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Forums Lobby MASTER YOUR TOOLS - Hardware & Software Nikon Speedlights & Lighting topic #140
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Subject: "High Speed Synch" Previous topic | Next topic
bob Sun 22-Jul-01 10:08 PM

  
"High Speed Synch"



          

Hi:

Recently changed back to NIKON and have a N90s with a SB26 flash. Great combination and am getting exceptionally great exposures (as one would expect)... However, one of the reasons I went with the N90s and SB26 was to take advantage of HS flash synch (up to 1/4000 of a second). Obviously allowing great control of dof outdoors....

After getting all home and beginning to play with it... it appears (based on my understanding of the manuals and equipment) that to actually do HS synch above the defaulted 1/250 of a second, you have to do all sorts of manual calculations and settings which would be time consuming and in many instances require "loosing the moment"...

Some questions:
1) HELP!!!!!!!! Is this really the case, or am I misunderstanding the manual? In reviewing Ken Rockwell's evaluations http://kenrockwell.com/ it might appear that I am dead on.. it is a very cumbersome affair.

2) If this is the case, is this the situation with ALL NIKON combinations of bodies and flashes? In other words... would I face the same situation with a F100 and SB 28?

3) Finally.... does anyone know if this is the same with HS synch on Minolta and Canon? Not that either of these systems is an option, but at least if it is "automatic fill flash" up to 1/4000 or 1/8000 (as in Minolta) then possibly there is a chance NIKON might follow suit in the future...

Really appreciate drawing on your knowledge out there Nikonians!!

Thanks,

Bob - Dallas, TX

  

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Johnny Basic MemberMon 23-Jul-01 02:22 PM
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#1. "RE: High Speed Synch"
In response to Reply # 0


Westampton, US
          

I have never used the high speed sync on my setup yet but it was to my understanding that you could set the camera on shutter priority and the flash to 'normal' TTL settings. Then dial in the desired shutter speed and the flash would do the right thing.

Johnny

Johnny

---
"I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand." -Confucius

  

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bob Tue 24-Jul-01 09:01 PM

  
#2. "RE: High Speed Synch"
In response to Reply # 1



          

Johnny:

According to my understanding you have to go to manual and take various readings.... really cumbersome!!! Any idea how Minolta or Canon HS flash works... Are they truly "auto fill"?

Thanks Bob

  

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Johnny Basic MemberWed 25-Jul-01 01:13 PM
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#3. "RE: High Speed Synch"
In response to Reply # 2


Westampton, US
          

>According to my understanding you have
>to go to manual and
>take various readings.... really cumbersome!!!
>
I'll have to check more on it for you.

> Any idea how Minolta
>or Canon HS flash works...
>Are they truly "auto fill"?
>
The cameras themselves seem to be on par with Nikon as far as the fastest sync speed. Only the Minolta Maxxum 9 series will go faster (1/300 sec). It seems like all of the brains for high speed sync is in the flash. This makes sense. The biggest limiting factor in the camera is the speed of the shutter curtain. All three brands employ focal plane shutters. My guess is that above 1/250 sec, the whole frame is not exposed at the same time. If you were to put a flash to it, you would probably have one one band of exposed film in your shot. I believe that the high speed sync is where the flash fires off multiple flashes as the focal plan shutter is moving.

Want to go beyond 1/250 sec for normal flash sync? Go medium format that employs a leaf shutter.


Johnny


Johnny

---
"I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand." -Confucius

  

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Johnny Basic MemberFri 27-Jul-01 01:39 PM
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#4. "RE: High Speed Synch"
In response to Reply # 2


Westampton, US
          

Bob,

>According to my understanding you have
>to go to manual and
>take various readings.... really cumbersome!!!
>
I went back and took a look at some books. I stand corrected. You cannot simply go to shutter priority, dial faster than 1/250 and shoot away.

In Program and Aperture priority modes, you get a shutter speed of 1/60. The flash will vary its intensity to give you the proper TTL exposure. That is well and good for still lifes. What about freezing movement? There are some things that will blur at 1/60 sec.

You can go into Shutter priority. From there you can dial up to 1/250 sec and get the right TTL exposure. What if you're going with a large aperture (artistic effect) and still need fill flash (like softening harsh shadows of midday sun)?

FP flash to the rescue. FP is good for fills but I am assuming it is not good for key flash. 'Key' flash is where the flash is the main light. I believe its sole purpose is to provide fill flash at above 1/250 sec. To use it does involve more steps but chances are, you are not really doing fast action photography when you trying to employ this. What you need to do is:

Set your camera on manual. Dial in the aperture and shutter speed for a good ambient light exposure.

Turn on the SB26. Slide the top right hand switch to 'M'. Push the 'M' button until you see FP light up on the LCD screen (you will go through several pushes of the 'M' button to get to FP). On the bottom right hand corner, you will see a '1' or '2'. If you were to press the 'M' button, you will see it go from '1' (FP1) to '2' (FP2) and you'll see the distance scale change as well. Don't worry about setting the zoom nor aperture on the flash. It will pick it up from the camera. When you go into manual mode, you lose the TTL capability. You need to pay attention to your distance from your subject. May sure the distance scale on the flash jives with what your lens has selected as your distance for focus. If it does not, you can change the zoom or try FP2 by pressing the 'M' button on the flash once more.

This sounds complicated the first time you set it up but once you do so, it should be a breeze to use.


Johnny

Johnny

---
"I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand." -Confucius

  

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bob Fri 27-Jul-01 09:10 PM

  
#5. "RE: High Speed Synch"
In response to Reply # 4



          

Johnny:

Really appreciate the input and time taken to research this. I'll give it a try....

I'm sure there must be a reason why the auto 3-D fill-flash won't work with FP...

Thanks again, very much,

Bob

  

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Johnny Basic MemberSat 28-Jul-01 11:20 AM
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#6. "RE: High Speed Synch"
In response to Reply # 5


Westampton, US
          

Not a problem. Glad I could help.

> I'm sure there must be a reason why the
> auto 3-D fill-flash won't work with FP...
>

There is. As soon as you place the flash on manual, you lose the TTL capability (which is essential for 3-D fill flash). Unfortunately, you need to set the flash on manual when shooting with shutter speeds above 1/250 sec (the highest speed available for TTL flash sync).

Johnny

Johnny

---
"I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand." -Confucius

  

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bob Sat 28-Jul-01 02:29 PM

  
#7. "RE: High Speed Synch"
In response to Reply # 6



          

Johnny:

Got some feedback from the same question I posted on PHOTOZONE and per the gentleman that responded, both Canon and Minolta are full auto for HS Fill Flash (Canon covering both E-TTL and TTL modes). Apparently you simply "press" a switch on the back of the flash unit that moves it to high speed synch, and you shoot auto balanced fill flash as you would if not in the high synch mode.

My comment on the reason NIKON has not adapted this above was in response to this... If Canon and Minolta can make it full auto (simplicity), why can't NIKON??? While not a total pain to move the body to manual and make selected modes on other than the subject, then really watch your distance.... Wonder why it Nikon's marvelous flash (which it truly is) can't be set up like that of Canon or Minolta.....

Again, really appreciate the information and assistance.

Bob

  

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Johnny Basic MemberTue 31-Jul-01 01:56 PM
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#8. "RE: High Speed Synch"
In response to Reply # 7


Westampton, US
          

Interesting that Canon and Minolta are able to do this 'automagically'. Yes, if it can be done, Nikon should follow their lead.

Johnny

Johnny

---
"I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand." -Confucius

  

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