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Forums Lobby MASTER YOUR TOOLS - Hardware & Software Nikon Speedlights & Lighting topic #379
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Subject: "harsh shadows" Previous topic | Next topic
Nor Basic MemberMon 24-Sep-01 12:05 PM
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"harsh shadows"


Manila, PH
          

hi!

no complaints re: the SB28! it's a great and smart lens for a not-so-smart photographer(ME!). just one thing i noticed, it seems to overexpose and give harsh shadows when the camera(F80) is held vertically. is it because the F80 doesn't know that the camera is held vertically?

nor

  

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Replies to this topic
Subject Author Message Date ID
Reply message RE: harsh shadows
jrp Administrator JRP is one of the co-founders, has in-depth knowledge in various areas. Awarded for his contributions for the Resources
24th Sep 2001
1
Reply message RE: harsh shadows
gewe21
25th Sep 2001
2
     Reply message RE: harsh shadows
jnscbl
25th Sep 2001
3
          Reply message RE: harsh shadows
jrp Administrator JRP is one of the co-founders, has in-depth knowledge in various areas. Awarded for his contributions for the Resources
25th Sep 2001
4
               Reply message RE: harsh shadows
Nor
25th Sep 2001
5
                    Reply message RE: harsh shadows
jrp Administrator JRP is one of the co-founders, has in-depth knowledge in various areas. Awarded for his contributions for the Resources
25th Sep 2001
6
                         Reply message RE: harsh shadows
Ed
26th Sep 2001
7

jrp Administrator JRP is one of the co-founders, has in-depth knowledge in various areas. Awarded for his contributions for the Resources Charter MemberMon 24-Sep-01 04:26 PM
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#1. "RE: harsh shadows"
In response to Reply # 0


San Pedro Garza García, MX
          

It is the effect of the angle of the light. That is the main reason for recommending the use of a bracket, to always position the flash abovethe lens.
Have a great time
JRP (Nikonian at the north-eastern Mexican desert) My profile, My Gallery
Previous photographic journey, before Nikonians: A Brief Love Story

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gewe21 Basic MemberTue 25-Sep-01 12:11 AM
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#2. "RE: harsh shadows"
In response to Reply # 1


Milwaukee, US
          

How about adding a diffuser, line the Sto-fen OmniBounce ? Will it help ? Just a thought, and also a question.

!!Ad Maiorem Dei Gloriam!!
George Oei

George Oei
Madison, WI
"Dude, you're getting a Nikkor !!!"

  

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jnscbl Basic MemberTue 25-Sep-01 12:37 AM
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#3. "RE: harsh shadows"
In response to Reply # 2


US
          

No.
---scott

http://www.photo.net/photodb/folder?folder_id=149771

--scott

"I am always doing that which I cannot do, in order that I may learn how to do it."
Pablo Picasso

  

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jrp Administrator JRP is one of the co-founders, has in-depth knowledge in various areas. Awarded for his contributions for the Resources Charter MemberTue 25-Sep-01 02:38 AM
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#4. "RE: harsh shadows"
In response to Reply # 3


San Pedro Garza García, MX
          

Scott may have been laconic but he is right as always.
The answer is still no. The light might be gentler, but the shadow will still be there.
Have a great time
JRP (Nikonian at the north-eastern Mexican desert) My profile, My Gallery
Previous photographic journey, before Nikonians: A Brief Love Story

Have a great time
JRP (Founder & Administrator. Nikonian at the north-eastern Mexican desert) Gallery, Brief Love Story, The Team
Join the Silver, Gold and Platinum members that help this happen; upgrade. Join your personal web site to the Nikonians WebRing
Make sure you check our workshops at The Nikonians Academy and the product catalog of the Photo Pro Shop

  

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Nor Basic MemberTue 25-Sep-01 04:05 AM
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#5. "RE: harsh shadows"
In response to Reply # 4


Manila, PH
          

any suggestions for a bracket? i have an f80 with an mb16.

nor

  

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jrp Administrator JRP is one of the co-founders, has in-depth knowledge in various areas. Awarded for his contributions for the Resources Charter MemberTue 25-Sep-01 04:30 AM
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#6. "RE: harsh shadows"
In response to Reply # 5


San Pedro Garza García, MX
          

LAST EDITED ON Sep-25-01 AT 05:34 AM (GMT)

Stroboframe Quick Flip 350, if you use your N80 without the grip.
If you have the grip, then the Camera Flip.
The chart to select the best to accomodate your needs: here
Have a great time
JRP (Nikonian at the north-eastern Mexican desert) My profile, My Gallery
Previous photographic journey, before Nikonians: A Brief Love Story

Have a great time
JRP (Founder & Administrator. Nikonian at the north-eastern Mexican desert) Gallery, Brief Love Story, The Team
Join the Silver, Gold and Platinum members that help this happen; upgrade. Join your personal web site to the Nikonians WebRing
Make sure you check our workshops at The Nikonians Academy and the product catalog of the Photo Pro Shop

  

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Ed Basic MemberWed 26-Sep-01 01:31 AM
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#7. "RE: harsh shadows"
In response to Reply # 6


US
          

> just one thing i noticed, it ... give harsh
> shadows when the camera(F80) is held vertically.


You'd have to tell us which type of harsh shadows first. Is it the shadows that fall behind the subject (on a wall perhaps), or is it the shadows under the eyes, nose or chin? JRP and Scott assume it's the former. But since you didn't say which, I'll reply to both types.

Positioning the flash on top is only one of many ways of reducing the first type of harsh shadows. The reasoning behind a high flash position is that the shadows tend to fall down and away behind your subject (in addition to reducing red-eye). You don't necessarily need a bracket for this, you may also just hold the flash off-camera, high and above your subject. I've been known to walk around during informal events such as birthday parties with a camera, sync cord and flash in my hand or in pocket. Sometimes flash brackets are too much to handle for these simpler events.

The 3rd method: In the event you find yourself with just on-camera flash (no sync cord), simply avoid shooting people too close to a wall or pillar or anything huge in the background. If there's nothing for the shadow to land on, there'd be no harsh shadows!

> How about adding a diffuser, line the Sto-fen OmniBounce ?
> Will it help ?


Yes, definitely. The 4th way of reducing the first type of harsh shadows is also the method of taking care of the 2nd type (harsh shadows on face, neck, etc.). This is by diffusing/modifying the light, not by the placement of the flash. Stofen Omni-bounce and Lumiquest Bouncers are the quick-and-easy solutions for this. (I know, I've been using them for many years). The 5th method for a vertical shot is to swivel the SB-28's head and bounce it off the ceiling. Sometimes I bounce the flash off the wall too. I have a 8x10 picture of my then 8-month old son asleep on my wife's shoulder with flash bounced off the near wall for a very pleasing side-lighting.

In my experience, a diffuser such as the Stofen will help reduce both types of harsh shadows. The Lumiquest will too to a lesser extent. The degree of the Stofen's reduction will depend on the size of the room, which the Stofen is so dependent on. The bigger the room, the less effect the Stofen has. Be aware though that the Stofen sucks about 2 stops of flash power from your light.

Ed


Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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