SB-600 since it doesn't have a PC socket. There are some workarounds - but they're all kinda kludgy.

I find it's just as fast to take a few test shots and make adjustments based on what I see in the histogram.

Jon Davis
My Nikonians Gallery
My Flickr Gallery
My Epson R2880 Tips & Tricks blog

  

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