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Forums Lobby MASTER YOUR NIKON CAMERA Nikon D60/D50/D40 (Public) topic #29894
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Subject: "'r05' text - D60 occasional shutter release failure" Previous topic | Next topic
mrshift   Bristol, UK  Registered since 28th Jun 2008 Sat 28-Jun-08 11:05 PM
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"'r05' text - D60 occasional shutter release failure"



Hi guys,

After some brief research, Iíve discovered the Ďr05í error message isnít really an error message, although I could be forgiven for thinking that, as it appears on the occasions when the shutter stubbornly refuses to release. It focuses OK, but thereís no acknowledging beep and the D60 just sits there, inert. It could be a strange coincidence, but sometimes by adjusting the zoom the D60 then cooperates and takes the photograph. (The camera itself nearly ended up being thrown from the top of an Austrian cliff after several of these failures, and some highly-frustrating missed shots.)

So, Iíve heard several solutions, but nothing definitive, so in no particular order, Iíll share what Iíve learnt to see if any stand out from peopleís experience more than others:


  1. Metering or Focus Mode. Are there any settings which are known to provoke this Ďrefusal to shootí issue?
  2. Clean contacts. Iíve given the contacts on the body and lens several good goings-over, apparently to no avail.
  3. Speed of the memory card. Iím currently using the FujiFilm 60x 2Gb card that came with the camera Ė would this deemed to be too slow?
  4. Get official Nikon intervention. I might phone them tomorrow, and while their customer service was actually pretty good (from my experience), Iím not in a rush to parcel it all up as Iíve already had to send my older D70s back after the shutter release motor went. If thereís a quick fix here to avoid this, Iím all ears.

Well, thanks for reading, itís appreciated Ė I just need to know my D60 does what itís told and takes a shot when I need to!

Much obliged,

Andy.

  

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Replies to this topic
Subject Author Message Date ID
Reply message RE: 'r05' text - D60 occasional shutter release failure ruca2k8
29th Jun 2008
1
Reply message RE: 'r05' text - D60 occasional shutter release failure blw Moderator Awarded for his high level of expertise in various areas
29th Jun 2008
2
Reply message RE: 'r05' text - D60 occasional shutter release failure ruca2k8
30th Jun 2008
3
Reply message RE: 'r05' text - D60 occasional shutter release failure mrshift
30th Jun 2008
4
Reply message RE: 'r05' text - D60 occasional shutter release failure FE Fan
01st Jul 2008
5
Reply message RE: 'r05' text - D60 occasional shutter release failure mrshift
01st Jul 2008
8
     Reply message RE: 'r05' text - D60 occasional shutter release failure FE Fan
02nd Jul 2008
10
Reply message RE: 'r05' text - D60 occasional shutter release failure Scotty Silver Member
01st Jul 2008
6
     Reply message RE: 'r05' text - D60 occasional shutter release failure FE Fan
01st Jul 2008
7
     Reply message RE: 'r05' text - D60 occasional shutter release failure mrshift
01st Jul 2008
9

ruca2k8   Cascais, PT  Registered since 27th Feb 2008 Sun 29-Jun-08 04:22 AM
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#1. "RE: 'r05' text - D60 occasional shutter release failure"
In response to Reply # 0



AFAIK, r05 means you have room for 5 pics in the camera's buffer memory, used especially when shooting in continuous mode (bursts, sequences).

>It focuses OK,
>but there’s no acknowledging beep

I have my beep off (personally hate it) but if you have it on and there's no beep, you're not in focus.

>and the D60 just sits there,
>inert.

As it should. I think the D40-series only shoots when focus has locked or allows OOF when in continuous. Manual focus overrides this, naturally.

>It could be a strange coincidence, but sometimes by
>adjusting the zoom the D60 then cooperates and takes the
>photograph.

Might acquire focus when you move it.

Rui

  

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blw Moderator Awarded for his high level of expertise in various areas   Richmond, US  Nikonian since 18th Jun 2004 Sun 29-Jun-08 04:29 AM
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#2. "RE: 'r05' text - D60 occasional shutter release failure"
In response to Reply # 0



I don't think there is anything wrong with the camera.

The r05 message is telling you that there are 5 frames remaining in your in-camera buffer. It's always there (or another number, such as r03), but perhaps you're seeing it only when the shutter doesn't fire because you're looking for some indication.

The fact that it's r05, meaning 5 frames remaining, confirms that #3 cannot be the issue. If it were too slow and could not keep up, you'd see r00, meaning that there are 0 frames remaining in the buffer.

The real issue is that you're not getting the camera in a position that it can confirm focus. Since the default setting is to only fire the shutter when focus is confirmed, you're not getting the shutter to release. This is confirmed by the fact that you're not getting the acknowledging beep. Why it's not getting a focus lock is a matter of conjecture, but it's pretty certain why the shutter isn't firing given what you've said above.

There are several common reasons not to get to focus lock, none of which could reasonably be confirmed without either samples or more discussion:

- you're too close, and the lens cannot focus so far in.
- the contrast in the selected AF bracket is too low to permit lock on
- the light is too dim and/or the maximum aperture of the lens in use is too small (higher numbers) to allow the AF system to work well.
- there is something on the lens or the filter that interferes; this can easily happen, for example, when water gets on the front.
- a variation of the above is that it's dark and the focus assist light is not coming on (or is being blocked by the user's hand - don't ask how I'd know about this one).
- you may not be using one of the cross-sensors (I don't recall how many or what sort of AF sensors the D60 has, but most of the cameras have a cross-sensor in the center and some horizontal or vertical ones elsewhere; the higher models also have some more cross-sensors generally in the middle of the frame). If you're using a vertical sensor and have a vertical contrast line through it, it may not be recognized as easily as if a horizontal contrast line went through it.

You'll note that I mentioned samples, and I'm sure you're thinking "so how the #### do I get samples if the ######g shutter won't go off?" The answer is that there is a setting - and I don't know where it is in the D60 menus - that sets the camera to prefer frame rate over focus lock. If you can't find it, or if you're just in a hurry, I believe that using the AF-C focus setting also allows the shutter to release whether or not the subject is deemed in focus.

_____
Brian... a bicoastal Nikonian and Team Member

My gallery is online. Comments and critique welcomed any time!

  

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ruca2k8   Cascais, PT  Registered since 27th Feb 2008 Mon 30-Jun-08 01:14 PM
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#3. "RE: 'r05' text - D60 occasional shutter release failure"
In response to Reply # 2



>The answer is that there is a
>setting - and I don't know where it is in the D60 menus - that
>sets the camera to prefer frame rate over focus lock. If you
>can't find it, or if you're just in a hurry, I believe that
>using the AF-C focus setting also allows the shutter to
>release whether or not the subject is deemed in focus.

Somebody correct me: I've found that the camera will never shoot unless it has, at some time, locked focus. In AF-C and continuous shooting it will fire, tryong to "get into" focus if it's out. But in order to fire the first shot, focus HAD to lock.

I know higher-end cameras allow complete SHUTTER-priority override against FOCUS-priority but not so in the D40-range.

I've found this to happen but if there is a menu hidden somewhere, I'd like to find out.

Rui

  

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mrshift   Bristol, UK  Registered since 28th Jun 2008 Mon 30-Jun-08 06:33 PM
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#4. "RE: 'r05' text - D60 occasional shutter release failure"
In response to Reply # 0



Thanks for the pointers guys; as I said, it's appreciated.

Specifically to blw, and the suggestions you raise, I can address most of them:

- you're too close, and the lens cannot focus so far in.

Itís not this. I was taking landscape shots, albeit in reasonably cloudy conditions.

- the contrast in the selected AF bracket is too low to permit lock on

Ok, Iíll admit Iím only an amateur, so Iíll leave this one for now.

- the light is too dim and/or the maximum aperture of the lens in use is too small (higher numbers) to allow the AF system to work well.

As noted, these were landscape shots in the clear light of day, on several separate occasions. I made tweaks to the zoom, and of two shots that did take, both were at F/10, for 1/250th sec., with an (auto) ISO of 125.

- there is something on the lens or the filter that interferes; this can easily happen, for example, when water gets on the front.

Iíd given the lens, filters and contacts a good clean, and otherwise itís in the case. Pretty sure no foreign objects in sight.

- a variation of the above is that it's dark and the focus assist light is not coming on (or is being blocked by the user's hand - don't ask how I'd know about this one).

Ok, I wonít ask! My hand wasnít blocking anything though, as some of these shots were attempted on a tripod Ė the only part I was physically touching was the shutter release itself.

- you may not be using one of the cross-sensors (I don't recall how many or what sort of AF sensors the D60 has, but most of the cameras have a cross-sensor in the center and some horizontal or vertical ones elsewhere; the higher models also have some more cross-sensors generally in the middle of the frame). If you're using a vertical sensor and have a vertical contrast line through it, it may not be recognized as easily as if a horizontal contrast line went through it.

Again, youíre losing me with this one, as Iím kind of new to my D60, but I can have a look into this one and report back once Iíve got some hard facts.

Guess this one isnít as easy as I thought it would be! Thanks both for your thoughts so far.

  

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FE Fan   Silver Spring, US  Registered since 18th Oct 2004 Tue 01-Jul-08 02:45 AM
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#5. "RE: 'r05' text - D60 occasional shutter release failure"
In response to Reply # 4



I'd start off by assessing the impact (if any) of the filer(s) you mentioned you were using.

Was the filter by chance a polarizer (since you were shooting landscapes on a sunny day)?

Are you sure it is a circular polarizer (sometimes shown as CPL)? Circular polarizers play nice with auto focus, whereas old-style linear polarizers don't.

Also, did you stack filters - for example, place a skylight filter over a polarizer?

Most importantly, does the problem repeat itself without the filters attached?

Bart
D300s D40 F3HP FE FM2n Nikkormat FTN

Everything is a subject. Every subject has a rhythm. To feel it is the raison d'Ítre.
The photograph is a fixed moment of such a raison d'Ítre, which lives on in itself.
- Andre Kertesz


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mrshift   Bristol, UK  Registered since 28th Jun 2008 Tue 01-Jul-08 06:02 PM
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#8. "RE: 'r05' text - D60 occasional shutter release failure"
In response to Reply # 5



Thanks Bart -

Was the filter by chance a polarizer (since you were shooting landscapes on a sunny day)?

Are you sure it is a circular polarizer (sometimes shown as CPL)? Circular polarizers play nice with auto focus, whereas old-style linear polarizers don't.

Excellent point - I just had a look to see which polariser I was using, and realised the rookie error I'd made. What I thought was a polariser was in fact only my Nikon 67mm Neutral Colour filter. Looks like it's a trip to Jessops this weekend. Thanks for the circular polariser tip - guess every day's a schoolday!

Also, did you stack filters - for example, place a skylight filter over a polarizer?

Underneath the NC filter is my Hoya UV filter, and underneath that there is the collar for my Nikon HB-32 lens hood. I'm still on a steep learning curve here - would a skylight filter supersede my UV filter?

Most importantly, does the problem repeat itself without the filters attached?

Will experiment next time I have chance - but it seems a logical way of determining if it's the filters affecting the autofocus.

  

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FE Fan   Silver Spring, US  Registered since 18th Oct 2004 Wed 02-Jul-08 02:07 AM
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#10. "RE: 'r05' text - D60 occasional shutter release failure"
In response to Reply # 8



Glad to have been able to offer some insight..

I see from your post below that you have a "go forward" strategy.

With respect to your filter quandary, almost any new polarizer will probably be a circular pol, but it doesn't hurt to ask.

In terms of which filter should supersede another, the simple rule is to avoid stacking filters. In addition to creating a lot of air-to-glass surfaces (which increase the chances for flare), it also may lead to vignetting problems when using a wide angle lens. (I learned this the hard way.)

If you use a protective (skylight, UV or NC filter) filter, take it off before using a pol, neutral density filter, etc.

To answer your question about which protective filter to use, I would recommend the NC (clear) filter over the UV or skylight filter, if you want a protective filter. There is a host of information on the topic here: http://www.nikonians.org/html/resources/guides/uv_haze_skylight/uv_haze_skylight_filters1.html


Bart
D300s D40 F3HP FE FM2n Nikkormat FTN

Everything is a subject. Every subject has a rhythm. To feel it is the raison d'Ítre.
The photograph is a fixed moment of such a raison d'Ítre, which lives on in itself.
- Andre Kertesz


My Nikonians Gallery

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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Scotty Silver Member  Ely, Cambridgeshire, UK  Nikonian since 07th Feb 2002 Tue 01-Jul-08 10:17 AM
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#6. "RE: 'r05' text - D60 occasional shutter release failure"
In response to Reply # 4



I think what some people mean when they talk about "not enough contrast to enable the camera to focus" is that if you point the lens at a clear area of sky for example where it is all one colour and tone, the camera can't find an "edge" to lock on to.

If you were shooting landscapes you may well have tried (inadvertantly) to focus on the sky where no contrast was available -hence the lack of focus and lack of picture.

When you look through the viewfinder you should see the focus points, try putting the active one on the horizon so the camera can lock onto the contrast between the land and the sky...

Just a thought...

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FE Fan   Silver Spring, US  Registered since 18th Oct 2004 Tue 01-Jul-08 11:15 AM
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#7. "RE: 'r05' text - D60 occasional shutter release failure"
In response to Reply # 6



Great point! I've had this happen when trying to focus on something as innocuous as a solid colored t-shirt...

Bart
D300s D40 F3HP FE FM2n Nikkormat FTN

Everything is a subject. Every subject has a rhythm. To feel it is the raison d'Ítre.
The photograph is a fixed moment of such a raison d'Ítre, which lives on in itself.
- Andre Kertesz


My Nikonians Gallery

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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mrshift   Bristol, UK  Registered since 28th Jun 2008 Tue 01-Jul-08 06:43 PM
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#9. "RE: 'r05' text - D60 occasional shutter release failure"
In response to Reply # 6



Cheers Alex,

I'll try to be more wary the focus point(s) in future then. It makes sense that it may be having issues with this, as the times it failed I was pointing either at the mountainous horizon (and with strong aerial perspective, little contrast between land and sky), or early morning mist. Both may have led to AF issues. Looks like it may be manual focus on these occasions then, as a workaround.

Good suggestion, thanks.

  

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