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Subject: "dust on sensor of d7000" Previous topic | Next topic
tedt Silver Member Nikonian since 27th Dec 2004Sun 04-Nov-12 12:34 AM
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"dust on sensor of d7000"


pgh, US
          

any help with stopping getting dust on sensor of d7000

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four eighty sparky Silver Member Nikonian since 08th Apr 2011Sun 04-Nov-12 02:10 AM
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#1. "RE: dust on sensor of d7000"
In response to Reply # 0


US
          

In a nutshell: Quit using it.

If you're gonna use a DSLR, dirty sensors are a fact of life.

____________________________

My toys: A pair of gripped D600s, Sigma 8mm circular fisheye, Sigma 15mm full-frame fisheye, Tokina 17/3.5 SL, 17-35 2.8D, 24-85 G, 24-120/4G, 28-200 D, 50/1.8D, 50/1.8G, 70-200 2.8 G VRII, 70-300G, 105/2.8D Micro, 500 f/8 Reflex: Sigma 600mm, Celestron 2000mm: PB-6 bellows, Nikon 1.4 and 1.7x TCs, auto macro tube set: SB600: Manfrotto 055XB/804RC2/390RC2 & 560B-1: Gossen Starlite: Easy-Up AP1500: 40' WonderPole

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Gamecocks Silver Member Nikonian since 22nd Jul 2010Sun 04-Nov-12 11:08 AM
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#2. "RE: dust on sensor of d7000"
In response to Reply # 0


Joanna, US
          

You won't stop it but you can do things that might lessen the chance of dust getting to the sensor. The first important step is to take care when change lenses by holding the camera down, wind conditions, environment, etc. Good luck.

John

Nobody should seek his own good, but the good of others. <><

  

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Chris Platt Silver Member Nikonian since 30th Sep 2012Sun 04-Nov-12 11:14 AM
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#3. "RE: dust on sensor of d7000"
In response to Reply # 0


Newburg, US
          

As mentioned above, dust on the sensor is a fact of life with DSLRs. Keep a rocket blower handy to blow the dust off lenses and the sensor (when necessary), and minimize it by keeping dust in mind when considering when, where, and how often you change your lenses. Zoom lenses may reduce the frequency of lens changes, but the zoom action may also admit some dust. Take advantage of the D7000's sensor cleaning function to shake dust off the sensor (p 284 in manual). A little dust on the sensor is easily managed in post processing.

You can manage dust, but you can't stop it. With care in how I change lenses, frequent use of a blower to remove dust from the lenses and camera surfaces before and during lens changes, and employing the sensor cleaning function, I rarely notice dust specs on my images.

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Rassie Silver Member Nikonian since 08th Jan 2006Sun 04-Nov-12 01:22 PM
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#4. "RE: dust on sensor of d7000"
In response to Reply # 1


Milton, CA
          

And this reply is helping the original poster exactly how? Why not make some sensible recommendations instead of what you just wrote?

Better to write nothing than to stir controversy like this.

Regards

My Nikonians gallery

  

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RLDubbya Registered since 24th Dec 2011Sun 04-Nov-12 01:59 PM
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#5. "RE: dust on sensor of d7000"
In response to Reply # 0
Sun 04-Nov-12 02:00 PM by RLDubbya

US
          

I've had my d7000 bodies for 10 months. One body has 9500 shutter activations, the other, 4500. I haven't cleaned the sensors yet.

I try to keep a 24-70 zoom mounted on one body, and a 70-200 mounted on the other body when I'm doing only still work. Sometimes, I'll have to toss on my old kit lens which is wider, especially if I'm shooting video.

I do what I can to minimize lens changes. When I do change lenses, I make sure to do it quickly, including capping the rear element of the lens coming off.

I don't bother with a rocket blower, although I have one. Thom Hogan (bythom.com) has a nice article on sensor cleaning, and one of his observations is that use of the built in vibrate function is as good as a rocket blower for knocking dust off the sensor. I have that set to vibrate at both power off/on, and try to remember to keep the camera held horizontally as though taking a photo, so that the dust falls off properly.

I do keep canned air back in my office / studio. I use the canned air to blow off the front and rear of the lens prior / post shoot, and obviously if I see any dust, etc.

I try to keep my office / studio clean, so that there's not a lot of dust floating around where I clean the lenses. I don't know if that helps much, but...I also use an air purifier in that space, which does help to minimize dust.


I'm pretty sure (just based on a gut feeling) that if I took a picture of the sky at f22, there would be a lot of dust particles show up. I don't normally take pictures of the sky at f22, so I don't really worry about that. I'm lucky if I get to use f5.6, honestly, most of my shooting takes place indoors or in heavily shaded areas.

EDIT: I had a D5000 prior to my D7000. I had it for about 14 months, ran up 18,000 shutter activations, and never cleaned the sensor.

  

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JosephK Silver Member Nikonian since 17th Apr 2006Sun 04-Nov-12 05:42 PM
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#6. "RE: dust on sensor of d7000"
In response to Reply # 0
Sun 04-Nov-12 05:43 PM by JosephK

Seattle, WA, US
          

There is no stopping of the dust. However, you can slow it down; but ultimately, your goal should be taking pictures not worrying about the dust.

Dust can be minimized by fewer lens changes, pointing the camera down during the lens changes, not changing lenses in dusty environments, not using the camera in dusty environments.

However, the better thing to do is to use the camera as you will and just clean the sensor as needed. A rocket blower will help remove the loose dust. A wet cleaning will be needed for the rest. There are good products and tutorial at
http://www.copperhillimages.com

---------+---------+---------+---------+
Joseph K
Seattle, WA, USA

D700, D200, D70S, 24-70mm f/2.8, VR 70-200mm f/2.8 II,
50mm f/1.4 D, 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 VR, 18-70mm f/3.5-4.5 DX

  

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four eighty sparky Silver Member Nikonian since 08th Apr 2011Sun 04-Nov-12 05:49 PM
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#7. "RE: dust on sensor of d7000"
In response to Reply # 4


US
          

And your response is even far less useful.

____________________________

My toys: A pair of gripped D600s, Sigma 8mm circular fisheye, Sigma 15mm full-frame fisheye, Tokina 17/3.5 SL, 17-35 2.8D, 24-85 G, 24-120/4G, 28-200 D, 50/1.8D, 50/1.8G, 70-200 2.8 G VRII, 70-300G, 105/2.8D Micro, 500 f/8 Reflex: Sigma 600mm, Celestron 2000mm: PB-6 bellows, Nikon 1.4 and 1.7x TCs, auto macro tube set: SB600: Manfrotto 055XB/804RC2/390RC2 & 560B-1: Gossen Starlite: Easy-Up AP1500: 40' WonderPole

Visit my website.

  

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NRousu Registered since 16th May 2012Mon 05-Nov-12 08:25 PM
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#8. "RE: dust on sensor of d7000"
In response to Reply # 0


CA
          

I frequently change lenses and I'm not going to stop any time soon, so I have to deal with dust issues as well.

I heartily agree with the suggestions of using a Rocket Blower as well as the on board sensor cleaning function. I use both frequently, out of necessity.

I would add another suggestion to the mix. Periodically (or as needed), take your camera into a local reputable camera shop and get the sensor and chamber cleaned. This can help keep some of the present debris from recycling its way on to your sensor and get a bit of a 'fresh start' before it accumulates again.

  

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tedt Silver Member Nikonian since 27th Dec 2004Tue 06-Nov-12 05:07 AM
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#9. "RE: dust on sensor of d7000"
In response to Reply # 4


pgh, US
          

thank you

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mdallie Silver Member Nikonian since 03rd Jan 2011Tue 06-Nov-12 09:28 AM
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#10. "RE: dust on sensor of d7000"
In response to Reply # 8


Novi, US
          

I'll add that I try to have my camera pointed down when I am changing lenses.

The manual says to always turn the power off when you change lenses. Somewhere I read that if the camera is powered on, the sensor is charged and it will attract the dust more significantly when your lens is off (not an engineer so I can't validate this perspective).

Mike

  

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Yakker0117 Registered since 23rd Oct 2012Tue 06-Nov-12 11:49 AM
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#11. "RE: dust on sensor of d7000"
In response to Reply # 0


US
          

Unfortunate that there are those that post useless replies. They are like dust....a fact of life that we have to endure.

At any rate, I have had dust on my D7000 sensor. I was tepmted to "go in" with a cotton swab to clean it. However, before doing that I used the D7000 sensor vibrator several times along with a VERY MILD amount of air. The result was excellent. No more dust particles.

I do try to follow good technique when changing lenses. It helps minimize the amount of dust.

Enjoy!

  

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gkaiseril Gold Member Nikonian since 28th Oct 2005Tue 06-Nov-12 02:22 PM
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#12. "RE: dust on sensor of d7000"
In response to Reply # 11
Tue 06-Nov-12 04:17 PM by gkaiseril

Chicago, US
          

35mm film cameras did not have big problem with dust because the recording media was wiped clean by the film cassette holder coming out from and being wound into the cassette. But the processed negatives collected dust that needed to be blown off or brushed off before enlarging.

Because the digital camera does not replace the recording media with each shot and the sensor is electronically charged it will gather any dust the enters the camera's mirror box. P&S cameras are pretty well sealed so there is little change of dust getting inside of the camera. dSLR cameras with some lens constructions and the changing of lenses provides an opportunity for dust to get inside the camera and be attracted to the sensor or recording media. Just like the film recording media, the dSLR camera's recording media needs to be cleaned of dust.

More modern dSLRs have a vibrating sensor that can shake dust particles off of the sensor and onto a sticky strip on the bottom of the camera box. But this sensor cleaning will not deal with condensation and dust forming rings or dust and adhering to the sensor. For this only a wet cleaning with lint free swabs and a special cleaning solution will work. The special cleaning solution is designed not harm the filters over the sensor and dry with very little or no streaking. Older dSRLs are cleaned of dust by the use of a Rocket Blower as instructed in the Nikon camera user manual.

Do do not put a cotton swab in a camera's mirror box. Cotton is notoriously full of lint and long fibers. The camera box has a black mat irregular interior designed to reduce or eliminate light reflections. The cotton lint and fibers will adhere to the camera box interior and will cause problems with light reflections or floating into the view finder or onto the sensor.

A well known blogger told of using a vacuum cleaner to remove dust. Maybe tung in check, but another bad idea. The force of the vacuum will bring other material into the camera's mirror box.

Also do not use compressed air cleaners since as the compressed gas expands it also cools, Charles' Law: The Temperature-Volume Law. Also one does not know if water lubricants have been filtered from the compressed air. Then you may have solids within the can that could be propelled with some force onto the sensor and filters.

Oh, by the way, you are a source of dust because your top layer of your skin is constantly shedding and being replaced.

Does that make dust a fact of life?

If it is not, then dust is a result of life.

George
My Nikonian Galleries

  

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gfinlayson Silver Member Nikonian since 24th Jan 2011Sun 11-Nov-12 09:42 AM
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#13. "RE: dust on sensor of d7000"
In response to Reply # 12


Maidenhead, GB
          

Because I shoot a fair bit of macro often using apertures around f/16, the sensor dust on my D7000 becomes quite apparent. Cleaning with a rocket blower works to a point, but I've resorted to wet cleaning with a Delkin Sensor Scope kit every few months.

If done carefully, it presents virtually no risk of sensor damage.

  

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dm1dave Administrator Awarded for high level knowledge and skills in various areas, most notably in Wildlife and Landscape Nikonian since 12th Sep 2006Sun 11-Nov-12 10:17 PM
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#14. "RE: dust on sensor of d7000"
In response to Reply # 1


Lowden, US
          

Rassie is correct.

Our mission here at Nikonians is to ”Learn, Share and Inspire.”

In order to do that, we need to maintain friendly community in which new members can ask questions without fear of ridicule.

Dave Summers
Lowden, Iowa
Nikonians Photo Contest Director

Nikonians membership -
"My most important photographic investment, after the camera"

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Showcase your best work in any of our 7 Monthly Nikonians Photo contests.

Wildlife | Landscape | Macro | Sports | Travel | Underwater | Online Assignments| Best of 2014

  

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sandyphenley Registered since 04th Dec 2012Tue 04-Dec-12 08:51 PM
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#15. "RE: dust on sensor of d7000"
In response to Reply # 14


GB
          

Arctic Butterfly. Works like a charm.

  

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