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Forums Lobby GET TO KNOW YOUR CAMERA & MASTER IT Nikon D60/D50/D40 (Public) topic #26214
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Subject: ""low-end" and the "high-end" ???" Previous topic | Next topic
louischeng328 Registered since 06th Jan 2008Thu 28-Feb-08 06:18 PM
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""low-end" and the "high-end" ???"


Markham, CA
          

Dear all potential respondents

As i was reading over the posts in our site, i have came across words like "low-end portrait range".

So can anyone one please help me to explain the difference b/t the using an example please

  

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MotoMannequin Moderator Awarded for his extraordinary skills in landscape and wildlife photography Nikonian since 11th Jan 2006Thu 28-Feb-08 06:35 PM
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#1. "RE: "low-end" and the "high-end" ???"
In response to Reply # 0
Thu 28-Feb-08 06:36 PM by MotoMannequin

Livermore, CA, US
          

The answer depends on the context of the question.

If "low-end" is referring to focal length, portraits are traditionally shot with lenses ranging from about 70mm to about 135mm. "Low end" might mean lenses at the 70-85mm focal range. Note that on Nikon's DX-sized sensor, this range shifts down to something like 50mm-90mm because of the smaller sensor cropping the image, so the 50mm lens is at the low end, and 85mm is at the high end.

"Low end" could also refer to quality, where the ~$350 85mm f/1.8D is a low-end lens, and the ~$1000 85mm f/1.4D is a high-end lens. Both are excellent, but the 1.4 is legendary.

Larry - a Bay Area Nikonian
My Nikonians gallery

www.tempered-light.com

  

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louischeng328 Registered since 06th Jan 2008Fri 29-Feb-08 02:38 PM
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#2. "RE: "low-end" and the "high-end" ???"
In response to Reply # 1


Markham, CA
          

thanks Larry,

i get the price part,

so, generally speaking, "Low end" means lenses at the 70-85mm focal range?

  

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MotoMannequin Moderator Awarded for his extraordinary skills in landscape and wildlife photography Nikonian since 11th Jan 2006Fri 29-Feb-08 02:49 PM
8581 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profileClick to send message via AOL IM
#3. "RE: "low-end" and the "high-end" ???"
In response to Reply # 2
Fri 29-Feb-08 02:56 PM by MotoMannequin

Livermore, CA, US
          

>so, generally speaking, "Low end" means lenses at
>the 70-85mm focal range?

On a 35mm film camera, yes.

Nikon DSLRs (except the D3) however use a sensor that's smaller than 35mm film, so compared to 35mm you get a cropped view, which changes the game. A 50mm lens on a DX camera gives you about the same angle of view as a 75mm lens on a 35mm camera (multiply by 1.52). So, on a DX camera, 50mm-60mm (equivalent to 75mm-90mm) is your approximate low end.

Worth noting, the focal length equivalence is in term of angle of view, not depth of field. The longer lenses in the 35mm format inherently have shallower depth of field which is a big advantage for that format when going for blurred background in portraiture.

If you're in a D40/D40x/D60 and looking for an AF portrait lens, then good options are the new Micro Nikkor 60mm f/2.8 AF-S or the Sigma 50-150mm f/2.8 EX DC HSM. If you don't need AF but you're on a budget, then the Nikkor 50mm f/1.8D, 50mm f/1.4D or 85mm f/1.8D are perfect starting points.

Larry - a Bay Area Nikonian
My Nikonians gallery

www.tempered-light.com

  

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