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Forums Lobby GET TO KNOW YOUR CAMERA & MASTER IT Nikon D90/D80/D70 (Public) topic #50698
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Subject: "Night/low light photography advice" Previous topic | Next topic
zooyorkcity Registered since 26th Sep 2006Tue 26-Sep-06 09:10 PM
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"Night/low light photography advice"


US
          

I just got my D70 and started getting into photography. I have the lens kit that came with the camera, but I am interested in taking more indoor low light or night street scene (w/ tripod) photography. Someone recommended the Sigma 18-50mm lens for the indoor low lighting/dusk shots. What do you all think?

Also, any beginner advice on low light photography would be greatly appreciated. I'm just starting out and I will have tons of questions.

Thanks!

  

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edmun Registered since 16th Sep 2003Tue 26-Sep-06 09:41 PM
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#1. "RE: Night/low light photography advice"
In response to Reply # 0


eugene, US
          

Do you want to stop motion or do you want a landscape approach to night photography. ie people in motion.

If you want to stop motion, then it is fast lens and high ISO's.

It is prime lens of f1.4 and ISO 1600 in many cases.

If it is to have nice sharp images with head and tailights as streaks then the lens you have will do that. You will be shooting at f11 or f8 for depth of field and your tripod will give you sharp images.

Go to a book store and look at the many books on night photography to narrow what you want to do down.

I have taken night picture with a 90 mm f8 Super Angulon where the exposure were like 5 to 15 minuts.

I would try what you have -- post what you get and go from there.

Getting a new lens until you understand what you want to do is putting the horse before the cart.

There is a nice cheap lens that will be a good place to start and theat is the prime lens 50 mm f 1.8.

It will allow 8 times more light to the sensor than the F5.6 lens you have. It is a slight telephoto.

You should be able to get a used one for $60 and a new one for a little over $100.

The F1.4 version is about $200 more and lets in almost double the light. (This would be my choice) These make good classic portrait lens.

It would also be nice if your profile had some data in it -

ledmun

  

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ehparis Registered since 25th May 2006Tue 26-Sep-06 10:43 PM
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#2. "RE: Night/low light photography advice"
In response to Reply # 0


US
          

Shooting at night and with available light are close to being two entirely different subjects.

As a general rule you'll want lens(es) with fast (wide) apertures. These would be lenses with a maximum aperture in the f1.2, f1.4, or f1.8 range. If you have a D70s and a kit lens it has a much wider aperture than this.

The least expensive way to get started would be the 50mm f1.8 lens for around $100. It is also an extremely sharp lens.

I personally prefer the 50mm f1.4 lens, a bit faster, and the 85mm f1.4 lens. A 35mm f1.4 lens is on my "like to have" list.

Low light suggestion: When shooting in low light it's best to try and avoid having light sources (street lights, lamps, etc.) in your field of view. There are any number of good books available on "low light," "existing light," or "night photography" topics.

Jerry

"If your pictures aren't good enough,
you're not close enough." -Robert Capa

  

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alegria Registered since 20th May 2006Wed 27-Sep-06 08:55 PM
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#3. "RE: Night/low light photography advice"
In response to Reply # 0


US
          

hi,

i do alot of night photography and the most important aspect is the tripod setup. a good starting point is to read this article from nikonians about tripod setups. you might want to use a tripod for indoor work too. i do.

http://www.nikonians.org/html/resources/jrp_faq/what_tripod/tripods_1.html

the type of lens you use is really determined by your style and how you view things. start with your kit lens and see if this type of shooting appeals to you before getting another lens.

technique is paramount in night photography. i highly recomend getting a remote release before buying more equipment. it will be the best 20 bucks spent.

  

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rayonline Registered since 22nd Jul 2003Wed 27-Sep-06 09:41 PM
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#4. "RE: Night/low light photography advice"
In response to Reply # 0


NZ
          

What sorta photo you taking?

If you doing night photo at the peak lookout and want streaks of car lights etc etc .. or fireworks. Then get a tripod and use a remote and use any lens at f.16 or f.8 or f.11 etc etc. Your camera speed can be 1/60 or 1/15 or even 5 seconds or 30 seconds, with the remote up to 30 minutes.

If you doing photo at night of things that is moving such as sports, events demonstration performances or maybe even pple photo's at night, obviously pple cannot stay still for so long. Then you need a lens with a f.2.8 or lower number like a f.1.8 or f.1.2 etc etc. Cos low f number allows you to use a faster camera speed. Cheaper lenses of f.3.5 or f.5.6 would allow you a slower camera speed.

The 50mm f.1.8 is a low cost option. Have a look around.

  

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