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Forums Lobby MASTER YOUR TOOLS - Hardware & Software Nikon Speedlights & Lighting topic #15653
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Subject: "SB 800 and D2X" Previous topic | Next topic
ajd620 Registered since 16th Nov 2005Thu 29-Jun-06 06:40 PM
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"SB 800 and D2X"


Reading, US
          

if I am understanding the so clear and consice manual , I do not see the following set up as compatable: camera on manual metering and SB800, hot shoe set on AA (the manual recommends the camera be set on P or A aperature priority)?? Is this not supposed to work? I did a backyard test and it SEEMS to work nicely...I used matrix metering...I will also try spot metering although since the camera is set manually I do not see where this would make a difference.
ALSO...does anyone know a reference that expalins how he D2x can synch at shutter speeds higher than its hightest synch speed?...this sounds like science fiction, although I did shoot some outdoor flowers at 1/350 sec and the flash is firing??
thanks in advance
Andy

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Replies to this topic
Subject Author Message Date ID
Reply message RE: SB 800 and D2X
bclaff Silver Member
29th Jun 2006
1
Reply message RE: SB 800 and D2X
blw Moderator
02nd Jul 2006
2
     Reply message RE: SB 800 and D2X
ajd620
02nd Jul 2006
3
          Reply message RE: SB 800 and D2X
bew Silver Member
02nd Jul 2006
4
Reply message RE: SB 800 and D2X
bew Silver Member
02nd Jul 2006
5
Reply message RE: SB 800 and D2X
bclaff Silver Member
02nd Jul 2006
6
Reply message RE: SB 800 and D2X
Martin Turner Moderator
04th Jul 2006
7
     Reply message RE: SB 800 and D2X
bew Silver Member
05th Jul 2006
8

bclaff Silver Member Awarded for multiple contributions for the Resources Nikonian since 26th Oct 2004Thu 29-Jun-06 09:33 PM
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#1. "RE: SB 800 and D2X"
In response to Reply # 0


Vancouver (WA USA not Canada), US
          

Andy,

Yes, page 38 of the SB-800 Manual is misleading.
You can use any Mode that gives you control over aperture and that certainly includes Manual mode.
(Actually you can use any mode but for many situations AA makes more sense when you control the aperture.)

The D2X does have a flash sync speed of 1/250s.
But if you check page 112 of the D2X manual you'll see that you can do up to 1/800s with Auto FP High-Spped Sync.

Bill

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blw Moderator Awarded for his high level of expertise in various areas Nikonian since 18th Jun 2004Sun 02-Jul-06 09:59 AM
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#2. "RE: SB 800 and D2X"
In response to Reply # 1


Richmond, US
          

Hmm... I'm pretty certain that I've actually used FP sync at 1/4000th on my D2h, and I'd be surprised if there is a difference between the D2h and the D2x in this regard. (Or did you mean 1/8000th, which is the top speed?)

_____
Brian... a bicoastal Nikonian and Team Member

My gallery is online. Comments and critique welcomed any time!

  

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ajd620 Registered since 16th Nov 2005Sun 02-Jul-06 10:10 AM
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#3. "RE: SB 800 and D2X"
In response to Reply # 2


Reading, US
          

if the highest sync is 1/250 second, any faster shutter speed will result in the shutter partially closed before the flash fires... so what magic is Nikon using to allow synchronization at speeds higher than its maxium synch speed of 1/250 second?
Andy

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bew Silver Member Nikonian since 11th Jul 2004Sun 02-Jul-06 12:40 PM
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#4. "RE: SB 800 and D2X"
In response to Reply # 3


San Antonio, US
          

Nikon manuals do leave a lot to be desired. In the D200 manual for custom setting e1, the option is "1/250s(AutoFP)". I had to read over this part several times before it began to sink (sync? in. A better choice would be something like "HighSpeedSync".

Simply put when in this mode the speedlight will sync up to the max shutter speed of the camera. This feature is only available on the D200, D2h and D2x (or D2xs) in combination with the SB-600 or SB-800. Caution notes abound on using this method due to the way the flash fires (multiple flashes, reduced output, etc.)

Bert

  

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bew Silver Member Nikonian since 11th Jul 2004Sun 02-Jul-06 01:16 PM
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#5. "RE: SB 800 and D2X"
In response to Reply # 0


San Antonio, US
          

I wonder about the utility of High Speed Sync.

I am reminded of photos from the infancy of strobe lights where a bullet is stopped within inches of exiting from the barrel of a gun. In these cases the shutter speed was, for the most part, irrelevant. The stop action was provided by the speed of the strobe.

Where would it be necessary to use a fast shutter speed along with a fast speedlight speed? Why not a "whatever" shutter speed and let the SB do the work?

Bert

  

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bclaff Silver Member Awarded for multiple contributions for the Resources Nikonian since 26th Oct 2004Sun 02-Jul-06 01:48 PM
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#6. "RE: SB 800 and D2X"
In response to Reply # 5


Vancouver (WA USA not Canada), US
          

Bert,

With most of the cameras we use at high shutter speeds the film/sensor is not exposed all at the same time but by a slit that travels quickly over the film/sensor.
That's why one single quick burst of light won't work; it would only expose the current position of the slit on the film/sensor.
But if the speedlight is strobed quickly the entire film gets exposed to the flash.

BTW, the D70 uses an electronic shutter at these higher speeds so the 1/500s limitation is really arbitrary.
If you use a flash with a D70 at higher than 1/500s it will work fine even if it is not doing FP.

This is a minor advantage of my D70 over my D200.

I use AutoFP on my D200 when I'm shooting hand-held with a long lens and want 1/500s.

Regards,
Bill

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Martin Turner Moderator Expert professional PJ & PR photographer Nikonian since 20th Jun 2006Tue 04-Jul-06 11:18 PM
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#7. "RE: SB 800 and D2X"
In response to Reply # 5


Bidford on Avon, GB
          


>Where would it be necessary to use a fast shutter speed
>along with a fast speedlight speed? Why not a "whatever"
>shutter speed and let the SB do the work?

When using fill-in flash on portraits or group photos in bright sunlight, your unflash assisted speed at f2.8 (or whatever you are using to isolate the subject) may be 500. Clearly you need the flash to sync with that speed or you get banding on the picture. If you don't fill-in flash, you are inviting way too much contrast on facial features. Even when the sky is overcast, it's standard practice to use some fill-in flash to create attractive catch-lights.

The biggest downfall of the D100 was that it only synced up to 180 -- much too slow for a lot of press work. 250 is an improvement, but auto fp is suitable for all eventualities.

For these reasons, the reduced output is not usually a problem -- you generally use direct flash on the top of the camera, and you don't need very much of it.

M A R T I N • T U R N E R
http://art.martinturner.org.uk
http://www.martinturner.org.uk

Nikonians membership: my most important photographic investment, after the camera

My Nikonians blog, Learning from the Portrait Masters, http://blog.nikonians.org/martin_turner/

  

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bew Silver Member Nikonian since 11th Jul 2004Wed 05-Jul-06 01:30 AM
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#8. "RE: SB 800 and D2X"
In response to Reply # 7


San Antonio, US
          

Thanks Bill and Martin. That's what I enjoy so much about these forums - learning something new.

Bert

  

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