Go to a  "printer friendly" view of this message which allow an easy print Printer-friendly copy Go to the page which allows you to send this topic link and a message to a friend Email this topic to a friend
Forums Lobby MASTER YOUR TOOLS - Hardware & Software Nikon Speedlights & Lighting topic #353
View in linear mode

Subject: "Manual use of SB 26 with N90s" Previous topic | Next topic
Stuart Basic MemberSun 23-Sep-01 04:12 PM
19 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
"Manual use of SB 26 with N90s"



          

I have an N90s with a short in the body somewhere that causes my speedlight to act like a disco light, so I'm attempting to use my SB-26 with an SC-15 sync cord and a remote handle/hotshoe setup.

I'm so accustomed to the camera and speedlight "talking to one another" that shifting to manual mode has me a bit stumped. I'm especially interested in using the SB-26 for fill-flash purposes, primarily for shooting outdoor portraits.

I'd appreciate anyone's suggestions on how to set the camera (everything from mode to aperture to shutter speed) in order to re-create the TTL-metering for fill flash. Many thanks, in advance,
Stuart

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

Replies to this topic
Subject Author Message Date ID
Reply message RE: Manual use of SB 26 with N90s
jrp Administrator
23rd Sep 2001
1
Reply message RE: Manual use of SB 26 with N90s
jnscbl
24th Sep 2001
2
Reply message RE: Manual use of SB 26 with N90s
Ed
24th Sep 2001
3
Reply message RE: Manual use of SB 26 with N90s
Stuart
24th Sep 2001
4
Reply message RE: Manual use of SB 26 with N90s
Johnny
25th Sep 2001
5

jrp Administrator JRP is one of the co-founders, has in-depth knowledge in various areas. Awarded for his contributions for the Resources Charter MemberSun 23-Sep-01 04:40 PM
34292 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#1. "RE: Manual use of SB 26 with N90s"
In response to Reply # 0


San Pedro Garza García, MX
          

TTL is like pregnancy, either you have it or you don't. For what you are telling us, the means to communicate TTL info is out. So maybe your best bet is to use your SB-26 in manual, compute distance and GN info and adjust apertures accordingly.
If your machine is not setting the shutter speed automatically between 1/60 and 1/125 to come into sync, you may have to do it manually too.
Have a great time
JRP (Nikonian at the north-eastern Mexican desert) My profile
Previous photographic journey, before Nikonians: A Brief Love Story

Have a great time
JRP (Founder & Administrator. Nikonian at the north-eastern Mexican desert) Gallery, Brief Love Story, The Team
Join the Silver, Gold and Platinum members that help this happen; upgrade. Join your personal web site to the Nikonians WebRing
Make sure you check our workshops at The Nikonians Academy and the product catalog of the Photo Pro Shop

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

jnscbl Basic MemberMon 24-Sep-01 01:42 AM
3601 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#2. "RE: Manual use of SB 26 with N90s"
In response to Reply # 0


US
          

Outdoor portraits with manual flash is certainly no strain. Just select the shallowest aperture that your lens performs well at. If a prime, full aperture; a zoom, maybe stopped down a stop or two. For manual flash, use manual mode on the camera. Set the aperture, then use the shutterspeed to adjust the exposure. For a balanced lighting, set the power on the flash to match the aperture and the flash-to-subject distance. For key flash, use the shutterspeed to underexpose by one stop (shutterspeed doesn't affect flash). I believe the N90 synchs at up to 1/250, so this gives you plenty of flexibility. For fill flash, override the flash's aperture setting (if it receives it from the camera) and set it to one stop wider than you are actually using. In other words, lens set to f4, flash set to f2.8; or, just use the next lower power setting, say 1/8 instead of 1/4. The nice thing about manual flash is that you get exactly what you ask for, none of that "backlighting fooled the meter" crap. You may never go back, at least for outdoor portraits.
---scott

PORTFOLIO
http://www.photo.net/photodb/folder?folder_id=149771

--scott

"I am always doing that which I cannot do, in order that I may learn how to do it."
Pablo Picasso

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

Ed Basic MemberMon 24-Sep-01 04:01 AM
1618 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#3. "RE: Manual use of SB 26 with N90s"
In response to Reply # 0


US
          

LAST EDITED ON Sep-24-01 AT 06:07 AM (GMT)

Manual is fine if you're flash is on camera. For each aperture you choose, the Nikon SB-26 is already internally calculating the correct flash-subject distance by dividing the aperture you've chosen into the fixed GN and indicating the result (the flash-subject distance) by a bar over the distance scale. The trick with Manual is you need to guesstimate the actual flash-subject distance to match (or adjust) with the indicated distance on the flash LCD.

Here's how to do Manual fill-flash:
1) Meter your subject, and set your shutter speed and aperture. Your shutter speed should be within the camera's top sync speed.
2) Switch your SB-26 to Manual mode.
3) The aperture you've chosen will appear on your SB-26 LCD. When you reset your aperture on the lens, the SB-26 will also adjust its aperture with a corresponding change in the distance indicator.
4) If necessary, reduce the flash power until the distance bar indicator corresponds to the flash-subject distance (which you estimate after focusing the lens). This setting is 1:1 flash/sun ratio.
5) For -1 fill-flash, you need to reduce the flash power *once* from this setting, e.g. if it says 1/4 power, reduce by half to 1/8. You're now in fill-flash territory. This will be 1:3 lighting ratio.

All this is fine and dandy if your flash is on camera since you can use the lens focus indicators to estimate the distance.

But since you're planning to take the flash off camera, estimating the flash-subject distance would be more difficult (but not impossible - you can always carry a meter stick ). The alternative to using Manual is Auto-mode. Your SB-26 has 4 modes: TTL, Manual, Non-TTL Auto and Repeating Flash.

Using non-TTL Auto gives you more flexibility and efficiency over Manual. Simply choose an aperture that covers the flash-subject distance and as long as you stay within this range your exposures will be fine.

Here's how to do fill-flash in Auto-mode:
1) Set the SB-26 to "A" mode.
2) Meter your scene and set your shutter speed and aperture.
3) Unlike Manual and TTL, the SB-26 will not adjust the flash aperture to follow the lens aperture. Set the flash aperture manually to correspond to your lens and check the distance range to ensure it covers the flash-subject distance. Using a wide aperture such as f/4 with ISO 100 film gives you anywhere from 5-40 ft (I'm only approximating here to give you a rough idea of the flash range).
4) If you set the flash aperture the same as the lens, this is 1:1 flash/sun ratio.
5) Stop down the lens 1 stop, and you're in -1 fill-flash territory. This will also underexpose the ambient light. Alternatively, you can "open up" the flash aperture 1 stop to get the same -1 fill flash effect.

The advantage of Auto-mode over Manual is that you and the flash can move around, close in on your subject, etc. without adjusting apertures and distances for each shot.

I've had success with outdoor portraits with all 3 methods of fill-flash: TTL (with compensation), Auto-mode, and Manual. It's not rocket science but it takes practice to be efficient at these modes.

Ed

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

    
Stuart Basic MemberMon 24-Sep-01 10:18 AM
19 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#4. "RE: Manual use of SB 26 with N90s"
In response to Reply # 3



          

Thank you VERY much for the suggestions, Ed. ~Stu

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

Johnny Basic MemberTue 25-Sep-01 05:56 PM
1038 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#5. "RE: Manual use of SB 26 with N90s"
In response to Reply # 0


Westampton, US
          

Stuart,

One thing to check about that short you seem to have. I have found weird things can happen (including the disco effect) if the flash and/or the camera are powered on while attaching the flash to the camera. Make sure both are powered off and reseat the flash.


Just a suggestion,
Johnny

Johnny

---
"I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand." -Confucius

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

Forums Lobby MASTER YOUR TOOLS - Hardware & Software Nikon Speedlights & Lighting topic #353 Previous topic | Next topic


Take the Nikonians Tour and learn more about being a Nikonian Wiki /FAQ /Help Listen to our MP3 photography radio channels Find anything on Nikon and imaging technology - fast!

Copyright © Nikonians 2000, 2014
All Rights Reserved

Nikonians®, NikoScope® and NikoniansAcademy™ are trademarks owned by Nikonians.org.
Nikon®, Nikonos® and Nikkor® are registered trademarks of Nikon Corporation.