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Subject: "Hummingbirds: SU-800 and strobes" Previous topic | Next topic
M_Jackson Silver Member Nikonian since 28th Oct 2005Wed 16-Jan-08 01:19 PM
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"Hummingbirds: SU-800 and strobes"


Jackson, US
          

Hello,
I have been playing with trying to capture hummingbirds for the past few days. I've found some sites that discuss using off camera strobes, then controlling the stop action of the wings by adjusting the output or duration of the strobes. Some of those are probably being controlled as slaves, I assume anyway.

With an SU-800, I can control the amount of flash by adding or subtracting light from each remote. Shooting in low eveing light, I am setting the camera to shutter priority at 1/250 second, then getting whatever the set up give me in TTL mode. It is working fairly well, but I don't see how I could set the strobes to fire a specific duration.

I am using three SB-800 strobes and an R-200 mini strobe.

If anyone here is using an SU-800 to control their remotes for hummingbird photography, I'd love to hear the details. While I like to solve the challenge of freezing the wings, I actually like to see at least a little blurring.

I found this site which helped some:
http://www.dyesscreek.com/miscellaneous_pages/hummingbirds_index.html

He's using canon equipment and some cheaper strobes set to slaves.

I am hoping for a similar site with someone using Nikon equipment. I have 200-400 and 70-200 lenses.

Thanks in advance,
Mike Jackson

M. Jackson
Jackson Hole, WY

Blog: www.bestofthetetons.com
Web Site: www.tetonimages.com

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Reply message RE: Hummingbirds: SU-800 and strobes
HBB Moderator
07th Aug 2007
1
Reply message RE: Hummingbirds: SU-800 and strobes
M_Jackson Silver Member
08th Aug 2007
2
     Reply message RE: Hummingbirds: SU-800 and strobes
michaelhager
08th Aug 2007
3
          Reply message RE: Hummingbirds: SU-800 and strobes
M_Jackson Silver Member
08th Aug 2007
4
               Reply message RE: Hummingbirds: SU-800 and strobes
nrothschild Silver Member
08th Aug 2007
5
                    Reply message RE: Hummingbirds: SU-800 and strobes
M_Jackson Silver Member
08th Aug 2007
6
                         Reply message RE: Hummingbirds: SU-800 and strobes
nrothschild Silver Member
08th Aug 2007
7
                              Reply message RE: Hummingbirds: SU-800 and strobes
M_Jackson Silver Member
08th Aug 2007
8
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nrothschild Silver Member
09th Aug 2007
9
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M_Jackson Silver Member
09th Aug 2007
10
Reply message RE: Hummingbirds: SU-800 and strobes
nrothschild Silver Member
16th Jan 2008
Reply message RE: Hummingbirds: SU-800 and strobes
nrothschild Silver Member
16th Jan 2008
     Reply message RE: Hummingbirds: SU-800 and strobes
M_Jackson Silver Member
16th Jan 2008
          Reply message RE: Hummingbirds: SU-800 and strobes
nrothschild Silver Member
09th Aug 2007
11
               Reply message RE: Hummingbirds: SU-800 and strobes
M_Jackson Silver Member
09th Aug 2007
12
                    Reply message RE: Hummingbirds: SU-800 and strobes
M_Jackson Silver Member
16th Jan 2008
                         Reply message RE: Hummingbirds: SU-800 and strobes
M_Jackson Silver Member
16th Jan 2008
                              Reply message RE: Hummingbirds: SU-800 and strobes
nrothschild Silver Member
10th Aug 2007
13
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M_Jackson Silver Member
16th Jan 2008
                                        Reply message RE: Hummingbirds: SU-800 and strobes
M_Jackson Silver Member
10th Aug 2007
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nrothschild Silver Member
10th Aug 2007
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M_Jackson Silver Member
10th Aug 2007
16
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HBB Moderator
10th Aug 2007
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nrothschild Silver Member
10th Aug 2007
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10th Aug 2007
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11th Aug 2007
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HBB Moderator Hal is an expert in several areas, including CLS Awarded for his excellent article contributions to the Resources. Charter MemberTue 07-Aug-07 10:14 PM
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#1. "RE: Hummingbirds: SU-800 and strobes"
In response to Reply # 0


Phoenix, US
          

Mike:

Very nice shot! Thanks for sharing it.

Page 122 of the SB800 manual provides a table of flash duration at different power settings in the manual mode. Range extends from 1/1050 sec at M1/1 (full power) to 1/42600 sec at M1/128 (seven stops down). One of these settings may work for you.

This of course requires that the remotes be in manual mode and you will have to work out the distance, power settings, ISO, etc. at the range you are working and adjust accordingly. The use of diffusers and the zoom head function will enter into the equation as well.

Hope this helps a bit.

HBB in Phoenix, Arizona

HBB in Phoenix, Arizona
Nikonian Team Member

Photography is a journey with no conceivable destination.

  

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M_Jackson Silver Member Nikonian since 28th Oct 2005Wed 08-Aug-07 12:07 AM
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#2. "RE: Hummingbirds: SU-800 and strobes"
In response to Reply # 1


Jackson, US
          

Hi HBB,
When I control the strobes using the SU-800, is there a way to control the output duration? From what I am seeing, all I can really control is the +/- value settings on the strobe, but I think I am in TTL mode.

Now I have to go check the controller and units to see if I can still control the individual units while in Manual mode (on the flash)

Any advice would be appreciated while I am trying to figure this out.

Thanks again,
M. Jackson

M. Jackson
Jackson Hole, WY

Blog: www.bestofthetetons.com
Web Site: www.tetonimages.com

  

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michaelhager Registered since 15th Feb 2007Wed 08-Aug-07 01:34 AM
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#3. "RE: Hummingbirds: SU-800 and strobes"
In response to Reply # 2


Fountain Inn, US
          

Set the sb-800 to remote, manual. Set your commander mode on the camera to manual and chose a setting for the strobe from 1/1 to 1/128.

C. Michael Hager
Your most important piece of photo equipment is built into your face.
www.cmhager.com/Content/photo.shtml

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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M_Jackson Silver Member Nikonian since 28th Oct 2005Wed 08-Aug-07 02:28 AM
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#4. "RE: Hummingbirds: SU-800 and strobes"
In response to Reply # 3


Jackson, US
          

EDIT:
After reading your post, I went downstairs and set up a few test shots. Cool! I had only run the SU-800 in TTL up until tonight, but can now see I can control the output of all three groups of strobes from the SU-800 at the top of the camera.

Thanks!
M. Jackson

M. Jackson
Jackson Hole, WY

Blog: www.bestofthetetons.com
Web Site: www.tetonimages.com

  

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nrothschild Silver Member Neil is an expert in several areas, including camera support Nikonian since 25th Jul 2004Wed 08-Aug-07 04:14 PM
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#5. "RE: Hummingbirds: SU-800 and strobes"
In response to Reply # 4


US
          

I'd be interested in any comments regarding the R200 mini strobe. I also shoot Hummers and other birds. I have an SB-800 and shortly will have another SB-800 or probably SB600. The low cost of the R-200 is attractive - with flash brackets and other things, this hobby is getting expensive . They are very limited in power so I was curious about your general thoughts, in the context of your Hummer shooting (and any other nature shooting you may do).

Very nice image in the first post!

Neil

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Neil


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M_Jackson Silver Member Nikonian since 28th Oct 2005Wed 08-Aug-07 05:15 PM
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#6. "RE: Hummingbirds: SU-800 and strobes"
In response to Reply # 5


Jackson, US
          

I like the little R-200 units. I bought an adapter at Really Right Stuff so it can mount on about any thing, but it comes with a handy little base plate that can handle most 1/4 stud mounts. I also bought a flash bracket from Really Right Stuff, so I can add additional flash holders and another R-200 units later if I think I will ever need it. Actually, they put out quite a bit of light, but nothing like the SB-800. The down side is the dedicated little battery. I am not aware of any rechargables for that size.

For the hummers, I have the R-200 mounted a couple of feet below the anticipated bird hovering zone to light up his throat or gorget. It seems to be working fine and is a lot less expensive than a full SB-800 unit.

I only have one SD-8a battery pack right now, but would like to add a couple more in the future. That's the main reason I went with SB-800 units over SB-600 units.

Good luck!
M. Jackson

M. Jackson
Jackson Hole, WY

Blog: www.bestofthetetons.com
Web Site: www.tetonimages.com

  

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nrothschild Silver Member Neil is an expert in several areas, including camera support Nikonian since 25th Jul 2004Wed 08-Aug-07 05:25 PM
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#7. "RE: Hummingbirds: SU-800 and strobes"
In response to Reply # 6


US
          

Thanks for the comments.

In rethinking the pricing, the SB-600 is only $23 more than the R200. That's pretty much a push to me. The R200 would have the advantage of lighter weight, which I think might be helpful, especially handheld for insect shooting.

I actually bought a 20 or 25 pack of the CR123a online somewhere very cheaply when I almost ordered an R1 kit, but then reconsidered. I think I paid around $1.50 ea., including shipping. Never opened the pack of course so I have no idea of the quality.

I found this (rechargeable CR123a) on an internet search:

http://www.batteryjunction.com/recrbachrc.html?gclid=CLuO37PD5o0CFReQGgod8Vuizg

Any rechargebable Li based battery is a different bird; I would personally research it before trying it, assuming I had a need. Speedlights put a huge drain on the battery when they recycle; this is atypical of a lot of uses for these things, and that would be the basis for concern. Li based batteries are used extensively in the model airplane hobby; they need very high discharge rates although they do that with much larger cells; multiple Amp-hour ratings are very common for that application.

Neil

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Neil


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M_Jackson Silver Member Nikonian since 28th Oct 2005Wed 08-Aug-07 10:01 PM
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#8. "RE: Hummingbirds: SU-800 and strobes"
In response to Reply # 7


Jackson, US
          

Neil,
Remember the R200 is a "dumb" remote strobe. You can't use it as a flash on the top of the camera without some sort of connector (RRS adapter and flash bracket), and it must be fired by either a camera with Commander mode, an SB-800, or SU-800. (I can't remember if a SB-600 can run as a commander, and I don't own one to check). It is definitely a cute little strobe, but it has some limits. I will probably add another one someday, but will probably wait and by the R1 full kit, sans SU-800 which I already have.

You'd have to do some research, but not all micro lenses are compatible with the R1C1 system. I assume it has to do with all the weight at the end of the lense, but also whether the lense rotates as it is zoomed or focused.

M. Jackson



M. Jackson
Jackson Hole, WY

Blog: www.bestofthetetons.com
Web Site: www.tetonimages.com

  

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nrothschild Silver Member Neil is an expert in several areas, including camera support Nikonian since 25th Jul 2004Thu 09-Aug-07 12:22 AM
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#9. "RE: Hummingbirds: SU-800 and strobes"
In response to Reply # 8


US
          

Well, I picked up a 2nd SB-800 today. The SB600 cannot be used as the master, but since I have an SB800 that wasn't an issue. I played with the SB600 in the shop, and decided that since I never really clicked with the Sb800 (after 3 years, I am comfortable with it- I may be slow but not totally stupid ), I didn't need another flash interface to deal with. It was just too different. I'm sure I could adjust, but I think it's better to have multiples of the same. And that goes for all the other minor feature differences.

My thinking with the R200 would be for limited use; maybe top lighting or some application where a lightweight flash might be better. But after considering the $35 difference between that and the SB600, that probably wouldn't make sense either. If I consider an SB600 for a 3rd flash, I'll go down the same thought stream I went through today, and probably end up with a 3rd SB800

I do have an old SB24 that is still working like new. I might try to put a peanut slave on it to make it productive. I don't mind setting manual exposures as long as I don't have to keep a group of dissimilar flashes in sync.

Actually my 105 AF-D Micro is very well set up for the R1 system. The outer barrell has a 62mm male thread. I have used that thread to hold a Sigme EM-140 ring flash head. Works very well. The newer 105 VR doesn't have that outer thread on the barrel. Not sure how that attaches; the pdf docs on Nikon's site are not all updated for that lens. I think the R1 manual lists the 105 AF-D as supporting up to 4 R200's, which is the most they list for any lenses.

_________________________________
Neil


my Nikonians gallery.

  

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M_Jackson Silver Member Nikonian since 28th Oct 2005Thu 09-Aug-07 02:49 AM
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#10. "RE: Hummingbirds: SU-800 and strobes"
In response to Reply # 9


Jackson, US
          

I took a photo class with at the local art center a few years ago. The instructor offer to loan me one of his four SB-800s for a few days. I was surprised anyone would need or want four units. After having three for a while, I can see why four would be good, or a dozen would be even better!

Once you get over the sting of the new SB-800, I'd suggest picking up an SU-800. They are one of the most nifty additions I made to my set up in the past year. The main reason I did it a the time was to stop my 7 week old golden retriever from blinking on the pre-flashes. The SU-800 stopped that problem instantly, then freed up the SB-800 I was using to control the other two. The D200 cameras have a built in Commander, but using a SB-800 or SU-800 is so much easier to use.

Congratulations on the extra new strobe!
M. Jackson

M. Jackson
Jackson Hole, WY

Blog: www.bestofthetetons.com
Web Site: www.tetonimages.com

  

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nrothschild Silver Member Neil is an expert in several areas, including camera support Nikonian since 25th Jul 2004Wed 16-Jan-08 01:19 PM
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"RE: Hummingbirds: SU-800 and strobes"


US
          

Hi Mike,

I think there is another variable in your question of how to freeze the wings. Here is an image I shot in 2004. Here is a link to a larger verion:

http://www.pbase.com/nrothschild/image/32276923

You can back up from that image and see some other Hummer work I did that summer.

I got the impression at the time that in order to freeze the wings, and get such sharp feather detail on the body, that I had to shoot well under the ambient light. That was not hard for me because I have to shoot facing South at my feeder so I never get good sunlight on the bird. I lose a nice ambient fuzzy background and get the dark background you see here. That seemed to be the trade-off. Your exposure (F/4 1/160s) appears to be at least very close to an ambient light exposure. If so, regardless of your flash speed, you are recording wing movement for the entire 1/160s exposure. You may want to try stopping down, even if you don't like my dark background, to see if that works for you.

You could also put one of your flashes on the background, and shoot stopped down. Lord knows, you have enough speedlights trained on that bird


_________________________________
Neil


my Nikonians gallery.

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nrothschild Silver Member Neil is an expert in several areas, including camera support Nikonian since 25th Jul 2004Wed 16-Jan-08 01:19 PM
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"RE: Hummingbirds: SU-800 and strobes"


US
          

The example in the previous post was, according to the notes on my site, shot with an SB-800 on camera.

This image better freezes the wings, and was shot with an SB24 on camera, and the SB800 to the lower left, I guess, in SU-4 mode.


_________________________________
Neil


my Nikonians gallery.

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M_Jackson Silver Member Nikonian since 28th Oct 2005Wed 16-Jan-08 01:19 PM
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"RE: Hummingbirds: SU-800 and strobes"


Jackson, US
          

Hi Neil,
Thanks for all the help. I spent part of the day tweaking what I learned yesterday and modifying my set up. It helped to get a nice supply of feeding hummers.

While I know I have a lot to learn on this, I managed to get a few worth viewing. Of the 120 I left on the camera, I had about 35 sharp ones, in all kinds of poses. Tomorrow I will be substituting the basic feeder with some variations of flowers to see if I can complete the scene.

I don't know if I can post three photos in one post. I may have to edit the post in a minute.

Mike Jackson


M. Jackson
Jackson Hole, WY

Blog: www.bestofthetetons.com
Web Site: www.tetonimages.com

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nrothschild Silver Member Neil is an expert in several areas, including camera support Nikonian since 25th Jul 2004Thu 09-Aug-07 04:17 PM
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#11. "RE: Hummingbirds: SU-800 and strobes"
In response to Reply # 0


US
          

Nice job freezing the wings!

Was this an ambient exposure? 1/250 F/6.3-7.1 coulg go eitgher way. Maybe you faked us out by putting a speedlight on the background

Neil

_________________________________
Neil


my Nikonians gallery.

  

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M_Jackson Silver Member Nikonian since 28th Oct 2005Thu 09-Aug-07 05:54 PM
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#12. "RE: Hummingbirds: SU-800 and strobes"
In response to Reply # 11


Jackson, US
          

No, I used four lights. I had an SB-800 on each side (A and C), an R200 below on group B, and an SB-800 on the background also on group B. I just had to move the center SB-800 up or back to get the exposure right. The remote strobes were at either 1/16 or 1/32, controlled by the SU-800.

On the shots I took this morning, I added some Lumiquest diffusers on the side strobes. They are set up only about 2' from the shooting zones. I will post a shot or two later. The photos are still in the camera, set up and ready for today's visitors.

Thanks for all the help!

Mike Jackson

M. Jackson
Jackson Hole, WY

Blog: www.bestofthetetons.com
Web Site: www.tetonimages.com

  

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M_Jackson Silver Member Nikonian since 28th Oct 2005Wed 16-Jan-08 01:19 PM
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"RE: Hummingbirds: SU-800 and strobes"


Jackson, US
          

Here's one from today.
I was shooting at 1/8 on all four strobes today.

M. Jackson

M. Jackson
Jackson Hole, WY

Blog: www.bestofthetetons.com
Web Site: www.tetonimages.com

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M_Jackson Silver Member Nikonian since 28th Oct 2005Wed 16-Jan-08 01:19 PM
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"RE: Hummingbirds: SU-800 and strobes"


Jackson, US
          

Okay, I guess I have my question about the SU-800 answered. Thanks for all the help and suggestions.

Here's one more from today. Now I need to go find some moose!

Mike Jackson
Jackson Hole, WY

M. Jackson
Jackson Hole, WY

Blog: www.bestofthetetons.com
Web Site: www.tetonimages.com

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nrothschild Silver Member Neil is an expert in several areas, including camera support Nikonian since 25th Jul 2004Fri 10-Aug-07 03:41 PM
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#13. "RE: Hummingbirds: SU-800 and strobes"
In response to Reply # 0


US
          

Nice shots! I've been shooting hummers today with my 105 AF-D micro, with a wireless remote. For starters I am just shooting them perched on the feeder- nothing dramatic. I'm just curious about this different approach. I have both SDB800's on Wimberly macro arms, shooting one master and one slave, both in SU-4 mode at 1/8 - 1/4 power depending on how I have the arms set. D200.

Reading the Sb800 manual, Nikon recommends putting the master and slave in SU-4 mode. I'm not sure why that way, verses running the master in manual mode and just letting the slave fire when it sees the light. Just curious. I know that in A mode, the slave follows the master and that syncs the slave flash time (and power) to the master, resulting in one adjustment rather than two. But in M mode, I don't see the benefit.

Edit: I am using SU-4 mode because I want to minimize, as much as possible, any pre-flashes. My master is on an SC29 cord. Otherwise I get OOF bird butts because the hummers generally don't like the flash. I haven't been doing enough shooting this year to get them acclimated (which they will if I am persistent). It would be better to use a sync cord, which may be my next accessory purchase.

Neil

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Neil


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M_Jackson Silver Member Nikonian since 28th Oct 2005Wed 16-Jan-08 01:19 PM
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"RE: Hummingbirds: SU-800 and strobes"


Jackson, US
          

Neil,
The reason I posted the original message was to learn how to use my SU-800 with the set up. Up until this thread, I had only used the TTL option with the SU-800 and hadn't learned how to set the strobes to 1/16th power from the unit. After reading the first few responses and then experimenting, it all made sense and things fell together nicely.

I believe you might want to take a different approach with two SB-800 strobes (but maybe it is the same results). You can let one of your two SB-800 units act as the commander, then set the second one to REMOTE (using the same channel and group) and let the first one control the second one. From the commander unit, set it to Manual and something like 1/32 and the remote unit to 1/32 "from" that unit. Having the commander connected to the camera with a sync cord means you have to go to the unit to make changes in the output settings. The third group would be set to --, but it wouldn't matter if you didn't have the third unit.

A D200 has a built in Commander control, so you could control both strobes from the camera. I found it to be too slow and cumbersome to have to dig into all the menus, make changes, and save each time I wanted to change the output. Another commander SB-800 or as SU-800 works much better. The SU-800 does not need to preflash.

I've only been trying to photograph the hummingbirds a couple of days, and I know there are a lot of people here with a lot more experience than me, but once they get used to feeding, I haven't seen them that put off by all the flashing strobes. Normally, they come to a feeder or flower and get their first drink. That is when I am focusing. When they back up and stop, I am usually ready to shoot and I normally get four or five shots off of one feeding. I normally prefocus on one spot, and set that spot on my 200-400 in the memory recall. Then I can manually focus any other spot if they go to a different place. When they go to the main spot, I hit the recall button and am ready to nail the shot.

The photo shows my set up, with a D200 and 200-400 in the kitchen window. Everything is controlled by the SU-800.

Good luck,


M. Jackson
Jackson Hole, WY

Blog: www.bestofthetetons.com
Web Site: www.tetonimages.com

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M_Jackson Silver Member Nikonian since 28th Oct 2005Fri 10-Aug-07 04:52 PM
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#14. "RE: Hummingbirds: SU-800 and strobes"
In response to Reply # 0


Jackson, US
          

The SB-800 near the bottom is close to the background, shooting up. The R-200 is in front of the plant stand, shooting up in hopes of catching and lighting the underside gorget. Some of that is hard to decipher in the photo. The little clamp is actually one that comes with the R1 unit to hold the plexiglass diffuser card. I bought that as a separate item and use it all the time to just hold things.

The feeder on the LEFT has scotch tape over all but one feeder flower. The live flowers are only used when I am trying to photograph, otherwise, that plant bracket has a full hummingbird feeder. When ready, I remove it and add the flowers. The birds get used to coming to one spot. Lastly, there are two small jars on the ground. They have sugar water and a small eyedropper to add to the live flowers. It will keep them at a single flower a little longer than just a natural one. A clipped live flower clump will stay crisp and rigid for about 20 minutes.

M. Jackson

M. Jackson
Jackson Hole, WY

Blog: www.bestofthetetons.com
Web Site: www.tetonimages.com

  

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nrothschild Silver Member Neil is an expert in several areas, including camera support Nikonian since 25th Jul 2004Fri 10-Aug-07 06:05 PM
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#15. "RE: Hummingbirds: SU-800 and strobes"
In response to Reply # 14


US
          

Hi Mike,

Yea, you're doing the Hollywood Movie Set deal .

I think Western hummers are different than Eastern. We only get Ruby's. People I know from the net that are out West generally have a much easier time. I once saw an image with at least a dozen hummers at one feeder. Much different here. One bird controls the feeder and he spends more energy defending the feeder than actually doing any drinking. I'm lucky to get one shot every 20-45 minutes and often get only one shot. I see more territorial defence than feeding.

Some are flash shy; I've had others that aren't. My Defender this year is very flash shy. I would have to kill him to get a replacement

(No- I don't do that)

You gave me some very good ideas; replacing a feeder with a flower and watering it with sugar solution is a great tip! I have seen that effect when I move my own feeder; I moved it 3 feet last week for a better angle and replaced it with a hanging chotchkie- the bird still goes to that garden ornament.

Good point about the SU-800 not doing pre-flashes. My Defender bird absolutely does not tolerate that. I have a bunch of OOF butts from this morning to prove it . Flash exposure is the least of my problems, though.

I am doing one light above left of shooting target and one lower right, angled up to try to catch the gorget. That is not working but I think the feeder itself is interfering; I haave a tight shooting angle.

I envy you guys with your more cooperative Western birds.

Neil






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Neil


my Nikonians gallery.

  

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M_Jackson Silver Member Nikonian since 28th Oct 2005Fri 10-Aug-07 07:57 PM
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#16. "RE: Hummingbirds: SU-800 and strobes"
In response to Reply # 15


Jackson, US
          

I am still way too new to shooting hummingbirds to make too many comments. I had feeders out all summer, but didn't start seeing many around the yard until recently. I assume part of that has to do with all the new fledglings. There is a good chance I am dealing with some of the new chicks, though I have a territorial sherrif at each feeder zone. They seem to go off for a while each day, leaving the area open for a few random birds.

Some of the strobes are only 15" to 24" away. They flinch when they go off, but usually continue feeding. The adults with the full gorget haven't been close to the house so far.

Good luck,
Mike Jackson

M. Jackson
Jackson Hole, WY

Blog: www.bestofthetetons.com
Web Site: www.tetonimages.com

  

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HBB Moderator Hal is an expert in several areas, including CLS Awarded for his excellent article contributions to the Resources. Charter MemberFri 10-Aug-07 10:11 PM
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#17. "RE: Hummingbirds: SU-800 and strobes"
In response to Reply # 15


Phoenix, US
          

Neil:

Yes, the western hummers are very aggressive when it comes to feeders. We have named the little guy that guards our feeder "Attila the Hum".

Regards,

HBB in Phoenix, Arizona

HBB in Phoenix, Arizona
Nikonian Team Member

Photography is a journey with no conceivable destination.

  

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nrothschild Silver Member Neil is an expert in several areas, including camera support Nikonian since 25th Jul 2004Fri 10-Aug-07 11:04 PM
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#18. "RE: Hummingbirds: SU-800 and strobes"
In response to Reply # 17


US
          

HBB- then why do I sometimes see pictures of a dozen birds around one feeder? I have a friend in Southern Cal that has a dozen or more hanging around. Do different species act differently? Just curious. Mybe I'll import some friendlier types

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Neil


my Nikonians gallery.

  

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HBB Moderator Hal is an expert in several areas, including CLS Awarded for his excellent article contributions to the Resources. Charter MemberFri 10-Aug-07 11:46 PM
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#19. "RE: Hummingbirds: SU-800 and strobes"
In response to Reply # 18


Phoenix, US
          

Neil:

Good question. My brother, who lives less than five miles from here, has an identical feeder and half a dozen or more of the little birds will regularly swarm around it with no signs of aggression or territorial behavior. As far as I can tell, they are the same species hanging around our feeder.

Another one of Mother Nature's mysteries.

Speaking of Mother Nature: if she were seduced by Father Time, what would the offspring be?

HBB in Phoenix, Arizona

HBB in Phoenix, Arizona
Nikonian Team Member

Photography is a journey with no conceivable destination.

  

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nrothschild Silver Member Neil is an expert in several areas, including camera support Nikonian since 25th Jul 2004Sat 11-Aug-07 12:08 AM
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#20. "RE: Hummingbirds: SU-800 and strobes"
In response to Reply # 19


US
          

HBB - very interesting. Maybe he will rent his civil birds.

Mike - I also have a very short Hummer season. I don't get regular visits until early July, and by the 1st week in September or so I think the locals have left and what little I get are migrant. It's a short season. Probably more so in Wyoming.

I have never found a nest. I'm surrounded on two sides by woods and I assume they are buried in there somewhere. I also have a couple of owls near by but never seen them. They hide in the woods too.

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Neil


my Nikonians gallery.

  

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M_Jackson Silver Member Nikonian since 28th Oct 2005Sat 11-Aug-07 03:22 AM
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#21. "RE: Hummingbirds: SU-800 and strobes"
In response to Reply # 19


Jackson, US
          

The local bird expert has a weekly column in the paper. He wrote this week of someone saying they have as many as 75 hummingbirds in their yard and often dozens on the feeders. The expert, then went on to say they were probably juveniles. I read over some hummingbird information on Moose Peterson's site, and he says most feeders will get claimed by one dominant bird. I've been seeing that here, too.

The dominant bird is the only one feeding in front of me most of the day, but it looks like I have a few others that sneak in for a quick drink when he is away.

All my bird feeders (not just hummingbird feeders) have had a surge of activity in the past couple of weeks. I am sure much of is a result of all the fledging babies out in the world. Where there were just two adults feeding a while back, there would now be five or six.


M. Jackson
Jackson Hole, WY

Blog: www.bestofthetetons.com
Web Site: www.tetonimages.com

  

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nrothschild Silver Member Neil is an expert in several areas, including camera support Nikonian since 25th Jul 2004Wed 16-Jan-08 01:19 PM
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#22. "RE: Hummingbirds: SU-800 and strobes"
In response to Reply # 21


US
          

Interesting... I guess maybe the juveniles simply inundated the area and overwhelmed the defender? hehe.

I applied your Hummer technique to my garden macro. I put a drop of sugar water in a cantelope flower. The bumble bees were following my spoon like puppies.

I'll post some hummers when I get them sorted out.

_________________________________
Neil


my Nikonians gallery.

Attachment #1, (jpg file)

  

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