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Forums Lobby MASTER YOUR TOOLS - Hardware & Software Digital postprocessing & workflow (Public) Adobe postprocessing software (Public) topic #10340
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Subject: "Lens correction" Previous topic | Next topic
Saint Trickster Registered since 18th Feb 2013Sat 09-Mar-13 09:01 AM
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"Lens correction"


UK
          

Hi

Simple question but if you don't ask.....
Is it best to use the lens correction in my D7000, the lens correction in Lightroom 4 or both together.
I'm not sure if they are mutually exclusive or not?

Thanks

ST

  

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blw Moderator Awarded for his high level of expertise in various areas Nikonian since 18th Jun 2004Sat 09-Mar-13 02:43 PM
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#1. "RE: Lens correction"
In response to Reply # 0


Richmond, US
          

If it's corrected already, don't do it again. But I shoot raw, and I'm 99% sure that the raw file is not corrected, so doing it in LR4 is appropriate.

_____
Brian... a bicoastal Nikonian and Team Member

My gallery is online. Comments and critique welcomed any time!

  

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Antero52 Silver Member Awarded for his expertise in post-processing, being  consistently helpful and professional. Nikonian since 07th Jul 2009Sat 09-Mar-13 04:03 PM
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#2. "RE: Lens correction"
In response to Reply # 0
Sat 09-Mar-13 04:03 PM by Antero52

Vantaa, FI
          

Brian is 99% sure and 100% correct. Raw data is raw data, ie, uncorrected, at least with Nikon cameras. The rationale is that cameras can do "quick and dirty" corrections to make good jpg files quickly. But if you use raw files, it's up to you whether you want to apply the lens corrections and to what degree.

Why would you not apply lens correction? If you mean lens profile corrections, consider a wildlife photo shot with a long lens. Long lenses typically have pincushion distortion. If you correct it, a target that's close to the image edge may become cropped. In nature shots it may be better to live with the distortions than having something cropped as a default action. If you do the correction in LR, you can adjust the degree of correction.

Plus, should you use Adaptive Wide Angle filter in CS6, it's better not to do any profile corrections beforehand. AWA filter uses the lens profile information and applies the corrections as part of the process. (Or this is what Martin Evening's CS6 book tells me.)

Regards, Antero

  

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quenton8 Silver Member Awarded for bringing his experience to the Nikonians community helping members with printing and the use of post-processing software from the perspective of an IT professional. Ribbon awarded for his enthusiastic and repeated support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Nikonian since 11th Apr 2010Sat 09-Mar-13 04:57 PM
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#3. "RE: Lens correction"
In response to Reply # 2


Toronto, CA
          

I agree with Antero -- do as little as possible (nothing) in the camera, assuming you are going to do any post-processing.

I just had a photo (taken on the fly at our Church) the other day where a part I really wanted would have been cropped out by distortion correction. So instead I cloned a bit onto the edge and then did the distortion correction. It would have been impossible to clone back in the subject matter I wanted.

To be a bit more specific, if you are going to do post-processing, I would shoot RAW - and if you really want that instant JPEG, shoot both, and use the RAW for any post-processing. It took me about 2 months to get there after getting my first DSLR, that was about 4 years ago, and I only do RAW now.

----
Dennis Smith.

  

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mipo Silver Member Nikonian since 06th Aug 2008Mon 11-Mar-13 03:21 AM
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#4. "RE: Lens correction"
In response to Reply # 3
Mon 11-Mar-13 03:22 AM by mipo

Laval, CA
          

I have lens profile correction set as a Lightroom preset that gets applied to all imports of new pictures.
Works great so far.

Michel

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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Antero52 Silver Member Awarded for his expertise in post-processing, being  consistently helpful and professional. Nikonian since 07th Jul 2009Mon 11-Mar-13 06:03 AM
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#5. "RE: Lens correction"
In response to Reply # 4


Vantaa, FI
          

> "I have lens profile correction set as a Lightroom preset that gets applied to all imports of new pictures. Works great so far."

Absolutely. There's no harm in doing so. That's because all adjustments and corrections to raw images are non-destructive. In the rare event that you have a shot wherein lens profile correction has cropped out something you'd like to keep, it's simple to uncheck the profile correction.

Not so in jpg land wherein corrections are irreversible. What the camera has cropped out, let no man put back.

Regards, Antero

  

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walkerr Administrator Awarded for his con tributed articles published at the Resources Awarded for his in-depth knowledge in multiple areas Donor Ribbon awarded for his very generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Nikonian since 05th May 2002Mon 11-Mar-13 12:21 PM
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#6. "RE: Lens correction"
In response to Reply # 5


Colorado Springs, US
          

Keep in mind that in Lightroom, edits to jpegs are also non-destructive, so they're completely reversible. Similar to with raw files, nothing gets "baked in" until the images are exported from the catalog. Even then, the originals are still untouched. It's a new file that's exported.

Rick Walker

My photos:
GeoVista Photography

  

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Saint Trickster Registered since 18th Feb 2013Mon 11-Mar-13 01:15 PM
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#7. "RE: Lens correction"
In response to Reply # 6


UK
          

Hi guys,

Thank you so much for the informative replies, this was much more than I was hoping for.
I have always shot in RAW since getting Lightroom 10 months ago but only because I was recommended to do so. It's only now that I'm starting to understand the benefits of doing so and I'm glad I made this choice.
With my old D5100 I had Lightroom set up to make lens corrections when importing new photo's but after getting my new toy (D7000) I noticed the in camera correction hence my question. (I would guess the D5100 had this too but I never noticed it)
I'll continue to shoot RAW and will use LR to do all the changes to the images, I just love the way you can't destroy the original in LR.

Many thanks

ST

  

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Antero52 Silver Member Awarded for his expertise in post-processing, being  consistently helpful and professional. Nikonian since 07th Jul 2009Mon 11-Mar-13 05:29 PM
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#8. "RE: Lens correction"
In response to Reply # 6


Vantaa, FI
          

Rick,

The original question was whether to apply lens corrections in the camera or in the computer. If the camera creates a jpg file with lens profile corrections, and crops out some pixels in the process (as a result of correcting pincushion distortion), there is nothing anyone can do in LR to restore the lost pixels. I admit that this is not a common occurrence, and I only mentioned this as an example of why it is not always desirable to apply automatic lens profile corrections.

Regards, Antero

  

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walkerr Administrator Awarded for his con tributed articles published at the Resources Awarded for his in-depth knowledge in multiple areas Donor Ribbon awarded for his very generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Nikonian since 05th May 2002Mon 11-Mar-13 06:29 PM
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#9. "RE: Lens correction"
In response to Reply # 8


Colorado Springs, US
          

Makes sense.

Rick Walker

My photos:
GeoVista Photography

  

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Forums Lobby MASTER YOUR TOOLS - Hardware & Software Digital postprocessing & workflow (Public) Adobe postprocessing software (Public) topic #10340 Previous topic | Next topic