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Forums Lobby GET TO KNOW YOUR CAMERA & MASTER IT Nikon D60/D50/D40 (Public) topic #974
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Subject: "Winter photography Advice" Previous topic | Next topic
ved50 Registered since 28th Oct 2005Thu 08-Dec-05 04:52 PM
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"Winter photography Advice"


Boise, US
          

Greetings to All. With cold weather outside, I was really wondering how do I really work out clicking a winter scene (snow etc...)with my D50. Doing so, I heard that moisture on the lens is really a problem in these weather conditions. I seek my fellow nikonians's suggestions in this regard.

Is there a special cover that I can enclose my D50 against these weather odds?.

-vedanth

veda

  

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Aleks Registered since 29th Oct 2005Thu 08-Dec-05 06:48 PM
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#1. "RE: Winter photography Advice"
In response to Reply # 0


Calgary, CA
          

I've used all my digital cameras in all sorts of bad weather for hours, and have never had a problem! I've even had to "dry out" my older Toshiba after shooting perspective shots in the rain for a few hours....I've never had a camera quit, take bad pics, or function incorrectly

D80 | MB-D80 Grip | Nikkor 50mm f1.8D | Nikkor 85mm f1.8D | Nikkor 18-70mm f 3.5/4.6G ED | Nikkor 70-300mm f 4/5.6G ED | Tamron 90mm f 2.8 Macro | Nikon SB-600

  

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nickschneider Registered since 02nd Dec 2005Mon 12-Dec-05 03:40 PM
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#2. "RE: Winter photography Advice"
In response to Reply # 1


Guelph, CA
          

In some siutations, if you're moving between 2 completely different temperature/moisture regimes (warm humid interior to cold/dry exterior) then let your camera acclimatize (inside of a bakcpack or bag) for 10-15 minutes before using it. But depending on where you live and how cold it gets, this may not be necessary.

-Nick

  

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skrol Registered since 23rd Oct 2003Tue 13-Dec-05 04:29 AM
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#3. "RE: Winter photography Advice"
In response to Reply # 0


US
          

When you come inside to a warmer more humid environment, you will likely get condensation on the cold camera and lens. Take a plastic bag outside with you that is big enough to fit the camera and lens into. A large zip-lock works great. Before you come inside, place the camera and lens in the bag and seal it. Condensation will form on the outside of the bag but not on the camera. Leave the camera in the bag until it gets to room temperature.

  

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lucas2840 Registered since 11th Mar 2004Tue 13-Dec-05 04:43 AM
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#4. "RE: Winter photography Advice"
In response to Reply # 0


Omaha, US
          

Thought I'd offer my two cents worth as well. The way I've always done it was to keep the camera outside of your jacket and the battery inside a pocket next to the body. By keeping the camera outside it stays the same temperature as whats outside so you shouldnt have to worry about condensation on the lens, I've also heard that sensors work better when cold (less noise). keeping the battery in an inside pocket until your ready to shoot will keep it warm so you'll get more life out of it. Course, all this is kinda difficult to do if your shooting candid, but for landscape photography it should work well.

P.S. when you take a camera indoors after shooting outside for a while or taking the camera out into the cold when its warm, DONT take the lens off until the camera is the same temperature as the surroundings, condensation is the last thing you want inside your camera!

D50
24-120mm VR ED Lens
80-200mm f/2.8 2 touch
18-70mm DX ED Lens
60mm f/2.8 Micro Nikkor
SB-600 x 2/SU-800/SB-800

  

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Forums Lobby GET TO KNOW YOUR CAMERA & MASTER IT Nikon D60/D50/D40 (Public) topic #974 Previous topic | Next topic