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Subject: "CP 5000....to buy or not to buy?" Previous topic | Next topic
arbor54 Basic MemberWed 13-Feb-02 12:24 AM
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"CP 5000....to buy or not to buy?"



          

I would like some educated opinions on this. As I mentioned on another post, I am very close to buying a CP 5000. However, the other day a Nikon rep told me "wait a couple of weeks, they're coming out with something new", and left it at that. I really don't want to spend much more than what I have budgeted for the 5000, but if the new thing is going to be an improvement in a similar price range, I would rather wait. Does anyone have any idea what they are going to introduce or when? Thanks for your input.

  

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Replies to this topic
Subject Author Message Date ID
Reply message RE: CP 5000....to buy or not to buy?
BJNicholls Gold Member
13th Feb 2002
1
Reply message RE: CP 5000....to buy or not to buy?
arbor54
13th Feb 2002
2
Reply message RE: CP 5000....to buy or not to buy?
nkcllewis Silver Member
13th Feb 2002
3
Reply message RE: CP 5000....to buy or not to buy?
jnscbl
13th Feb 2002
7
Reply message I bought a cheaper toy...
RRowlett Silver Member
13th Feb 2002
4
Reply message RE: I bought a cheaper toy...
Newsphotog
13th Feb 2002
5
     Reply message RE: I bought a cheaper toy...
jnscbl
13th Feb 2002
6
     Reply message RE: I bought a cheaper toy...
Newsphotog
13th Feb 2002
8
          Reply message RE: I bought a cheaper toy...
arbor54
13th Feb 2002
9
               Reply message RE: I bought a cheaper toy...
BJNicholls Gold Member
13th Feb 2002
10
     Reply message Lens adapters on digicams...
RRowlett Silver Member
14th Feb 2002
12
Reply message RE: CP 5000....to buy or not to buy?
Woodchuck
13th Feb 2002
11
Reply message RE: CP 5000....to buy or not to buy?
Newsphotog
14th Feb 2002
13
Reply message RE: CP 5000....to buy or not to buy?
michael1597
21st Feb 2002
14
Reply message RE: CP 5000....to buy or not to buy?
michael1597
21st Feb 2002
15

BJNicholls Gold Member Awarded for his contributions to the community and the Resources Charter MemberWed 13-Feb-02 01:05 AM
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#1. "RE: CP 5000....to buy or not to buy?"
In response to Reply # 0


Salt Lake City, US
          

There are other cameras I'd personally buy now at the 5000's pricepoint, but I'm quite curious about what the Nikon rep was implying. I can't imagine that Nikon planned a new model that would eclipse the CP 5000 only a couple of months after its debut at retail stores. I would only guess that Nikon might slipstream in some revisions to the current model that fix some of the shortcomings that have been criticized in reviews.

If Nikon does announce a totally new camera at the upcoming tradeshows, I wouldn't expect it to be delivered until summertime. That's a long time to wait with no camera.

In the digital camera market, if you wait a couple of weeks *somebody* will come out with a new camera .

BJ


BJ

Zenfolio gallery

  

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arbor54 Basic MemberWed 13-Feb-02 01:20 AM
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#2. "RE: CP 5000....to buy or not to buy?"
In response to Reply # 1



          

He was very vague and cryptic to say the least. I couldn't figure out what he was trying to convey. Mentioned it may be a lower end camera, then said he wasn't sure like he regretted even bringing it up. From what I have seen on other posts here, maybe it's a digital body priced lower than a D-1 that will accept Nikon lenses??? Thanks for your input BJ, can you email me regarding the other cameras you would consider in the 5000's price range?

  

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nkcllewis Silver Member Charter MemberWed 13-Feb-02 02:55 AM
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#3. "RE: CP 5000....to buy or not to buy?"
In response to Reply # 2


Washington, US
          

I had a CP5000 for a little over a month. It was fun but the lag time was just too great for candids of my kids. It was also extremely slow (30 seconds) to write the .tif 5 megapixel file, so I ended up using the .jpg "fine" mode almost exclusively. Well, it turns out that the Canon Powershot G-2 for less money provides as good an image at the "fine" mode level. Secondly, if you believe dpreview.com, the CP 5000 lens simply suck compared to the Carl Zeiss Sony, and even the cheaper Powershot Canon G-2.
I also didn't care for the CP5000's inability to autofocus in a normally lit room. Since there is no autofocus assist light on the CP5000 it simply can't focus very well except in bright light. I really didn't like it either that Nikon advertised and even put in their manual that one could deactivate the internal flash with an SB-28 or SB50 attached. So, if you ever wanted to fire strobes, forget it since the stupid software would require the CP5000 to always fire a pre-flash to set up the proper white balance.

There were some other issues, minor ones, but still anoying. All in all, for the same money as a CP 5000, one can get a brand new F100 and 50mm f/1.8 lens. Or, take a chunk out of the cost of a 17-35 f/2.8.

As for what is to come, my guess is that it will be an N80 digital, similar to the new Fuji S2 that is coming out this fall. If I were to do it again, I'd go for the Sony F/707 or the Canon Powershot G2 at this time.

Kent

Visit my Nikonians gallery.



"A poor worker always blames his tools" Anonymous

  

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jnscbl Basic MemberWed 13-Feb-02 03:26 PM
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#7. "RE: CP 5000....to buy or not to buy?"
In response to Reply # 1


US
          

BJ,

very objective and informative reply. Wise advice, too. Better or worse, digital is a different medium from film, and which camera you buy is unimportant, really. The learning curve begins when you make the purchase.
-scott

--scott

"I am always doing that which I cannot do, in order that I may learn how to do it."
Pablo Picasso

  

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RRowlett Silver Member Charter MemberWed 13-Feb-02 03:30 AM
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#4. "I bought a cheaper toy..."
In response to Reply # 0


Hamilton, US
          

...to entertain me while I wait for an affordable digital 35 mm-style body. The downsides of all the compact digicams are:

1. Shutter lag-this will drive you crazy if you are used to SLRs
2. Lens quality-the built-in 3X zoom digicam lenses CAN be quite sharp, but the distortion is really annoying compared to, say, a Nikkor SLR zoom lens. The manufacturing cost is certainly not going in to the lenses on these cameras-I presume it's in the CCD and processing hardware. Once you buy the camera, you can't fix it or replace it with a better lens.
3. Lens interchangability-just not practical. You're basically stuck with the equivalent of a 35-105mm focal length range with the stock lens. That removes quite a bit of versatility. You can buy the clunky extension tubes and adapter lenses, but these things look kludgy, and I bet the optical performance is kludgy, too. And you want the 35 mm equivalent of a 300 mm focal length? Fuhgeddaboutit!

So I bought an Olympus 3040Z (3.3 Mpixel, very compact) to explore digital imaging quirks until I can purchase something that is the digital equivalent on an N80 or F100. I recognize that these digicams are very fun, but they are also limited in many ways.

Cheers.

  

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Newsphotog Basic MemberWed 13-Feb-02 02:33 PM
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#5. "RE: I bought a cheaper toy..."
In response to Reply # 4


Toronto, CA
          

I've only had my CP5K for just over a week so my input here is minimal if not useless

My response is primarily to the first post regarding lag time and focusing issues.
I have to agree with the focusing in low light situations, I would have so say that it focuses adequately in regularly lit rooms.
Perhaps a lack of experience is using the selectable focus areas contribute to this. Being able to focus on 5 different areas within the viewfinder enables you focus almost specifically where you need it to. If not, use the AF lock button. This whole world of autofocus is new to me because I ALWAYS use manual focus on all of my 35mm photography. Use the tools supplied to you on these technological marvels and they will work. Nikon can't please everyone all of the time so there will be somebody somewhere that can't focus in low light, or the shutter lag time is too much.

I've made a point of reading all of the reviews available to date and found that the downfalls of this model are far less than what would make me choose not to purchase this unit.
Like I said, I've only had it a week and am still working the small things into the way I normally shoot. The viewfinder is small, the overall size and weight of it is small. The lense is small. The quality and file sizes are BIG, that's what I bought it for.

This is the first digicam to come out with a 28mm widest aperture with the ability to be converted to 19mm. So what if you have to add a lense?? You change lenses on 35mm, so what's the difference?

I'm pleased with mine so far. Maybe it's my inexperience. But I know what I wanted in a digital camera, and this fit the bill.

My most important suggestion......do your research BEFORE you buy. All of the details are there for you to make a decision.

Hope my 2 cents helps a bit.

John
Toronto, Canada



John
Toronto, Canada

www.sportsshooter.com/johnriddell
www.torontofirephotos.ca

  

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jnscbl Basic MemberWed 13-Feb-02 03:17 PM
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#6. "RE: I bought a cheaper toy..."
In response to Reply # 5


US
          

John,

good point about your inexperience. Some of the complaints about non-interchangeable lens digicams, compared to 35mm SLR's, remind me of a newlywed complaining that his bride can't cook as well as his mom.

Film is going to be around for quite awhile, and some will never switch. That's OK. There are magnificent color slide and color negative films today that were unimaginable a few years ago, yet some prefer to shoot B&W, and always will. That's OK, too.

About "shutterlag"...try switching to continuous autofocus. Sometimes it helps.
-scott

--scott

"I am always doing that which I cannot do, in order that I may learn how to do it."
Pablo Picasso

  

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Newsphotog Basic MemberWed 13-Feb-02 04:38 PM
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#8. "RE: I bought a cheaper toy..."
In response to Reply # 6


Toronto, CA
          

Thanks for the tip on the continuous autofocus. I did notice a difference when I had it on. One ofthe complaints about this camera was the sub-standard battery life. A couple of items contribute to this. Constantly using the LCD panel to compose and review pictures right away eat awat at battery life like crazy. Unfortunately, this is your only option when using adapter lenses because you can't use the actual viewfinder to compose. The other factor is the continuous autofocus is happening even when you do not have the AF lock button pressed or when you finger is not on the shutter button.

I was in a quiet room playing with the cam when I heard this constant motor sound that was very familiar to a lense focusing. I did an experiment where I stopped moving the camera and the motor stopped.
I moved the camera around and it sounded like it was trying to focus on everything it saw through the lense as I moved it around. This will eat the batteries in no time. I changed focus modes to single and it stopped immediately.

My solution to this will be getting the add-on battery grip which I had on order anyway, but these extra items for this model seem to be in quite high demend. Still waiting. I expect it to help in battery life and then I can change back to continuous and it will speed up focus time, which adds to shutter lag.

John

John
Toronto, Canada

www.sportsshooter.com/johnriddell
www.torontofirephotos.ca

  

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arbor54 Basic MemberWed 13-Feb-02 04:57 PM
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#9. "RE: I bought a cheaper toy..."
In response to Reply # 8



          

Thanks for all the feedback......Having always been a Nikon man (love my F5) this is difficult, but after reading the detailed review of the Sony F707 at digital photography review, I'm most likely going with the Sony. Doesn't seem to have any of the drawbacks of the 5000, and the optics sound WAY superior. Much longer battery life, better focal range, too many +'s to ignore.

  

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BJNicholls Gold Member Awarded for his contributions to the community and the Resources Charter MemberWed 13-Feb-02 05:43 PM
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#10. "RE: I bought a cheaper toy..."
In response to Reply # 9


Salt Lake City, US
          

The Sony's one of the camera's I'd recommend. It has a lot going for it in performance and handling, plus Sony's Infolithium batteries are excellent for digital camera applications. The main drawback for me is the lack of a hotshoe, it just has an accessory shoe. The camera only supports Sony's dedicated flash units that connect to the camera via a dedicated connector, not with conventional contacts on the base of the flash. If you don't have other flash units as I do, you could overlook this incompatibility. The Sony memory sticks used to be a concern, but Sony has really gotten the format out and supported in a big way, so it's not a big deal unless you already own media like compact flash that you want to use.

The Canon G2 would likely be my choice if I needed to buy right now, but that's based on its fit for my needs and uses. It's certainly a worthwhile option to consider. The Coolpix 5000 would seem to be a more logical choice for working with my Speedlights, but the non-ttl sensor is poorly located (easy to block either accidentally or when you mount an accessory to the lens). It also has a preflash that you can't disable. Perhaps Nikon will fix this in future firmware. I hope so because it really kills most studio uses of the camera.

I'll even second the mention of the Olympus 3040 as an option. It doesn't have the versatile articulating LCD, but it offers fine performance at the price.

Be sure to compare your needs with the strengths and weaknesses of any camera. Best luck!

BJ

BJ

Zenfolio gallery

  

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RRowlett Silver Member Charter MemberThu 14-Feb-02 12:27 AM
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#12. "Lens adapters on digicams..."
In response to Reply # 5


Hamilton, US
          

I think the principal difference between changing lenses on an interchangeable lens body (like a 35 mm SLR) and adding an accessory (converter) lens to a fixed lens body is...optical quality. There is just no way that adding a 0.45X or 1.5X converter lens on an extension tube in front of a fixed zoom lens is going to have the same optical quality as a dedicated wide-angle zoom or prime SLR lens. This quality may meet the needs of some and not at all of others. It's a recognized limitation, no more, no less. And the CP5000 (and all the other digicams of this type) is quite limited in the long focal length range.

I think if I were going to design a "quasi-professional" compact digicam from scratch (fantasy time here), I would seriously think about how to put interchangeable lenses on it. It's just too hard to build a 24-400mm do-it-all zoom without serious compromises. (Even as I say that I marvel at how Sony made that 10X zoom on my laboratory digicam. I think a low-res 1.6 Mpixel sensor must be able to cover up a multitude of optical sins.) Having a selection of lenses would give the serious digicam artist all the flexibility we associate with today's SLR systems. And there is no real reason why the digicam of the future has to look at all like an SLR. A TTL viewfinder is not really necessary with a digital monitor on the back of the camera.

I won't deny that the CP5000 is an incredibly fun and capable package, but there are functional limitations compared to SLR technology. This may or may not be an important consideration depending on one's applications. As they say, "your mileage may vary." I'm still waiting for the affordable Nikon D80.

Cheers.

  

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Woodchuck Registered since 13th Feb 2002Wed 13-Feb-02 10:17 PM
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#11. "RE: CP 5000....to buy or not to buy?"
In response to Reply # 0



          

I have also been hearing rumours about a NIkon N80 Digital, i really really hope this is true and also that it is at a reasonable price. I mean can you imagine if they coul get a Digital N80 with at least 5mp at around $1000. I know there would be tons of people lining up to buy one including me. I just bought a Minolta S304 which is a nice little digital but i'd sell in a second to get a digital slr. Canon has a relatviely cheap one in the D30 why is Nikon always behind in the field. Its time they picked up the ball tech wise and ran with it. As for the Coolpix5000, i thought about buyiing it, but its not worth it for the money, get the new Canon G2 or Minolta Dimage 7, or Minolta S404, or better yet wait a couple of weeks and listen for any miracles from Nikon.

  

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Newsphotog Basic MemberThu 14-Feb-02 02:32 PM
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#13. "RE: CP 5000....to buy or not to buy?"
In response to Reply # 11


Toronto, CA
          

Like they say, if it fits what you need, then buy it. I bought it. I waited too long for Nikon to produce a digital that would use my lenses. The 5k came out that would produce very comparable images to the D1's.
I'm digital now, I didn't break the bank. I don't have to worry about dusty CCD's from changing lenses on what would be my only body.
I can also take this out socially and not look like I'm covering a major news event like I do with my F100 with an SB 28 and 20-35 lense attached just for a party or gathering.

I haven't noticed any drawbacks to make me regret purchasing it.
That story may change if Nikon releases a digital N80 for the same, or nearly the same price as the CP5K!

John
Toronto, Canada

John
Toronto, Canada

www.sportsshooter.com/johnriddell
www.torontofirephotos.ca

  

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michael1597 Thu 21-Feb-02 10:55 AM

  
#14. "RE: CP 5000....to buy or not to buy?"
In response to Reply # 0



          

Well now we know, I think...D100, 6.1 mps midrange digital SLR based on f80 and f100.

I wonder if that is what he was implying about.

Michael

  

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michael1597 Thu 21-Feb-02 10:59 AM

  
#15. "RE: CP 5000....to buy or not to buy?"
In response to Reply # 0



          

Reasons to buy:

small carrying frame and light weight
5 mps and 2/3 imager
allows wide angle to ultra wide angle shooting
option to use TCE2/3 and shoot effectively at 300mm
3 aspherical lens design and Nikon glass
highly photographic images

I forgot about the Sony due to its size, graininess, noise and off colour balance.

I did not bother about the G2 due to its heavy weight, lower effective mps and soft images out of the camera/printer.

The 5000 costs more but has more intrinsic quality unless you are
prepared to stretch to an Oly E20, which is a good alternative.

Michael



  

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